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STOP THE VIOLENCE IN LATIN AMERICA: A Look at Prevention from Cradle to Adulthood

Laura Chioda

  • 9 March 2018
  • Posted by: Nicolas Devia
  • Number of views: 244
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STOP THE VIOLENCE IN LATIN AMERICA: A Look at Prevention from Cradle to Adulthood

The present report studies the dynamics of crime and violence in the region: their causes, characteristics and rationale, as well as the policies designed to combat them. Rather than being a homogeneous phenomenon throughout the region, violence and crime rates vary drastically between States and even more at the subnational level. Small municipalities account for the majority of offenses committed in the whole region. Gender and age determine as well the probability of engaging in criminal/violent activities (or being a victim of them): were young, male citizens find themselves into the most vulnerable populations. Contrary to the common thinking, poverty per se doesn’t lead to higher rates of violence and/or crime. On the contrary, economic development at a certain point increases the benefits for offenders to engage in criminal activities. Studies show that policies focused on reactive response to criminal activities and to the augmentation of incarcerated population are ineffective and sometimes could backfire. Instead, comprehensive policies that understand the heterogeneous and complex nature of crime by focusing on prevention, often show better results.

Explaining Patterns of Urban Violence in Medellin, Colombia

Caroline Doyle

  • 20 February 2018
  • Posted by: Nicolas Devia
  • Number of views: 311
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Explaining Patterns of Urban Violence in Medellin, Colombia

Latin America is one of the world’s most violent regions, with 40 of the 50 most violent
cities, but with only 8% of the world’s population, and a staggering 33% of global homicides.
At the forefront of these high levels of violence are gangs that are more flexible and persistent than
previously thought. This paper provides a discussion on gangs in one Latin American city, Medellin,
Colombia, where different non-state groups have contributed to changing patterns of homicide rates.
The paper presents preliminary findings to show how, despite the city experiencing a 90% reduction
in homicide rates in less than 25 years, violent non-state groups have become embedded as part
and product of their environment, acting as coherent, logical and functional players, linked to the
structural inequalities and institutional fragility of the larger society.

Strengthening Child Protection

Evaluation of a systemic approach in Latin America and the Caribbean

  • 30 January 2018
  • Posted by: Nicolas Devia
  • Number of views: 542
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Strengthening Child Protection

The present report evaluates the results of World Vision’s strategy for violence against children in five countries of Latin America: Bolivia, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Nicaragua and Peru. The data shows all aspects of children and adolescents’ lives: from their experiences at home and school to the broad atmosphere of their communities. Changes in attitudes, perceptions, norms and laws are seen to be the key driving factors for the creation of safe spaces where children and adolescents can fully and freely develop. Taking into account that violence against children is a structural-caused phenomenon, all of the members of society have a share of responsibility in the issue, including children themselves. World Vision programs look for the empowerment of children to maximize their capacities of leadership and productivity, providing the tools for the future adults to be agents of change. In the meantime, families, government institutions, faith congregations and local communities must work together to enforce laws that prevent violence to happen and to modify the behavior of grown adults.

Contributions to Ending Violence against Children

Advocacy for Child Rights and Protection in Latin American and the Caribbean (2014-2016) / World Vision

  • 30 January 2018
  • Posted by: Nicolas Devia
  • Number of views: 516
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Contributions to Ending Violence against Children

The present report examines the cases of success of World Vision where advocacy led by the NGO paved the way to relevant changes in Latin American States’ legislations. In broad terms, more than 147’000.000 children of the region were impacted positively by these changes. Violent acts against children such as corporal punishment, bullying, child marriage, human trafficking, child labor and sexual violence were penalized and advances were made towards the application of those laws. An improvement of the conventions and codes’ enforcement methods was also an objective for the Organization. A total of 14 Countries were benefited by the support of World Vision: Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua and Peru.

VIOLENCE AGAINST CHILDREN

Public Perceptions in Latin America / IPSOS-World Vision

  • 29 January 2018
  • Posted by: Nicolas Devia
  • Number of views: 532
  • 0 Comments
VIOLENCE AGAINST CHILDREN

“VIOLENCE AGAINST CHILDREN & CHILD PROTECTION SYSTEMS” is a report presented by IPSON and the NGO World Vision on the public perceptions of child violence in Latin America and the Caribbean. Its objective is to assess and measure public opinion and awareness to violence against children, as well as to identify the main sources of information adults use to inform themselves on the topic. In general, the report helps both the organizations (public and private) and the civil society to understand their own perceptions of causes and consequences of child violence. Overall, it shows that the region is less sensitive to violence against children that prior years. This could be the result of the mix of various myths and misconceptions adults have on the threats to children. The fact that public institutions are discredited and not trusted as guarantors of children’s rights plays also a role in the reduced interest of the region to this topic.

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