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UN Trust Fund to End Violence Against Women: Generating Sustainability

UN Trust Fund to End Violence Against Women: Generating Sustainability

The 2017 Annual Report of the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women, published in 2018, highlights some of the activists and movements that worked towards the rights of women and girls. It also serves as a testimony of the achievement of some of their grantees. The UN Trust Fund managed 120 projects in 80 countries addressing and preventing violence against women and children and benefitting over 340,000 women and girls directly. Over 45,000 women and girls who beneficiated were survivors of violence. An estimated 35 percent of women in the world have experienced physical and/or sexual violence.

Violence Prevention & Response as a Part of Emergencies and Health Programming in Haiti

Croix-Rouge Haitienne - Canadian Red Cross

  • 16 March 2018
  • Posted by: Nicolas Devia
  • Number of views: 326
  • 0 Comments
Violence Prevention & Response as a Part of Emergencies and Health Programming in Haiti

The 2010 earthquake in Haiti left the already impoverished country in a state of crisis. As years passed by reconstruction seemed like an unattainable task and violence, crime and poverty where taking away the happiness and hopes of the Haitian people. The destruction of the education system and therefore the weakening of the system meant a condition of ignorance on many topics, being sexual education one of the most affected. When institutions can’t cope the needs of the citizens and there’s a misconception of what sexuality means, sex is then transformed as an exchangeable good. Women, adolescents and girls found themselves in an atmosphere of fear, uncertainty and impunity which normalizes violence in all of its forms, being sexual violence the most relevant one. The work of the Canadian and Haitian Red Cross has been to put in place cultural programs that de-normalize violence and empower young leaders to be agents of transformation in their communities.

STOP THE VIOLENCE IN LATIN AMERICA: A Look at Prevention from Cradle to Adulthood

Laura Chioda

  • 9 March 2018
  • Posted by: Nicolas Devia
  • Number of views: 253
  • 0 Comments
STOP THE VIOLENCE IN LATIN AMERICA: A Look at Prevention from Cradle to Adulthood

The present report studies the dynamics of crime and violence in the region: their causes, characteristics and rationale, as well as the policies designed to combat them. Rather than being a homogeneous phenomenon throughout the region, violence and crime rates vary drastically between States and even more at the subnational level. Small municipalities account for the majority of offenses committed in the whole region. Gender and age determine as well the probability of engaging in criminal/violent activities (or being a victim of them): were young, male citizens find themselves into the most vulnerable populations. Contrary to the common thinking, poverty per se doesn’t lead to higher rates of violence and/or crime. On the contrary, economic development at a certain point increases the benefits for offenders to engage in criminal activities. Studies show that policies focused on reactive response to criminal activities and to the augmentation of incarcerated population are ineffective and sometimes could backfire. Instead, comprehensive policies that understand the heterogeneous and complex nature of crime by focusing on prevention, often show better results.

Understanding Violence

Created by Emory University

Understanding Violence

Violence is a leading cause of death, disability and health care use worldwide. Violence is a complex problem and can only be understood and reduced though a multidisciplinary approach. This course introduces you to experts who study different forms of violence and we will discuss the various causes of violence. You will also learn about efforts to reduce violence and engage in a day of compassion.

 

Homicides in Guatemala: The Challenge and Lessons of Disaggregating Gang-Related and Drug Trafficking-Related Murders

Homicides in Guatemala: The Challenge and Lessons of Disaggregating Gang-Related and Drug Trafficking-Related Murders

Discerning the motives and actors behind the scourge of homicides in the Northern Triangle region is too often left to high level officials who routinely attribute the vast majority of homicides to drug trafficking organizations and street gangs without necessarily assessing the data. While that is the politically expedient answer, it seems to be too easily accepted. 

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