Lessons Plans

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Context Clues

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Rhashanna Curry
  • Number of views: 54
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Context Clues
Students’ age range: 10-12
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Deciphering Word Meaning Using Context Clues
 
Description: The students will read short passages with nonsensical words attached. Each group will be given a different passage to examine. The students will work collaboratively to decode the meaning of the nonsense Word. They will apply comprehension skills to complete this task. Students will make deductions based on the information given. Students will also complete a formative assessment to ensure that students have grasped onto concepts taught.

Slavery

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Kellie Brown
  • Number of views: 43
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Slavery
Students’ age range: 12-14
Main subject: Social studies
Topic: Slave Resistance
 
Description: Teacher will:
Have students watch a short video of slavery. After watching the video the teacher will ask students to express their thoughts on what they watched
Discuss with the class how slaves resisted enslavement.

Additionally, the teacher will discuss with students the slave revolt in Exuma. How it came about, Who was involved and was it successful?

Instruct students pretend to be slave during the slave revolt in Exuma. Draw a map of an escape route. The map must have all of the parts of a map.
Have students as a class role play the Pompey Revolt

Conservation of the Queen Conch (Strombus gigas)

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Ricardo Johnson
  • Number of views: 82
  • 0 Comments
Conservation of the Queen Conch (Strombus gigas)
Students’ age range: 12-14
Main subject: Sciences
Topic: The Queen Conch
 
Description: Introduction: Class opens with a display of an array of conch products: Conch shell jewelry, lamps and picture frames, conch fritters, conch salad and pictures of conch dishes. Students are intrigued by the natiive delights and the chance of a tastey sample by the end of the class. Students are allowed 60 seconds to browse the display as the teacher gives verbal highlights. Teacher asks open-ended questions to spark student interest and allude to what is to come.

Development: Students are instucted to form groups of three’s and identify a Reader, Scribe and Presenter. Printed instructions for the activities are shared with each group
• Teacher immediately leads the class into watching the video clip as students watch intently.
• Keeping the momentum, Teacher checks students prior knowledge of the value of the Queen Conchs as food and for income by asking 2 or 3 students close-ended questions.
• Teacher briefly reviews the written instructions, then releases the groups to work.
• As students work in their groups, Teacher offers support and encouragement to groups if needed.
• Twenty minutes are allowed for the activity, then students are asked to stop.
• Each group is given 2-minutes to briefly share their work

Comprehension

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Kasata Phillips- Riley
  • Number of views: 45
  • 0 Comments
Comprehension
Students’ age range: 12-14
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Figurative Language
 
Description: Step 1: Students will be given sentence strip. Students will be given two minutes to walk around and find their group members based on the sentence they were given. Students will sit with their members.

Step 2: Using the following question students will justify the decisión,
a. Why did you choose to associate yourself with the others in your group?
b. What was the similiarity between your sentence and the sentences of your group members?


Step 3: Each group will be given a title card. Each title card has a figurative device on it. Example metaphor, personification. Teacher will ensure that the card matches the sentence given. Using the similiarities for sentences given as a guide, students will determine the definition on the title card given. Each group will share their understanding.

Step 4: Students will be given textbooks, “English For All Bk 1”. Using the text students will read to get more information about the title card (figuative device).

Step 5: Using the fish bowl strategy students will share what they found out about the figurative device they were assigned. Each group will take turn contributing to the discussion by given a description of the figurative device assigned or listening to classmates giving the description.

Step:6 Using PREZI, teacher will present a short summary of the figurative devices covered in class. Examples will be given and selected students will take turn to identify the figurative device and justify answer given.

Step 7: Each group will be given a poem. After Reading the poem, students will identify the figurative devices used by the poet. One representative from each group will share answers with the class.



The treatment of Racism in text To Kill A Mockingbird

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Teri Ann Paisley
  • Number of views: 108
  • 0 Comments
The treatment of Racism in text To Kill A Mockingbird
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: How Writer Develops Theme of Racism
 
Description: Step 1
Students will watch a clip of a popular trial involving a black man and a white woman. Students will discuss what impact the race of the defendant and victim had on the outcome of the trial. Students will be asked to compare the issue on the video clip to the situation described in the novel To Kill A Mockingbird.

Step 2
Students will in pairs discuss how racism is shown (a) in 2018 and (b) in 1950 and discuss which era was better/worse and give reasons for their response. Students will be told to google search 'Black lives matter' and explain the reason behind the movement.

Step 3
Students will use graphic organizer to detail the steps that lead up to selected characters being treated unfairly because of their race. Students will listen as a section of the text is read and discuss how the think the character should have responded.

Step 4
Students will listen to clips of various civil rights advocates using their smartphones to identify them and make comments on the ways in which those people would have responded to the situation faced by the characters in the text. Students will identify specific examples of racism and the response of selected characters and give reasons for their responses.
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