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A Agenda Sobre Mulheres, Paz e Segurança no Contexto Latino-Americano

Desafios e Oportunidades

A Agenda Sobre Mulheres, Paz e Segurança no Contexto Latino-Americano

According to this publication, Latin American governments are lagging behind the rest of the world with the United Nations’ Security Council’s Agenda on Women, Peace and Security. The region has the highest homicide and feminicide rates in the world. Economic and gender inequality; organized crime; land disputes; and systemic violence are some of the factors that adds to the victimization in the region. The authors argue that national and regional laws will be insufficient in solving this issue; call for gender issues to be included in security agendas; and propose additional methods to fill the gap.

Firearms Trafficking in Honduras

InSight Crime and the Asociación para una Sociedad mas Justa

  • 9 April 2018
  • Posted by: Nicolas Devia
  • Number of views: 166
  • 0 Comments
Firearms Trafficking in Honduras

"Honduras does not produce weapons, but weapons are trafficked into the country in numerous ways. These vary depending on weapon availability in neighboring countries, demand in Honduras, government controls and other factors. They do not appear to obey a single strategic logic, other than that of evading detection, although many of them have a single origin. Nor does arms trafficking appear to be dominated by any one criminal group. In fact, arms trafficking appears to be as much a crime of opportunity for many individuals -- uniformed and civilian alike -- in Honduras as it is an established criminal activity for small and large groups of criminals, many of whom are also involved in other crimes such as international drug trafficking. The varied nature of the trade, the numerous means of trafficking weapons, and the shortfall in controls and regulatory agencies involved in policing it make this a very difficult crime to counter."

Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth: Preventing Violence and Harassment at School / Bullying and Youth Suicide: Breaking the Connection.

National Association of School Psychologists (NASP)

  • 14 March 2018
  • Posted by: Nicolas Devia
  • Number of views: 397
  • 0 Comments
Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth: Preventing Violence and Harassment at School / Bullying and Youth Suicide: Breaking the Connection.

Violence expresses itself through different forms depending on the life stage of a person. Bullying as a mean of discrimination is one of the most common violent practices found in schools all over the Americas. The difference between Bullying and other forms of violence consists in the systematic process of depreciation (and even de-humanization) of a student to the point the victim believes suicide is the only way out. As with other forms of violence, vulnerable communities such as the LGBTQ bear an unfair share of the consequences. The following two papers provide tools to school administrators and stake-holders for creating safe learning environments, in which vulnerable communities and different students can feel included. Though it may not cause the majority of violent deaths in the Americas, harassment in schools has profound and serious consequences for future generations and national economies.

Avoiding the Perfect Storm: Criminal Economies, Spoilers, and the Post-Conflict Phase in Colombia

Juan Carlos Garzón-Vergara

  • 21 February 2018
  • Posted by: Nicolas Devia
  • Number of views: 343
  • 0 Comments
Avoiding the Perfect Storm: Criminal Economies, Spoilers, and the Post-Conflict Phase in Colombia

The possibility of ending the armed conflict in Colombia will depend, to a large extent, on the state’s ability to prevent multiple criminal economies, and inhibit the actors who participate in them from damaging the implementation of the final peace agreements. This article analyzes criminal economies’ ability to destabilize and thereby damage the post-conflict phase, and identifies dilemmas the state must confront in responding to this situation. The article’s objective is to provide an analytical model to understand the complex relationship between actors involved in the peace process and criminal economies, and to thereby identify risks and possible models for intervention. The theoretical referent of this work is the discussion about peacebuilding in fragile states and literature that identifies organized crime as a spoiler. This is the first attempt to apply this perspective to Colombia, and to take the particular characteristics of the country into account while making comparisons with other countries that exhibit similar features in their own post-conflict and transitional phases. The article comes to the conclusion that in Colombia it is necessary to consider Interim Stabilization Measures, which allow the state to provide an effective response that takes advantage of
available resources without losing sight of the need to strengthen local institutions in the mid-term.

States of Fragility 2016 - Understanding Violence

  • 15 February 2017
  • Posted by: Jane Piazer
  • Number of views: 4688
  • 0 Comments
States of Fragility 2016 - Understanding Violence
The world is getting more violent, and violence is occurring in surprising places. Over the past 15 years, 3.34 billion people, or almost half of the world’s population, have been affected by violence. The number of violent conflicts is decreasing, but conflicts are killing more people.
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