Lessons Plans

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The Root of Conflict

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Katie Minnis
  • Number of views: 81
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The Root of Conflict
Students’ age range: 12-14
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Internal and External Conflict
 
Description: FIRST SESSION. Teacher will display four photos that depict the four types of conflict- a person in a storm, persons involved in a fender bender, character looking at a poor grade with a confused look on her face and finally. Discussion on what is happening in each photo. The word conflict and its definition is written on the board. Volunteers are asked to explain how each picture depicts a conflict and the party or parties involved in the conflict. The words internal and external conflict are written on the board. Discussion on how the conflicts discussed earlier were internal and external. Students watch the video clip of the Lion King. In small groups, they are asked to identify the conflict, parties involved and how the conflict is resolved. A representative from each small group present their thoughts on the conflict.
SECOND SESSION. Students placed in four groups and given a a piece of paper with a type of conflict to role play. Students role play the conflicts after which classmates discuss the conflict. Class reads the short story, Brer Bouki and Brer Rabbi and the Sperrit House as teacher asks the students to make note of what they think may be evidence of conflicts in the story.

Analyzing Poetry using Critical Thinking Skills

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Marshalee Laing
  • Number of views: 79
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Analyzing Poetry  using Critical Thinking Skills
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Themes for English B by Langston Huges
 
Description: Students were asked to :
1. Read the poem prior to being taught as well as do a research on the author Langston Huges
2. Identify the image of Langston Hughes during delivery of the lesson and share information found about him as a result of their research.
3. Teacher will review the poem in the form of whole group discussion
4. Students guided by teacher will share their opinion on at least one literary device coming from the poem

Characterization in The Skin I'm In by Sharon Flake

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Leonard Roberts
  • Number of views: 65
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Characterization in The Skin I'm In by Sharon Flake
Students’ age range: 12-14
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Characterization
 
Description: Students will utilize their existing knowledge of plot, conflict and charácter. Working in groups of threes they will extract from the text the major factors influencing Maleeka Madison’s development throughot the course of the story.
I will supervise the progress of each froup to ensure their steady progress.
Each group will compose a Powerpoint presentation to be presented to the class next sesión.

Critical Thinking

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: karen cash
  • Number of views: 105
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Critical Thinking
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Reading Comprehension and Writing Skills
 
Description: Introduce the topic of finding the main idea in a story by showing Reading Strategies. After watching, discuss what students learned about main ideas and supporting details. Ask them: What was the main idea of the pyramid segment? What are supporting details? How are they used in a story? Talk about books the students have read or movies they have seen in the classroom. What were the main ideas of these stories? What information did supporting details provide?
Read a news story to the class. First, ask students to listen for the main idea and supporting details. Discuss the story with the students. What was the main idea? What were some supporting details?
Divide students into small groups and give each one several newspapers. Tell students that they will choose at least four stories that everyone in the group will read. If newspapers are unavailable have students choose stories from the online news sources or from your newspaper's Web site. Explain to students that they should identify the main idea and at least two supporting details in each of the stories. Have students number and cut out the stories, and give each group member a different story to read; tell students to write the number and the story headline on their writing paper. Explain that students should write the main idea and at least two supporting details directly under the number and headline. Once students finish with their own story, have them switch with a member of their group and repeat the process. They will to repeat the process until all members of the group have read all four stories.
Hold a group discussion about the stories. Ask students to share some main ideas and supporting details. What kinds of information did they learn? If students identified different main ideas for the same story, have them explain their choice and ask the group to reread that particular story. Make sure all students have a firm understanding of a story's main idea.
Ask volunteers to share some information their group learned from reading the news stories. Talk about the stories and the main ideas. For stories that may have been particularly difficult to read or understand, read them aloud have the class try to identify the main ideas.

The treatment of Racism in text To Kill A Mockingbird

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Teri Ann Paisley
  • Number of views: 103
  • 0 Comments
The treatment of Racism in text To Kill A Mockingbird
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: How Writer Develops Theme of Racism
 
Description: Step 1
Students will watch a clip of a popular trial involving a black man and a white woman. Students will discuss what impact the race of the defendant and victim had on the outcome of the trial. Students will be asked to compare the issue on the video clip to the situation described in the novel To Kill A Mockingbird.

Step 2
Students will in pairs discuss how racism is shown (a) in 2018 and (b) in 1950 and discuss which era was better/worse and give reasons for their response. Students will be told to google search 'Black lives matter' and explain the reason behind the movement.

Step 3
Students will use graphic organizer to detail the steps that lead up to selected characters being treated unfairly because of their race. Students will listen as a section of the text is read and discuss how the think the character should have responded.

Step 4
Students will listen to clips of various civil rights advocates using their smartphones to identify them and make comments on the ways in which those people would have responded to the situation faced by the characters in the text. Students will identify specific examples of racism and the response of selected characters and give reasons for their responses.
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