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Security
Ministerials Paragraphs Related to the Theme Paragraphs VII Summit

- Antigua and Barbuda - Argentina - Bahamas - Barbados - Belize - Bolivia - Brazil - Canada - Chile - Colombia - Costa Rica - Dominica - Dominican Republic - Ecuador - El Salvador - Grenada - Guatemala - Guyana - Haiti - Honduras - Jamaica - Mexico - Nicaragua - Panama - Paraguay - Peru - Saint Kitts and Nevis - Saint Lucia - Saint Vincent and the Grenadines - Suriname - Trinidad and Tobago - United States - Uruguay - Venezuela -
Reports
Date:  7/7/2016 
Citizen Security

“We spoke about concerns regarding terrorism, organized crime, and other threats to our citizens’ security, and about the need to combine our efforts to combat them, by strengthening cooperation among our countries and adopting measures to prevent crime and violence.” (Closing statement at the conclusion of the Seventh Summit of the Americas, President Juan Carlos Varela)

“Recognizing that peace and social inclusion help to create better security conditions and that these, in turn, encourage greater prosperity, stability, and quality of life for people, noting that cooperation among our countries in this area should proceed in accordance with the principles enshrined in international law, considering in particular the principle of sovereignty and nonintervention in the internal affairs of states.” (Prosperity with Equity: The Challenge of Cooperation in the Americas, 2015
Mandates for Action; Security)

The U.S. Strategy for Engagement in Central America

In partnership with the governments of Central America, the United States has committed approximately $1.15 billion in citizen security in Central America, primarily through the Central America Regional Security Initiative (CARSI), since 2008. To build on the successes of CARSI and to comprehensively address the challenges facing the region, the U.S. government developed the U.S. Strategy for Engagement in Central America in 2014. The Strategy advances prosperity, governance, and security objectives in the region to promote a secure, democratic, and prosperous Central America which will provide an environment in which all of its citizens can thrive. Congress recommended up to $750 million in fiscal year (FY) 2016 funding to support the Strategy. The President requested an additional $1 billion in FY 2017, of which $750 million is intended for the Department of State and USAID. The investments of these countries, combined with support from the U.S. government and international partners, will advance our shared vision of a prosperous, secure, and accountable Central America.

As one component of the Strategy, CARSI funding continues to assist the seven nations of
Central America in the strengthening and integration of security in coordination with other countries, international financial institutions, the private sector, civil society, and the Central American Integration System. CARSI programs are designed to assist law enforcement and security forces to create safe streets, confront illicit trafficking, reduce the negative effects of gangs and criminal organizations, and strengthen border security deficiencies. CARSI also builds the capacity of law enforcement and the justice sector to serve citizens and address regional threats; and to advance community policing, gang prevention, and economic and social programming for at-risk youth and communities disproportionately affected by crime.

Caribbean Basin Security Initiative (CBSI)
The Caribbean Basin Security Initiative (CBSI) is a multi-year, regional citizen safety engagement with the Caribbean that stemmed from commitments made at the 2009 Summit of the Americas. The United States, CARICOM member nations, and the Dominican Republic are improving citizen safety throughout the Caribbean by working together to counter illicit trafficking and other transnational crimes that threaten regional security. Their goal is to substantially reducing illicit trafficking, increasing public safety, strengthening the rule of law, and addressing the underlying social and economic root causes of crime. Since 2010, the United States has committed $386.4 million for CBSI assistance, including maritime and aerial security cooperation, law enforcement capacity building, border/port security, firearms interdiction, justice sector reform, crime prevention, and at-risk youth.

With the help of equipment and training provided by the Department of State to Dominican law enforcement and counternarcotics entities, Dominican authorities seized 9.3 metric tons (MT) of cocaine in 2015, versus 5.4 MT in 2014. Through train-the-trainer course instruction and mentoring, the Trinidad and Tobago Police Service Training Academy has become a regional training hub for officers from eight other CBSI nations. Over the next five years in 25 Jamaican communities, USAID will be providing grant assistance to support community groups, NGOs, and civil society in volatile and vulnerable areas through strengthening local governance structures and improving safety and security. CBSI provided short-range interdiction boats to bolster the region’s interdiction capacity, continues advising and assisting Caribbean nations to improve their maritime maintenance and logistics efforts, and deployed a maritime logistics system to the partner nations that supports operational readiness. To reduce drug demand in The Bahamas, partnership between government and civil society has created the first twenty internationally certified substance use treatment professionals in the Western Hemisphere, creating best practice, evidence-based addiction treatment.

Merida Initiative

The Merida Initiative is an unprecedented partnership between the United States and Mexico to fight organized crime and associated violence while furthering respect for human rights and the rule of law throughout Mexico. The United States has committed $2.47 billion for the Merida Initiative. Under the partnership, the United States and Mexico have improved citizen safety in affected areas to fight drug trafficking, organized crime, corruption, illicit arms trafficking, money laundering, and the demand for drugs on both sides of the border. Bilateral efforts support strengthening Mexico’s institutions, especially police and justice systems at both the federal and state level; bolstering development of a secure border that facilitates legitimate trade and travel while disrupting illicit trade; and building strong and resilient communities able to withstand the pressures of crime and violence.

U.S.-Colombia Action Plan on Regional Security Cooperation

At the 2012 Summit of the Americas, President Obama and Colombian President Santos announced an agreement to develop the U.S.-Colombia Action Plan on Regional Security Cooperation, a coordination mechanism to support capacity-building to improve citizen security in third countries. Activities under the Action Plan support hemispheric citizen security priorities through capacity building in multiple areas, such as asset forfeiture, investigations, polygraphs, and interdiction. The United States and Colombia implemented 47 activities in Central America in 2013, 177 activities in Central America and the Caribbean in 2014, 284 in 2015, and 339 planned in 2016.
Paragraphs: - Paragraphs VII Summit: -

Date:  7/7/2016 
Peace Colombia

Peace Colombia has replaced the Colombia Strategic Development Initiative (CSDI). Peace
Colombia is a bilateral framework to channel U.S. assistance to post-accord Colombia in connection with the anticipated signing of a peace agreement with the FARC. U.S. assistance supports interdiction and manual eradication; capacity building and professionalization for Colombian military and police forces; access to rule of law; and creation of viable options for citizens in the licit economy, particularly in the agricultural sector. U.S. assistance also supports implementation of Colombian government reforms in land restitution; reparations for victims and vulnerable populations; demobilization and reintegration of ex-combatants; strengthening the Colombian Attorney General’s Office in support of human rights, the rule of law, and protection of vulnerable citizens; and addressing global climate change and environmental issues. The President’s FY 2017 request for Peace Colombia includes $391 million for Department of State and USAID programs as part of a $450 million interagency request.

Operations Bahamas, Turks and Caicos (OPBAT)

Operation Bahamas, Turks and Caicos (OPBAT) is a combined U.S. Coast Guard, Drug Enforcement Administration and law enforcement entities of The Bahamas and Turks and Caicos Islands partnership to combat drug smuggling. OPBAT assets also regularly assist with prosecuting human smuggling and search and rescue cases throughout its area of responsibility.

Strategy to Combat Transnational Organized Crime

In July 2011, the White House announced the Strategy to Combat Transnational Organized
Crime to build, balance, and integrate tools to combat transnational organized crime and related threats to U.S. national security – and to urge the United States’ partners to do the same. The strategy sets out 56 priority actions, starting with steps the United States can take within its borders to lessen the impact of transnational crime domestically and on the United States’ foreign partners. Other actions seek to enhance U.S. intelligence; protect the financial system and strategic markets; strengthen interdiction, investigations, and prosecutions; disrupt the drug trade and its facilitation of other transnational threats; and build international cooperation. The United States is working with other OAS member states to foster a permanent structure and coordination mechanisms for addressing organized crime and to promote greater cooperation and implementation of the international conventions on this matter, including the Hemispheric Plan of Action against Transnational Organized Crime. In 2016, the OAS established a new Department against Transnational Organized Crime within the OAS Secretariat.

Illicit Trafficking in Firearms

The ratification of the Inter-American Convention against the Illicit Manufacturing of and
Trafficking in Firearms, Ammunition, Explosives and other Related Materials (CIFTA) is a priority for the Obama administration. In January 2015, the Administration included CIFTA on its Treaty Priority List to the U.S. Senate and emphasized the importance of ratification in the July 2011 U.S. Strategy to Combat Transnational Organized Crime.

The United States has offered technical assistance to a variety of countries to trace illicit firearms and control, store, or destroy excess national stockpiles. Through the OAS, the United States has provided more than $1 million for the provision of marking equipment to countries in the hemisphere, increasing hemispheric capability to trace firearms and identify illicit trafficking routes and suppliers. To date, 25 OAS member states have received marking machines, 280 persons have been trained, and over 287,000 firearms have been marked. The United States has also signed eTrace agreements with 28 countries in the hemisphere, including all seven countries in Central America, and fourteen of the fifteen countries in the Caribbean. Expanding eTrace participation and follow-on investigating cooperation throughout the hemisphere is a priority for the U.S. government.

Through the Caribbean Basin Security Initiative, the United States has provided over $2.86 million in assistance. The U.S. government has posted two Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and
Explosives (ATF) Regional Firearms Advisors in the Caribbean who provide firearms expertise and training to local law enforcement. We have cooperated with Canada, to provide ballistics analysis equipment to Barbados, Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago to enable regional digital ballistics data sharing through the Regional Integrated Ballistics Information Network. Funds provided to the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament, and Development in the Americas regional project have enhanced the capacity of Caribbean states to combat illicit small arms and ammunition trafficking through operational forensic ballistics and stockpile management and destruction program.

Through CARSI, the United States has posted ATF Regional Firearms Advisors in Central America, who provide firearms expertise and training to local law enforcement. We have funded $1.295 million of the OAS Program of Assistance for Control of Arms and Munitions
(PACAM) stockpile management and destruction program in Central America.

Paragraphs: - Paragraphs VII Summit: -

Date:  6/2/2014 
Central America Regional Security Initiative (CARSI))
- CARSI assists the seven nations of Central America in the strengthening and integration of security in coordination with other nations, international financial institutions, the private sector, civil society, and the Central American Integration System (SICA).
- The United States has appropriated more than $642 million to CARSI programs and activities in the region. CARSI programs are designed to assist law enforcement and security forces to create safe streets, confront illicit trafficking, reduce the negative effects of gangs and criminal organizations, and strengthen border security deficiencies. CARSI also works to build the capacity of law enforcement and the justice sector to serve citizens and to address regional threats, and to advance community policing, gang prevention, and economic and social programming for at-risk youth and communities disproportionately affected by crime.

Caribbean Basin Security Initiative (CBSI)
- The Caribbean Basin Security Initiative (CBSI) is a multi-year, regional citizen safety engagement with the Caribbean that stemmed from commitments made at the 2009 Summit of the Americas. The United States, CARICOM member nations, and the Dominican Republic are improving citizen safety throughout the Caribbean by working together to substantially reduce illicit trafficking, increase public safety and security, and promote social justice.
- Since 2010, the United States has appropriated $263 million in funding for CBSI activities with its partners in the Caribbean. Activities include maritime and aerial security cooperation, law enforcement capacity building, border/port security, firearms interdiction, justice sector reform, crime prevention, and at-risk youth.

Merida Initiative
- The Merida Initiative is an unprecedented partnership between the United States and Mexico to fight organized crime and associated violence while furthering respect for human rights and the rule of law throughout Mexico.
- The United States has appropriated $2.1 billion since the Merida Initiative began in fiscal year 2008. Under the Initiative, the United States and Mexico have improved citizen safety in affected areas to fight drug trafficking, organized crime, corruption, illicit arms trafficking, money-laundering, and the demand for drugs on both sides of the border.
- Bilateral efforts support strengthening Mexico’s institutions, especially police and justice systems at both the federal and state level; bolstering development of a secure border that facilitates legitimate trade and travel while disrupting illicit trade; and building strong and resilient communities able to withstand the pressures of crime and violence.

U.S.-Colombia Action Plan on Regional Security Cooperation
- At the 2012 Summit of the Americas, President Obama and Colombian President Santos announced an agreement to develop a coordination mechanism to support capacity-building to improve citizen security in third countries: the U.S.-Colombia Action Plan on Regional Security Cooperation.
- Activities under the Action Plan support hemispheric citizen security priorities through capacity building in multiple areas, such as asset forfeiture, investigations, polygraphs, and interdiction. The United States and Colombia implemented 39 activities in Central America in 2013 and agreed to implement 152 activities in Central America and the Caribbean in 2014.

Colombia Strategic Development Initiative (CSDI)
- The U.S. government supports the Colombian government's National Consolidation Plan by selectively working in key “consolidation zones” where drug trafficking, violence, and the lack of government presence have historically converged. The U.S. government coordinates its efforts in these areas through the Colombia Strategic Development Initiative (CSDI), an inter-agency, whole-of-government approach to providing specific U.S. assistance in eradication and interdiction; capacity building of the military, national police, access to rule of law; and creation of viable options for citizens in the licit economy, particularly in the agricultural sector.
- CSDI also provides general support for the implementation of Colombian government reforms in land restitution; reparations for victims and vulnerable populations; demobilization and reintegration of ex-combatants; strengthening the Colombian Attorney General’s Office in support of human rights, the rule of law, and protection of vulnerable citizens; and addressing global climate change and environmental issues.
Paragraphs: 71, 1, 2 Paragraphs VII Summit: -

Date:  6/2/2014 
National Action Plan on Women, Peace, and Security, and the U.S. Strategy to Prevent and Respond to Gender-Based Violence Globally
- Building on the recognition that countries are more peaceful and prosperous when women are accorded full and equal rights and opportunity, President Obama released the first National Action Plan on Women, Peace, and Security in December 2011 and signed an executive order directing the plan’s implementation. The National Action Plan represents a fundamental change in how the United States approaches its diplomatic, military, and development-based support to women in areas of conflict by ensuring that their perspectives and considerations of gender are woven into the fabric of how the United States approaches peace processes, conflict prevention, the protection of civilians, and humanitarian assistance.
- In August 2012, the United States released the first U.S. Strategy to Prevent and Respond to Gender-based Violence Globally, accompanied by a presidential executive order directing its implementation. The Strategy includes a comprehensive, multi-sector approach to prevent and respond to gender-based violence through increased coordination of gender-based violence prevention and response efforts among U.S. government agencies and with other stakeholders; enhanced integration of gender-based violence prevention and response efforts into existing U. S. government work; improved collection, analysis, and use of data and research to enhance gender-based violence prevention and response efforts; and enhanced or expanded U.S. government programming that addresses gender-based violence.
Paragraphs: 3 Paragraphs VII Summit: -

Date:  6/2/2014 
Strategy to Combat Transnational Organized Crime
- In July 2011, the White House announced the Strategy to Combat Transnational Organized Crime to build, balance, and integrate the tools to combat transnational organized crime and related threats to U.S. national security – and to urge the United States’ partners to do the same.
- The strategy proposes 56 priority actions, starting with ones the United States can take within its borders to lessen the impact of transnational crime domestically and on the United States’ foreign partners. Other actions seek to enhance U.S. intelligence; protect the financial system and strategic markets; strengthen interdiction, investigations, and prosecutions; disrupt the drug trade and its facilitation of other transnational threats; and build international cooperation.
Military Cooperation on Transnational Organized Crime
- Beginning in January 2012, the U.S. military and its partners in the Western Hemisphere and Europe launched Operation Martillo, a joint effort targeting illicit trafficking routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus.
- Operation Martillo is a critical component of the U.S. government’s coordinated interagency regional security strategy to counter transnational organized crime in the Americas. Fourteen countries are participating: Belize, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Guatemala, Honduras, the Netherlands, Nicaragua, Panama, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Chile has also contributed to the operation.
Paragraphs: 5 Paragraphs VII Summit: -

Date:  6/2/2014 
Interagency Task Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons
- In March 2012, President Obama established the Interagency Task Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons. The task force is committed to furthering U.S. efforts to eradicate trafficking in persons and it draws on tools ranging from law enforcement and victim service provisions, to public awareness building and diplomatic pressure. The task force also increased U.S. government partnerships with a broad coalition of local communities, faith-based, and non-governmental organizations, schools, and businesses.
Paragraphs: 9 Paragraphs VII Summit: -

Date:  6/2/2014 
Convention on Illicit Trafficking in Firearms (CIFTA)
- The ratification of the Inter-American Convention against the Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms, Ammunition, Explosives and other Related Materials (CIFTA) is a priority for the Obama administration.
? The United States has offered technical assistance to a variety of countries to trace illicit firearms and control, store, or destroy excess national stockpiles. Through the OAS, the United States provided more than $1 million for the provision of marking equipment to countries in the hemisphere, increasing hemispheric capability to trace firearms and identify illicit trafficking routes and suppliers.
- The United States has signed eTrace agreements with all seven countries in Central America, and fourteen of the fifteen countries in the Caribbean. Expanding eTrace participation throughout the hemisphere is a priority for the U.S. government.
Paragraphs: 75 Paragraphs VII Summit: -

Date:  6/15/2010 
Caribbean Basin Security Dialogue:
• President Obama announced a multiyear regional citizen safety initiative with the Caribbean, including $45 million this year.
• The United States and the Caribbean held successful technical security meetings in 2009, one in Suriname in May, and a second
in Barbados in August, a third in the Dominican Republic in November, and a fourth in Washington this past April.
• The Inaugural U.S.-Caribbean Security Cooperation Dialogue will be held in Washington on May 27, 2010. All members of CARICOM, the Dominican Republic, and partner nation observers (the EU, the U.K., France, Spain, the Netherlands, Canada and Colombia) will be invited to the Dialogue.

Public Security Cooperation:
• President Obama asked the Attorney General and Secretary of Homeland Security to meet with all of their counterparts in the hemisphere to address violent crime in our communities.
• Attorney General Holder met with his CARICOM counterparts in Barbados in May, and met with hemispheric counterparts at the OAS REMJA in February 2010. the Department of Justice led the U.S. delegation to the second Ministers of Public Security of the Americas meeting in the Dominican Republic in November 2009.

Merida Initiative:
• The Merida Initiative is an unprecedented partnership between the United States and Mexico to fight organized crime and associated violence while furthering respect for human rights and the rule of law. Based on principles of shared responsibility, mutual trust, and respect for sovereign independence, our efforts have built confidence that is transforming our bilateral relationship.
• Merida was conceived in 2007 as a multi-year, $1.4 billion effort. The United States Congress has appropriated $1.3 billion since the program’s inception in 2008.
....continue
Source: REPORT OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT ON IMPLEMENTATION OF MANDATES FROM THE FIFTH SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS (United States 2010)
Paragraphs: 71 Paragraphs VII Summit: -

Date:  6/15/2010 
Convention on Illicit Trafficking in Firearms (CIFTA):

• President Obama announced that ratification of CIFTA is a priority for his Administration, and he offered technical assistance
to trace illicit firearms and control, store, or destroy excess national stockpiles.

• The United States provided the OAS a $1 million grant to provide marking equipment to states in the hemisphere in order to
increase hemispheric capability to trace frearms and identify illicit trafficking routes and suppliers.

• The United States signed eTrace agreements with all seven Central American states, and fourteen of the fifteen Caribbean states.
Expanding eTrace participation throughout the hemisphere is a priority for 2010 and will be aided by the introduction of a Spanish
version of the eTrace software in 2010.
• The United States has assessed and offered stockpile management and destruction assistance to a number of states in Latin
America and the Caribbean.

Source: REPORT OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT ON IMPLEMENTATION OF MANDATES FROM THE FIFTH SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS (United States 2010)
Paragraphs: 75 Paragraphs VII Summit: -

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