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Comprehenion

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Angelita Robinson
  • Number of views: 50
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Comprehenion
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Levels of Comprehension
 
Description: The approach I will use to carry out the lesson is the Socratic Seminar approach. In this time-honored technique, I will ask a series of questions that lead the students to examine the validity of an opinion or belief. This is a powerful teaching method because it actively engages the learner and forces critical thinking. The method is also dramatic and entertaining, and it triggers lively classroom discussion.
Students will read about the three different levels of comprehension. They will also analyze the information and take notes.
Students will then be divided into two circles. The inner circle will read aloud what is literal comprehension and discusses the information for 15 minutes, while the outer group observes.
The outer circle will then evaluate the inner circle’s definition of literal comprehension and provide feedback to the inner circle.
Students will switch roles for the other levels of comprehension. Students will be given a passage with questions that falls under the three levels of comprehension.
Questions will fall under Bloom’s Taxonomy: remembering, understanding, and applying. Students will recall direct information from the passage, they will then have to explain base on understanding then they will have to apply the information in new ways or other situation known as transfer of knowledge.
Each circle will answer the questions from the passage and discuss with each other.




Briefly describe the lesson including the steps you followed during implementation. (700 words max):

The approach I will use to carry out the lesson is the Socratic Seminar approach. In this time-honored technique, I will ask a series of questions that lead the students to examine the validity of an opinion or belief. This is a powerful teaching method because it actively engages the learner and forces critical thinking. The method is also dramatic and entertaining, and it triggers lively classroom discussion.
Students will read about the three different levels of comprehension from powerpoint and also research on their phones. They will also analyze the information and take notes.
Students will then be divided into two circles. The inner circle will read aloud what is literal comprehension and discusses the information for 15 minutes, while the outer group observes.

Location of classroom objects using prepositions

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Shirley Bovell
  • Number of views: 205
  • 0 Comments
Location of classroom objects using prepositions
Students’ age range: 12-14
Main subject: Foreign languages
Topic: Donde Esta
 
Description: I started the lesson by greeting the students and stating the objectives to be achieved. Then, I modeled Total Physical Response (TPR) expressing positional terms in the target language using (delante de, detrás de, debajo de, al lado de and encima de) while encouraging whole class participation. Next, they viewed a video using Spanish prepositions and were encouraged to repeat using the target language.

The students did the following in their learning activities:

• Viewed and read flash cards illustrating prepositions in Spanish and English.
• Responded to the question ¿dónde está? by expressing estoy with a Spanish preposition (and the student name) e.g. (estoy delante de Jasara). Multiple students were given the
opportunity to respond.
• Reviewed vocabulary related to preposition from the text book (page 129)
• Worked in groups to correctly match and sequence a set of flash cards in English and Spanish.
• Introduced está by using a student as a example. (Maria está detrás de la mesa).
• Specific students called other students and asked them to hold up their flash card and state where the person was giving appropriate responses in Spanish.
• Completed a written exercise by writing the correct preposition to fill the blanks.
• Students were assessed in the following ways:

In oral/written form to test correct expression and pronunciation while engaging with their peers and by completing a written exercise using prepositions appropriately.

The lesson ended with the students playing “Simon Dice”.

Making reservations at a hotel

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: TANYA MORGAN
  • Number of views: 52
  • 0 Comments
Making reservations at a hotel
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Foreign languages
Topic: Has quedado en un hotel?
 
Description: Double Session 1: Methodology

1. Teacher will greet and welcome students upon their return to class from the Easter Break.
2. As a warm up activity, students will be told to state one thing they did alone, as well as one thing they did with someone during the break.
3. Students will be issued the handout on making reservations. They will be allowed to work in pairs and will be given some guiding questions to which they must respond after /during their reading.
1. How long does the guest plan to stay at the hotel?
2. What special request does he make?
3. Why does he make this request?
4. What payment arrangements does the hotel require?
5. What instructions does the receptionist give him?
4. The students and teacher will review the questions. Students will note the highlighted vocabulary from the passage.
5. The teacher will then draw students’ focus to directions. (vocabulary can be found on page 26 of the Viva 4). The class will explore ways of asking as well as stating locations of various places around the hotel. (This is to allow the students to become familiar with the hotel vocabulary items.)

Useful vocabulary
1. Review how to give directions using Commands. Review vocabulary:
Doblar, torcer(ue), continuar, seguir, ir, conducir/manejar, caminar, tomar, todo recto, por (along/through/by/past), calle arriba/abajo, al/hasta el final de la calle, en la esquina, a la derecha/izquierda, a..cuadras, esta/ se queda/ se ubica/se sitúa, esta ubicado/situado, como se llega a.., por donde puedo llegar a...


Homework
Students will be given the following situations as practice.
1. You are at a hotel and the receptionist gives you two directions to get to your room. What does she say?
2. You want to find out where is the closest Cambio to the hotel. What do you ask the receptionist?
3. The door to the elevator is on the ground floor. How do you tell your friend this?

Single Session
OBJECTIVES: Students should be able to:

1. Complete a listening activity from the ¿Cuál es?

a. The teacher will greet and settle the class. Students will be allowed to prepare to complete a listening.
b. Students will complete the listening activity. New vocabulary items will be taken from the exercise and students will note these.



Double Session 2

OBJECTIVES: Students should be able to:

1. Make reservations at a hotel.
2. Discuss problems that may arise when one travels.
3. Read and discuss the accounts of three women who experienced travel problem.
4. Report on problems that they experienced when travelling.

a. Teacher will greet and settle the students.
b. Using vocabulary items from the passage given to the students in the previous class, the students will be exposed to expressions used when making reservations. Thes...

Critical Thinking

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: karen cash
  • Number of views: 110
  • 0 Comments
Critical Thinking
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Reading Comprehension and Writing Skills
 
Description: Introduce the topic of finding the main idea in a story by showing Reading Strategies. After watching, discuss what students learned about main ideas and supporting details. Ask them: What was the main idea of the pyramid segment? What are supporting details? How are they used in a story? Talk about books the students have read or movies they have seen in the classroom. What were the main ideas of these stories? What information did supporting details provide?
Read a news story to the class. First, ask students to listen for the main idea and supporting details. Discuss the story with the students. What was the main idea? What were some supporting details?
Divide students into small groups and give each one several newspapers. Tell students that they will choose at least four stories that everyone in the group will read. If newspapers are unavailable have students choose stories from the online news sources or from your newspaper's Web site. Explain to students that they should identify the main idea and at least two supporting details in each of the stories. Have students number and cut out the stories, and give each group member a different story to read; tell students to write the number and the story headline on their writing paper. Explain that students should write the main idea and at least two supporting details directly under the number and headline. Once students finish with their own story, have them switch with a member of their group and repeat the process. They will to repeat the process until all members of the group have read all four stories.
Hold a group discussion about the stories. Ask students to share some main ideas and supporting details. What kinds of information did they learn? If students identified different main ideas for the same story, have them explain their choice and ask the group to reread that particular story. Make sure all students have a firm understanding of a story's main idea.
Ask volunteers to share some information their group learned from reading the news stories. Talk about the stories and the main ideas. For stories that may have been particularly difficult to read or understand, read them aloud have the class try to identify the main ideas.

Transport

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Rochelle Harris
  • Number of views: 41
  • 0 Comments
Transport
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Sciences
Topic: transport in man
 
Description: Main activity: (Explore, Explain, Elaborate)

• Students’ attention will be focused on the concept of a ‘system’ by asking questions that will establish the presence of and the need for a transport system
• How do you move from one room to another at school? Walking or running?
• How would you get from your house to your friend’s house down your street? Walking, riding bicycle, running?
• Suppose you wanted to carry a basket of mangoes from your house or school to downtown Kingston, how would you get there easily?
• How do you travel with your bag of books from home to school each day? (Car, bus, truck, train) depending on how far you are from Kingston or school.

• Students will be asked the following questions:
• Does the car/bus/train travel along the same route each time?
• How often does it travel each day?
• Are you the only person travelling on the bus/car/train each time?
• How many buses do you think are on your bus route?

• The words ‘bus system’ will be discussed. Students will suggest what a bus system means, how it works, ad why it is important.
• Students will consider that in the same way that people need a bus/train/plane system to carry them and their things, each person’s body needs a system that can carry the things the body cells need from one point to another
• Students will be asked
• Do you think an animal such as man or a rabbit needs a transport system?
• Would a plant such as corn or grass or mango tree also need a transport system?

• This will allow students to understand the concept that a complex organism needs a transport system so that cells deep inside the body can get water, food, gases and wastes can be taken away.
• A demonstration will be done with paper and a dye solution. See instructions attached.
• Following the discussion, students will be asked to imagine themselves sitting in a bath tub filled with food, what would happen? They will be asked the following questions
• What happened to the food in the tub?
• Was any absorbed or diffused into the body? Why?
• What type of organism are you, complex or simple?
• The students will be told that the body cells of a complex living organism can only get food if it is carried or transported to them via tubes.
• Students will view a chart/model of the heart. Students will then be called on randomly to label the structures using word strips provided
• After labelling the heart students will review how blood flows in the heart and what is meant by double circulation
• Students will form teams and respond to questions on circulation and immunity from a biology game show, the questions will facilitate open discussion for further explanation and development of critical thinking
• Students will then review transport in plants in the form of a quiz.


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