Lessons Plans

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Social Issues of The Bahamas

  • 25 April 2018
  • Posted by: Victoria Smith
  • Number of views: 316
  • 0 Comments
Social Issues of The Bahamas
Students’ age range: 10-12
Main subject: Social studies
Topic: Crime
 
Description: Discussion / Debate
Think Out-Loud discussions to talk about their experiences
Text-to-self: to engage the students prior knowledge of the different kind of crimes that plague The Bahamas

An Educational Deal to Receive a Well Treatment

  • 25 April 2018
  • Posted by: Celeste Fueyo
  • Number of views: 173
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  An Educational Deal to Receive a Well Treatment
Students’ age range: 16-18
Main subject: Not specified
Topic: Human rights in education
 
Description: Introduction Briefly summarize learning from the previous lesson. Key points: • What is a right? ‘A moral or legal entitlement to have or do something.’
• Discuss the link between rights and responsibility. Explain that rights go hand in hand with responsibilities. When you have a right, you also have a responsibility to respect that others have that right.
• Explain that human rights are the rights we have as human beings. They belong to all of us, regardless of who we are or where we live, and they cannot be taken away.
1- Introduce the concept and history of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights by watching the video in Youtube
• Show students the slides and briefly explain how the Universal Declaration of Human Rights came into being. Ask students to brainstorm why the Universal Declaration might have been important.
Explain to students that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights protects our fundamental human rights, and it is important to know what these rights are.
• Explore and discuss the meaning of the rights in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
• As a class, consider the pictures presented in the activity.
• Explain that each of the four rights displayed on the slide are rights from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
• Ask students to choose which of the four rights displayed is being represented in the picture. Explain to students that the picture may show a right being respected or not respected.
Who do you think should be responsible for upholding the rights in the Universal Declaration? Look at these
rights from the Universal Declaration and drag and drop the group (or groups) that should make sure that the
right is protected and respected.
No one shall be subject to arbitrary arrest, detention or exile.
Nobody has the right to put you in prison, to keep you there, or to send you away from your country unjustly, or
without a good reason.
Judges and the Law Courts / Community / Businesses / Government / Individuals / The United Nations

Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security.
You have the right to live, and to live in freedom and safety.
Police / Community / Your Family / Government / Judges and the Law Courts / Individuals

Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion
You have the right to have your own religion or belief. This includes the right to change your religion or belief
if you want, to practice your religion either on your own or with other people and to peacefully express your
beliefs in teaching, practice and worship.
Community / the Media / Government / Individuals / Churches / The United Nations

Onomatopoeia

  • 25 April 2018
  • Posted by: Kimberly Straughn
  • Number of views: 2351
  • 0 Comments
Onomatopoeia
Students’ age range: 10-12
Main subject: Arts education
Topic: Literary Device
 
Description: The teacher will demonstrate to the students what she wants them to do in class by listening attentively to the recordings of at least three sounds that animals or objects make. She will write the words that imitates the sounds the animals or things make next to the picture of that animal or thing. After demonstrating she will ask the students if they understand what it is they are suppose to do. If they say no she will demonstrate for them again until they understand how the activity is to be done in class. Once each student understands they will be listening attentively to the recordings to write a word that imitates the sound of an animal or thing next to the respective picture.
After completing this activity. The teacher will be using her chart to explain what is onomatopoeia focusing on its definition and examples. After explaining the students will be writing out the definition on onomatopoeia along with examples from the chart on the board to develop fine motor skills.
The teacher will be telling the students the purposes for writing the notes. Then the students will be using the notes written from the chart as a reference to complete various tasks.
As soon as this activity is completed. The teacher will give a partner in each group various comics. The students will be reading the first comic with Garfield aloud and then a comic called The Bully aloud to see the usage of onomatopoeia in everyday creative writing.
During their reading the students will be locating carefully the onomatopoetic words that imitates various sounds to show their comprehension of onomatopoeia by circling the words.
After the reading the teacher will be asking the students why they think writers use onomatopoetic words during their writing. During this time the students will be discussing the writer’s purpose for using onomatopoeia in various texts.
When the discussion is completed the students will be working cooperatively with members in a group to demonstrate the understanding of onomatopoeia by writing the word that imitates the sound each creature or thing makes in everyday life underneath the picture presented.
After completing this activity the students will be creating a comic strip containing onomatopoetic words to apply their knowledge of onomatopoeia and how it enhances writing and captivates the reader.

The Dentist

  • 25 April 2018
  • Posted by: Natasha Barrow
  • Number of views: 764
  • 0 Comments
The Dentist
Students’ age range: 00-04
Main subject: Social studies
Topic: The dentist helps us to keep our teeth clean and healthy
 
Description: 1. Students will then be introduced to the modified socratic seminar. They will be made aware of the procedure and rules.
2. I will model a simple discussion with another child or adult, attentive listening and responding.
3. Have students model using the modified socratic seminar.
4. Students will told that they will view a short video clip entitled “Learn How To Be Well”.
5. They will make predictions about what they will see in the video.
6. Students will be invited to view the video and to listen attentively to it.
7. At this point, students willbe allowed to say whether their predictions were confirmed or not.
8. They will then be asked to view the video again and think of any questions they may have regarding what they saw or heard.
9. Students will be assisted in recording their questions.
10. Students will participate in socratic seminar about video seen.

Leadership

  • 25 April 2018
  • Posted by: Marjorie McDonald
  • Number of views: 516
  • 0 Comments
Leadership
Students’ age range: 16-18
Main subject: Not specified
Topic: Leadership Styles
 
Description: Step 1 : students were shown stimulus material to spark interest. These were pictures of various leaders (locally and internationally). Students were asked to identify them and say what they had in common.
Step 2: Students went on to differentiate between a leader and a manager and to discuss the importance of critical thinking, listening and communication skills to the leader
Step 3: students were asked to think about a leader and the characteristics of that leader. They were asked to describe that person and the characteristics noted. Each type of leadership style was labelled as students describe various leaders. At this point students were asked to arrange class in the fish bowl to discuss what circumstances would warrant the use of a particular leadership style. This was done for 20 minutes. Point were noted and teacher emphasized important points coming from the discussion.
Step 4: Students went on to discuss using the same formation (fish bowl) the role of leaders.
Step 5: Important points from the discussion was highlighted and emphasis place on the objective points
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