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Sustainable Economic Growth
Paragraphs Related to the Theme Paragraphs VII Summit

- Antigua and Barbuda - Argentina - Bahamas - Barbados - Belize - Bolivia - Brazil - Canada - Chile - Colombia - Costa Rica - Dominica - Dominican Republic - Ecuador - El Salvador - Grenada - Guatemala - Guyana - Haiti - Honduras - Jamaica - Mexico - Nicaragua - Panama - Paraguay - Peru - Saint Kitts and Nevis - Saint Lucia - Saint Vincent and the Grenadines - Suriname - Trinidad and Tobago - United States - Uruguay - Venezuela -
Reports
Date:  7/7/2016 
Economic Growth and Opportunity

At the 2015 Summit, President Obama emphasized the contribution small businesses make to creating jobs and growth, particularly for women. The United States is working with regional partners to launch new and expand and ongoing programs to increase growth opportunities in the regional economies.

“Recognizing the fundamental importance of international development cooperation in all of its modalities and dimensions, guided by solidarity, flexibility, complementarity, alignment with national priorities and voluntary participation, with particular attention to strengthening institutional capacity and the development of human capital to attain inclusive and sustainable development as the basis of prosperity with equity, and further recognizing the importance of public and private investment in research and development and science and technology infrastructure to encourage inclusive innovation.” (Prosperity with Equity: The Challenge of Cooperation in the Americas, 2015
Mandates for Action; Hemispheric Partnership for Development)

Americas Business Dialogue (ABD)

Established in 2014, the ABD made its high-level debut at the 2015 CEO Summit of the Americas in Panama, where business leaders presented its inaugural set of policy recommendations to heads of state, including President Obama. Since then, the U. S. government has supported the ABD’s institutionalization as the premier consultative mechanism for regional private sector engagement in the hemisphere. The ABD has grown in membership, promoted valuable public-private collaborations, and provided opportunities for high-level dialogue between government and business leaders. Thus far in 2016, the ABD has headlined a public-private dialogue in Buenos Aires on trade facilitation, and featured prominently in the Inter-American Development Bank’s Annual Meetings in Nassau, where ministers and CEOs highlighted financial integration, small business inclusion, and energy cooperation. The ABD also organized the private sector sessions for the Vice President’s U.S.-Caribbean-Central American Energy Summit in Washington in May 2016.

“Work to ensure that our countries… have significantly increased by 2025, broadband
access to overcome the digital gap.” (Prosperity with Equity: The Challenge of
Cooperation in the Americas, 2015 Mandates for Action; Hemispheric Partnership for
Development, b)

Communications and Connectivity

We have advanced broadband adoption and deployment of infrastructure in the Americas to support economic growth and opportunity and citizen participation in the region. Building from the Broadband Partnership of the Americas that President Obama launched at the 2012 Summit, the United States and its partners are to increase the adoption of fixed and mobile broadband service and the deployment of broadband infrastructure especially in rural communities. The Broadband Alliance for Progress in the Americas is advancing this objective by mobilizing the expertise and resources of the U.S. government, regional organizations, and the private sector to support the broadband adoption and deployment efforts of countries in the Americas.

The Global Connect Initiative, launched in September 2015 with Secretary Kerry's support, has the goal of catalyzing multi-stakeholder partnerships to bring 1.5 billion new internet users online by 2020. We have more partner countries in the Americas than in any other region in the world with whom we are promoting universal access to communications and broadband technologies as a tool for competitiveness, development, and economic prosperity.

Also, since the 2015 Summit, we have shared U.S. technical knowledge and assistance with partners in Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Costa Rica, Colombia, Guyana, Jamaica, and Mexico, on topics ranging from maintaining an open internet, spectrum management, planning and allocation, broadband accessibility by persons with disabilities, emergency communications to digital television transition.

Related to connectivity, progress also has been made in implementing the President’s new policy approach to Cuba. Changes undertaken by the Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control, Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security, and the Federal Communications Commission have enabled new opportunities for the provision of direct telecommunications services to Cuba. There are now four U.S. carriers providing direct facilities-based service to Cuba with other carriers expected to provide these services in the near future. In addition, for the first time, many U.S. consumers now have an option to roam using their own U.S. mobile device while in Cuba. U.S. firms may now export certain telecommunications equipment to Cuba without having to apply for a license. We have also continued our efforts of advancing broadband adoption and deployment in the region, including the allocation of spectrum for mobile broadband, by promoting efforts within the Inter-American Telecommunication Commission under the OAS, the Caribbean Telecommunications Union, and the Latin-American Forum of Telecommunications Regulators (Regulatel).
Paragraphs: - Paragraphs VII Summit: -

Date:  7/7/2016 
Small Business Network of the Americas (SBNA)

After the 2012 Summit in Panama, President Obama announced “the United States will work with its partners to expand SBNA so that it can independently help micro, small, and medium size enterprises, and entrepreneurs, and increase opportunities for growth.” The overarching goal of Small Business Network of the Americas is to increase international connectivity of small business support infrastructure to improve both domestic and international growth opportunities for small and medium businesses through job creation, business development resource access, and greater trade. The United States has put in place a regular process for over 4,000 small business service providers to participate in SBNA, with an eye toward establishing an independent association to facilitate greater cooperation among the service provider community. Since the last Summit, we have established the SBNA Partnership Program, under which service providers have formed more than 300 “sister center” relationships. We have hosted five sister center workshops and will continue doing so on a semi-annual basis to help centers find new partners. The U.S. Department of State anticipates providing up to $3 million in targeted grant funds to enable center partnerships to work together to benefit their small business clients. In addition to existing networks of incubators, accelerators, and other service providers, the United States is providing technical assistance to countries interested in adapting the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) model to local contexts. In 2015, there were 118 SBDCs operating in 13 countries in the region. By 2018, we expect 296 SBDCs to be operating in 16 countries across the region. Given that each SBDC serves an average of 367 small business clients per year, we expect the total number of clients served to exceed 100,000 small businesses annually. The United States has signed bilateral memoranda of understanding to support cooperation on SBNA goals with Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru, and Uruguay.

The United States and Brazil are committed to helping small businesses grow and entrepreneurs start new companies so that they can create jobs and ensure inclusive economic growth. To that end, the United States and Brazil signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on Promoting Entrepreneurship and the Growth of Micro-and-Small-Sized Enterprises in June 2015. The agreement not only advances the objectives of the Small Business Network of the Americas, but also promotes entrepreneurship among women. One key deliverable of the MOU was the execution of the LA Idea Incubator Program, which provided 22 scholarships for Brazilian entrepreneurs to undertake training programs at U.S.-based incubators and accelerators in late 2015. In addition, the U.S. Embassy in Brasilia offered tech-focused startup trainings for 100 Brazilian university students in March and May 2016, with mentorship from American and local entrepreneurs. Select participants will travel to Austin, Texas, for further activities and will receive additional support to launch their startups.

Supporting Local Businesses and Communities

The United States promotes and invests in the best ideas from local communities for their own economic and social development through the Inter-American Foundation (IAF). The IAF grants multi-year funding to citizen-led, grassroots development projects throughout the region and supports project implementation by providing technical advice and independent verification of project goals throughout the life of the grant. These grants enable community enterprises, cooperatives, and local businesses to get off the ground, refine their products and services, create jobs, and access the global marketplace. The U.S. government’s support helps vulnerable people improve their lives, strengthen the local economy, and remain in their communities to contribute as workers and leaders. Approximately 187,000 people acquired new knowledge and skills in agriculture, manufacturing, technical vocations, finance, planning, administration, marketing, civic engagement, and environmental conservation. Funds dedicated to education/training in FY15 totaled $4.5 million. Through the IAF, the United States committed another $25.2 million in the last five years to grants for agriculture, many of which enabled or improved food production for sale in domestic and international markets.


Feed the Future

In parts of the Americas, food insecurity and poor nutrition together pose an important obstacle to economic growth and social development. Feed the Future (FTF) is the U.S. government’s global hunger and food security initiative. With a focus on smallholder farmers, particularly women, FTF is establishing a foundation for lasting progress against global hunger by supporting countries in developing their agriculture sectors to spur economic growth that increases incomes and reduces hunger, poverty, and undernutrition. Under FTF, USAID and other U.S. government actors are working with host governments, other donors, the private sector, and civil society in poor rural areas in Guatemala, Haiti, and Honduras. Our programs are raising the productivity, quality, and income-earning potential of high-value and staple food crops, creating jobs, and improving nutrition outcomes. In Honduras, for example, FTF has leveraged $200 million from outside sources, including the Government of Honduras, other donors, and the private sector, for the Dry Corridor Alliance. This Alliance is working to accelerate sustainable economic development in the geographic corridor that stretches along Honduras’s southern and western borders, characterized by pervasive extreme poverty and erratic climatic conditions. The Alliance aims to lift 50,000 families out of extreme poverty, reduce undernutrition of children by 20 percent, and improve more than 280 kilometers of secondary and tertiary roads, providing market access to thousands.

Trade Facilitation

The WTO Trade Facilitation Agreement (TFA), concluded at the 9th WTO Ministerial
Conference in Bali in 2013, establishes binding commitments for WTO members to: expedite movement, release, and clearance of goods; improve transparency through commitments on publication and advance rulings; and improve cooperation among WTO Members on customs matters. According to the OECD, the potential cost reduction from a “full” implementation of the WTO TFA (that is, all provisions including the “best endeavor” provisions of the agreement) is 16.5 percent of total costs for low income countries, 17.4 percent for lower middle income countries and 14.6 percent for upper middle income countries.
For the WTO TFA to enter into force, two-thirds of the WTO’s members need to notify the WTO that they have completed their domestic procedures to accept the Agreement. The United States completed this process in January 2015.
At the Seventh Summit of the Americas, the United States joined 13 other countries in the region in a joint statement that considers the TFA’s “entry into force essential to enhance the competitiveness of the Americas in the global marketplace.” Ten countries in the Americas have since then joined the United States in ratifying the TFA. The United States applauds their leadership in that regard and encourages additional countries in the Americas to ratify the TFA for the region to play an important role in helping achieve its entry into force and benefit from its implementation. The United States remains committed to seeing the TFA enter into force as soon as possible.
USAID fosters enhanced public-private dialogue around trade facilitation, helping to pave the way for implementation of the WTO Trade Facilitation Agreement. USAID’s Regional Trade and Market Alliances (RTMA) project promotes inclusive economic growth through intraregional trade and exports. The project’s goal is to establish consolidated regional value chains and improve market access, particularly for agricultural products, through more robust market alliances and increased trade facilitation, regional harmonization, and institutional capacity. USAID has also partnered with USDA to help private sectors in the Americas to take advantage of trade opportunities.
The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Customs and Border Protection (CBP) have worked with, and provided support to governments in the Americas in identifying best practices for how to engage industry as new trade policies are developed. DHS and CBP have also worked with international organizations including the Inter-American Development Bank, World Customs Organization, and ABD to promote trade facilitation, specifically by sharing best practices for single window implementation.
Paragraphs: 7 Paragraphs VII Summit: -

Date:  6/2/2014 
Small Business Network of the Americas (SBNA)
- The Small Business Network of the Americas (SBNA), launched at the 2012 Summit of the Americas, facilitates an interconnected network of thousands of small business support centers in the Western Hemisphere and assists millions of small business owners. Interconnection expands the pool of available resources for business development, enhances access to business counseling services for entrepreneurs, and fosters small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) growth by providing a framework to connect businesses across the hemisphere. SBNA, in turn, promotes and supports job creation in SMEs and encourages greater trade among these businesses throughout the Western Hemisphere.
- The United States is working with its partners to increase the number of small business development centers (SBDCs) and other small business support centers; increase connections among SBDCs throughout the hemisphere; catalyze cross-border business-to-business connections; and expand resources for business development. In 2013, U.S. efforts generated $98.5 million in guaranteed lending to small businesses in Latin America.

Microfinance Growth Fund (MiGroF)
- President Obama announced the Microfinance Growth Fund (MiGroF) at the 2009 Summit of the Americas to provide a new source of funding for microfinance institutions (MFIs) in response to the reduction in their lending capacity due to the global credit crisis. It provides a stable medium- and long-term source of financing to allow MFIs throughout Latin America and the Caribbean to continue funding micro and small enterprises that have good repayment records and to find new entrepreneurs who have lacked access to microfinance services.
- The United States has disbursed $112 million to MiGroF to date, supporting access to finance for more than 100,000 micro and small enterprises in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Women’s Entrepreneurship in the Americas (WEAmericas)
- The United States and 11 private sector partners founded the Women’s Entrepreneurship in the Americas (WEAmericas) initiative at the 2012 Summit of the Americas. WEAmericas leverages public-private partnerships to promote inclusive economic growth in the Western Hemisphere by reducing barriers that women entrepreneurs face in starting and growing SMEs. The United States is also working with bilateral partners and has signed memoranda of understanding with Mexico, Brazil, Colombia, and Peru to further women’s economic empowerment and the goals of WEAmericas.
- Through these partnerships, the United States and its partners have awarded $1.5 million in small grants to 24 organizations to support women entrepreneurs across 24 countries, directly benefiting approximately 20,000 women. Approximately 300 women have directly participated in WEAmericas training programs, and over 100 additional women have received training from the initial trainees.
- Through ongoing partnerships, an additional 300 women will participate in WEAmericas training programs by 2015. Ongoing partnerships are also providing increased market access and access to capital for women entrepreneurs. For example, the Inter-American Development Bank is providing up to $55 million in grants and loans to improve lending to women-owned SMEs and WEConnect International is providing certification and supply chain integration services for women-owned SMEs.
- The United States is working to increase the number of public, private, and bilateral partners to expand opportunities available to women entrepreneurs under WEAmericas.

Supporting Local Businesses and Communities
- The United States promotes and invests in the best ideas from local communities for their own economic and social development through the Inter-American Foundation (IAF). The IAF grants multi-year funding to citizen-led, grassroots development projects throughout the region and supports project implementation by providing technical advice and independent verification of project goals throughout the life of the grant. These grants enable community enterprises, cooperatives, and local businesses to get off the ground, refine their products and services, create jobs, and access the global marketplace. The U.S. government’s support helps vulnerable people improve their lives, strengthen the local economy, and remain in their communities to contribute as workers and leaders.
- The IAF has dedicated 22 percent of its grant funds from 2009 to 2013 to enterprise development and 25 percent to training or education, for a total of $36.3 million. This support created, improved, or sustained at least 3,882 jobs in 2013 and 5,300 jobs in 2012, and resulted in many new micro and small businesses in the region. Through the IAF, the United States committed another $25.2 million in the last five years to grants for agriculture, many of which enabled or improved food production for sale in domestic and international markets.
Paragraphs: 20, 7 Paragraphs VII Summit: -

Date:  6/15/2010 
Economic Recovery
• President Obama led efforts to substantially increase the resources available to a reformed International Monetary Fund through
contributions to a renewed and expanded New Arrangements to Borrow (NAB). The United States also supported expanding the
Inter-American Development Bank's short term crisis response through changes in lending limits and capital ratios.
• As President Obama noted at the Summit, the United States worked with its G20 partners, setting aside over a trillion dollars to
ensure assistance to those countries that are the most vulnerable.

Source: REPORT OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT ON IMPLEMENTATION OF MANDATES FROM THE FIFTH SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS (United States 2010)
Paragraphs: 7 Paragraphs VII Summit: -

Date:  6/15/2010 
Americas Competitiveness Forum (ACF):

• The United States Secretary of Commerce will host the fourth ACF November 14-16, 2010, in Atlanta.
• The Forum provides a platform for nearly a thousand officials from the public sector, private sector, and civil
society to discuss ways to enhance the region’s competiveness.

Source: REPORT OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT ON IMPLEMENTATION OF MANDATES FROM THE FIFTH SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS (United States 2010)
Paragraphs: 13 Paragraphs VII Summit: -

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