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Implementation to the Confidence-Building Measures between Belize and Guatemala The purpose of the project is to continue to mediate and implement the confidence-building measures in the territorial dispute between Guatemala and Belize, supporting both the political-diplomatic process, as well as the OAS Office in the Adjacency Zone between Belize and Guatemala, in compliance with the Organization's mandate. The governments of Belize and Guatemala adopted a series of confidence-building measures aimed at strengthening the bilateral relationship and cooperation in key action areas; increasing community-to-community contacts; improving the living conditions of the local communities; and avoiding an escalation of tensions among civilians and security forces, and tasked the OAS Office in the Adjacency Zone to help them implement these measures.
Belize, GuatemalaDemocracy CARICOM, SICAProject$965
Inter-American Peace Forum

The Inter-American Peace Forum operates under the Peace Fund, in an effort to develop a series of activities aimed at promoting a culture of peace among the various sectors of the inter-American society. These are different types of programs, such as conferences and seminars on the subject of peace and conflict management; specialized reports and publications; the promotion of leadership, as well as other initiatives with a special emphasis on the peaceful resolution of conflicts and fostering a culture of respect, tolerance and harmony.

http://www.oas.org/sap/peacefund/interamerican/ 

Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, United States of America, Uruguay, VenezuelaDemocracy ALADI, CANADA, CARICOM, MEXICO, SICA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICAProject$0
Beyond the walls: Strengthening the management capabilities of the Honduras Prison System A chronic context of serious structural crisis is observed in the prison system. Penitentiary establishments are generally old complexes that do not have the appropriate infrastructure and lack the minimum technological security. They also do not have adequate rehabilitation and re-education spaces or a safe and healthy environment, both for the accommodation of detainees and prison officials themselves, so prison overcrowding has been a constant in Honduras over the past few decades. There is a clear willingness of the Honduran Government to make changes that will bring about a turn in the situation to address all these problems. However, the National Prison Institute does not have the necessary tools to guide in a coordinated and articulated manner the restructuring of the prison system and the implementation of the necessary programs to achieve its purpose of social reintegration of those who suffer a criminal conviction. At the request of the Honduran authorities, the DPS assists the Government of Honduras in achieving the objectives of social reintegration of those penned for justice, developing a Strategy for Strengthening the Functioning of the Prison System. At the end of the project, the Government of Honduras is expected to have important tools to move forward with the improvement of the services and programs offered by its prison system: a Strategy with the guidelines and the pathway to address the recommendations made in the assessments of its National Citizen Security System and an action plan with the concrete initiatives to be implemented to achieve a better functioning of the Honduran prison system. HondurasDemocracy SICAProject$103
Strengthening the capacity of civil registry agencies to enable legal recognition of self-defined gender identity in identity and identification documents in OAS member states

The project seeks to strengthen the access of civil registry agencies to knowledge and guidance to enable legal recognition of self-defined gender identity  on identification documents.  Even when there is no change in the national legal framework, civil registries can make modifications in their internal policies, processes and procedures to advance legal recognition of self-defined gender identity. By increasing knowledge of Inter-American and international human rights standards on the right to gender identity and their implications for civil registration and identification processes, and by providing access to good practices, expertise, practical experiences and recommendations from peers, civil registry agencies will be better equipped to spearhead changes in their internal policies, processes and procedures to advance legal recognition of gender identity.  

Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, United States of America, Uruguay, VenezuelaDemocracy ALADI, CANADA, CARICOM, MEXICO, SICA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICAProject$137
Improve the tools available to protect the rights to life and personal integrity of human rights defenders in Latin America.

In addition to the lack of investigation, prosecution and punishment of acts of violence against human rights defenders, which favors their repetition, the absence of policies that act against the factors that generate risk in the exercise of the function of defending human rights has been identified.

The analysis of the risk factors/origin of violence against defenders will make it possible to define precise recommendations and public policy guidelines so that national institutions in charge of their protection and those responsible for designing public policies can prepare and implement risk mitigation plans to improve the protection of defenders and prevent violence. This presupposes that States give the required priority and importance to the prevention of violence, that they accept the recommendations and that they have the will and resources necessary for their implementation. In addition, coordinated actions with the OHCHR, through the joint regional mechanism, will make it possible to advance in the evaluation, granting and implementation of precautionary measures. By improving the tools available, the IACHR will have helped to increase the protection of human rights defenders in the Americas, which is the ultimate goal of the project.Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

Argentina, Bahamas, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, VenezuelaHuman Rights ALADI, CARICOM, MEXICO, SICAProject$263
Promotion of Dialogue and Cooperation among the Judiciary to Advance in the Implementation of the Recommendations of the Committee of Experts of the MESICIC

The IACC is the Inter-American treaty through which the 34 member states of the OAS have committed to work together to prevent and combat corruption. Collaboration of the different Branches and agencies of government is crucial for effectively tackling corruption. For that reason, this project has sought to promote dialogue and opportunities for effective mutual cooperation between the Judiciary of the participating countries in order to increase the effectiveness in combating corruption, and the effective implementation of the Convention within the framework of the MESICIC.

In particular, the objective was to strengthen cooperation between the Judiciary in order to ensure the effectiveness of the measures and actions aimed at sanctioning and eradicating acts of corruption in the exercise of public functions. In addition, the project aimed at providing a platform for the Judiciaries to share, with their peers, developments and/or best practices related to strengthening the Judiciary in anticorruption efforts, and the implementation of the recommendations of the MESICIC that concern each of their States, as well as the opportunities for mutual cooperation in the fight against corruption. The Forum was organized for that purpose. This event promoted dialogue, opportunities for effective mutual cooperation and exchange of Best Practices among the Judiciary of the participating States. In particular, representatives from the Judiciary of Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Paraguay, and Spain attended the Forum.

Considering that not all the States were able to attend the Forum and the relevance of the issue, those countries that could not participate in the Forum were given the opportunity to provide information on the progress and best practices regarding the recommendations formulated to them by the Committee of Experts of the MESICIC, especially on issues related to the modernization of judicial systems, the role of information technology, and the training of judicial operators

Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Paraguay, PeruDemocracy ALADI, SICAProject$100
Promotion of dialogue and exchange among the youth of the Belize-Guatemala Adjacency Zone

=The purpose of the project is to promote a new mechanism for dialogue and exchange between young people in the Belize-Guatemala Adjacency Zone on issues of mutual interest. The project proposes a youth-led podcast to be run and operated in the OAS /AZ, within the Culture of Peace Program, which will serve as a platform for young people to share their experiences and ideas, and communicate with their peers and the community. usually. It will also allow them to show the reality of how the younger generation of the AZ works together for peace. The podcasts will highlight the positive dynamics and interactions between youth from both sides of the ZA, and their experiences with the Culture of Peace Program. Each podcast will cover a pre-selected topic and the sessions will alternate between English and Spanish. The project will help develop confidence, communication skills and foster dialogue and exchange between young people and the communities of the AZ. At the same time, it aims to reach a wider audience, through radio and website of the OAS Belize-Guatemala. The podcast will be facilitated by a renowned, bilingual journalist, and will be directed by two young people: one from Belize and the other from Guatemala. The two selected youth leaders will be provided journalistic tools, including workshops on how to conduct interviews and how to facilitate constructive exchange with a variety of participants. Given that this initiative will be part of the Culture of Peace Program, which is an integral project for the fulfillment of the OAS mandate - to support the promotion of confidence measures between Belize and Guatemala.

Belize, GuatemalaDemocracy CARICOM, SICAProject$138
Strengthening the Capacities of the Government of Costa Rica and host communities in the reception and integration of Migrants and Refugees

Costa Rica has been for several decades an important receiving country for Nicaraguan migrants. According to the 2011 Census, a total of 287,766 Nicaraguan migrants were residing in this country, representing 6.7% of the population of Costa Rica and 75% of the immigrant population. Most of this population was made up of labor migrants, and those who settled in Costa Rica during the Nicaraguan Revolution. These migratory flows are now being joined by people who have been fleeing Nicaragua as a result of the current political and humanitarian crisis that this country is facing.

In order to respond to these new challenges and support the communities affected by these recent phenomena of human mobility, this project will provide Costa Rica with: 1) Recommendations to national and sub-national authorities on the reception and integration of Nicaraguan migrants and refugees that allow the Costa Rican authorities to address these realities; 2) Knowledge of government officials, including officials of the Ministry of Labor and Social Security, members of the legislative branch, and members of the host communities regarding the reception and integration of migrants and refugees in order to provide better care for these populations; 3) Alternatives of socioeconomic integration to a group of Nicaraguan migrants and refugees and members of the host community. In this way, it will be possible to contribute to improving the care and protection of Nicaraguan migrants and refugees in Costa Rica.

Costa RicaHuman Rights SICAProject$637
OAS Working Group on Venezuela: addressing the Venezuelan political, economic, and social crisis in the region

The ongoing Venezuelan migrant and refugee crisis is unprecedented in the Hemisphere. At the end of 2020, more than 5.4 million Venezuelan migrants and refugees were recorded. If the human rights violations, the complex humanitarian crisis, lack of basic services, lack of freedoms and systematic violence continues, the number Venezuela continues could rise to 7 million in 2021, surpassing the Syrian exodus. Colombia (1.7 million), Peru (1 million), Chile (455 thousand), Ecuador (420 thousand) and Brazil (270 thousand) are the main countries receiving migrants. It should be noted that Argentina (180,000), the Dominican Republic (120,000), Panama (110,000) and Mexico (100,000) are also receiving more and more Venezuelan migrants, even during COVID19.

The OAS WORKING GROUP TO ADDRESS THE VENEZUELAN MIGRANT AND REFUGEE CRISIS IN THE REGION was formed in September 2018 with experts from the academic world and think tanks specialized in migration to identify and present recommendations to governments on how to respond and provide assistance and protection of Venezuelan migrants and refugees. Through visits and first-hand exchanges with migrants, this project has documented nearly 600 testimonies of forced migration, has addressed more than 400 forums and interviews, as well as published 10 reports as a result of visits to the region. participation of civil society and meetings of government authorities. Several of the recommendations made by the Working Group have been adopted by recipient countries to benefit hundreds of thousands of Venezuelan migrants and refugees.

 
Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, PeruDemocracy ALADI, CARICOMProject$1,482
Advancing Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development in OAS Member States through the Americas Competitiveness Exchanges (ACEs) Phase 2

Considering the low levels of innovation and entrepreneurship in LAC and the key factors known to promote innovation-driven sustainable economic growth and entrepreneurial ecosystems, the Project aims to support key stakeholders (decision-makers) from governments, private sector, and academia to: (i) improve knowledge on innovation and entrepreneurship by facilitating access to good practices on dynamic economic sectors of top ecosystems of the Americas; (ii) accelerate collaboration and partnership opportunities by expanding peer networks of leaders advancing innovation and entrepreneurship endeavors; and, iii) create a follow up mechanism to support the implementation of initiatives resulting from the ACE program.

The theory of change of the ACE program emphasizes access to knowledge and best practices, so leaders understand the drivers behind successful examples of public-private collaboration around innovation, entrepreneurship, technology and economic development initiatives, in the Americas and around the world. Leaders and communities from the ACE Community, with the knowledge and network provided by ACE, can become agents of further transformation to produce long-lasting, sustainable results, projects, partnerships and collaboration.

The ACE program will continue to promote access to knowledge, best practices and virtual mechanisms that allow to understand the stories behind successful examples of public-private collaboration around innovation, entrepreneurship, technology and economic development initiatives. The project will support the organization and implementation of ACE activities focused in improving knowledge, sharing innovative models and best practices.  Due to Covid-19, in-person visits and the traditional program could take place at least two the United States and two ACE editions outside the United States in other OAS Member/Observer States between 2020 and 2023.

A follow up mechanism to enhance the results of the ACE program will be developed. For example, to implement technical assistance (virtual and in-person), follow up activities, exchanges, mentoring, soft-landing guidance, R&D projects and other forms of support. This follow up mechanism will allow for better monitoring, reorient activities and efforts, as well as for timely interventions by the ACE Committee and project team to facilitate/accelerate projects, initiatives, collaboration opportunities, partnerships and endeavors which otherwise may fail to materialize. The focus will be on those initiatives that can serve as catalysts for sustainable inclusive economic development. The ACE program will continue to promote the role of women and youth as crucial for advancing inclusive economic development in each ACE.

 

Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, United States of America, Uruguay, VenezuelaHuman Rights ALADI, CANADA, CARICOM, MEXICO, SICA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICAProject$3,661
Program for Comprehensive Action against Antipersonnel Mines (AICMA – OAS)

Since 1993, the program has benefited ten Member States, amongst them: Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru, and Suriname. Seven countries have finished the destruction of their stockpiles, with one million land mines destroyed. Five countries have been declared land-mine-free, and more than 200,000 unexploded mines and ammunition have been cleared. Chile, Ecuador, and Peru have taken responsibility for their Action Programs against Antipersonnel Mines after initial assistance of the Program. Almost 2.000 landmine victims have been assisted through their rehabilitation and reintegration processes, and more than one million inhabitants in 1.500 communities have been educated in prevention. Currently, the program remains active in Colombia.

Colombia is the sixth country with more victims of landmines in the world. In 2015, it was the second after Afghanistan.

Since 1991, 26,000 events related to antipersonnel mines have been registered in the country.

These events have generated more than 11,000 victims, 7,000 of which are members of the public forces.

The Program form Comprehensive Action against Antipersonnel Mines in Colombia has accompanied the Colombian Government for 12 years in the process to increase humanitarian demining capacity through the evaluation and certification of military and civilian demining organizations.

ColombiaMultidimensional Security ALADIProject$23,228
Improved Disaster Risk Management for Ports in the Caribbean Given the enhanced magnitude, duration, and threat of natural hazards to which the Caribbean basin is particularly vulnerable, Port and Maritime authorities in the region need to fully understand both the range and complexity of the scenarios that could impact their businesses, trade and/or operations, as well as their role in case of disasters and complex emergencies. 

Each port should have a well-developed emergency operations plan (EOP) to address risks that could jeopardize the port and/or its operations.  The EOP must seek to increase the resilience of the Port and must be well integrated into the broader national emergency operations plan (NEOP). Caribbean EOP’s haven’t been updated for a decade and key port officers must be well acquainted with the latest risk management communication technology systems and protocols available within the sector to handle emergencies, as well as the positive impact on business continuity that its institutional adoption entails. Given the fact that 95% of the exported goods in Latin America and the Caribbean are operated by ports and acknowledging the economic dependence on trade and tourism of these nations, resiliency is vital as it directly correlates with business continuity and economic sustainability in the region. Therefore, it is in the best interests of both governments and the private sector to develop and be able to execute comprehensive, robust and effective plans that, in addition to human life, prioritize business continuity.

This project is expected to improve disaster risk management capabilities, including preparedness, response and recovery in four stages. First, conduct an assessment of specific vulnerabilities that have the potential to threaten or disrupt port and business operations during an event, whether natural or man-made so as to mitigate their impact. Second, based on this review, in collaboration with public and private strategic partners, draft a prototype EOP applicable to Caribbean Ports to address the risks posed by natural and man-made hazards to ports and port businesses. Third, in collaboration with partners, conduct workshops to train stakeholders on the implementation of the EOP (including disaster risk governance, disaster resilience, business continuity and recovery). Lastly, carry out table top exercises and simulations to identify areas of improvement and incorporate them into the draft EOP.

Once the project is completed, it is expected that participating Caribbean Ports, will have improved disaster risk management capabilities and resiliency, including an appropriate EOP, which may enable them to better respond to manmade and/or natural hazards.
Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and TobagoIntegral Development CARICOM, SICAProject$607
Implementation tools for the Belém do Pará Convention within the framework of the Spotlight Initiative in Latin America

The project aims to provide tools to the States Parties for strengthening the capacities of legislators, representatives of national machineries for the advancement of women, the judiciary and civil society organizations in Latin America, under the Belem do Para Convention standards, in the following topics: a) incorporation of the gender perspective in the measures in place under the COVID19 pandemic and follow-up; b) harmonization of national legislation and policies with the Comprehensive Model Law to prevent, punish and eradicate gender-related killings of women Femicide/Femicide; c) harmonization of legislation regarding cyber violence and cyberbullying against women and girls with international standards and the Convention; d) harmonization of criminal procedural laws to promote the adoption of standards for the investigation of femicide in line with the Model Law on Femicide and the Latin American Model Protocol for the investigation of femicide; e) harmonization of civil and family legislation with established standards; f) establishment of standards in free legal advisory services for survivors of gender violence and their families; g) comprehensive reparation for victims of violence against women and their families through the legislative standards, guidelines and recommendations established in the Model Law.

Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, VenezuelaHuman Rights ALADI, MEXICO, SICAProject$335
Countering the Illicit Proliferation and Ttafficking of Small Arms, Light Weapons and Ammunition, and their Impact in Latin America and the Caribbean

This project is implemented within the framework of the Program for Comprehensive Action in Small Arms and Light Weapons (PACAM), a comprehensive strategy of the DPS/OAS to support the efforts of the Member States of the OAS in controlling small arms and light weapons (SALW) and ammunition, as well as in managing their institutional stockpiles. PACAM is based on the international normative framework, the standards, and the obligations established in the Inter-American Convention against Illicit Manufacturing and Trafficking of Firearms, Ammunition, Explosives and Other Related Materials (CIFTA). Through PACAM, the DPS/OAS has supported Central American countries and Colombia in the destruction of 60,000 weapons and over 1,700 tons of munitions. In addition, 25 Member States have received training, technical assistance, and equipment to improve their marking and recordkeeping capacities.

The project continues with these efforts and it is been implemented since 2019 with the financial support of the European Union. It seeks to strengthen the capacity of OAS Member States to address and reduce the illicit proliferation and trafficking of SALW and conventional munitions in the region. It incorporates lessons learned from the previous phases, including an innovative component to prevent armed violence in affected communities.  

 

Argentina, Belize, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Jamaica, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, UruguayHuman Rights ALADI, CARICOM, SICAProject$3,334
Strengthening Technical Capacities of Frontline Actors of Specific Institutions on the Assistance and Protection of the LGBTI Community and other Victims of Trafficking in Persons

This Project is implemented following the methodology of the Inter-American Program for the Prevention of Violence and Crime. The project has applied, since its formulation, a participative approach, focusing in building solid partnerships and in the interinstitutional and interdisciplinary collaboration between governmental and non-governmental organizations, and efficient and effective assistance of victims of trafficking in persons.

Guatemala is a country of origin, destination and transit for trafficking in persons especially for sexual and labor exploitation. Internationally, Guatemalans are trafficked primarily to Mexico and the United States. Internally, men, women, and children are trafficked for labor exploitation in agriculture, the garment industry, and domestic service. Children are exploited for forced begging, street vending, and tortilla making shops. Women, transgender individuals, adolescents and children are also trafficked for sexual exploitation within the country, and often forced marriages and the selling of daughters are reported in some communities. In addition, members of the LGBTIQ+ community are also at risk of becoming victims of trafficking in persons, due to the situation of parental neglect, discrimination, stigma, and lack of protection services.

In response to this reality, the project seeks to increase the knowledge of professionals working in addressing TIP, preventing it and assisting and protecting  victims of this crime, to consequently achieve adequate and quality care.


GuatemalaDemocracy SICAProject$125
Counterdrug Capacity Building and Technical Assistance Program - Phase IV

Illicit drug production and narcotrafficking are steadily on the rise in the Americas and, in spite of enormous efforts and resources devoted by OAS member states in supply reduction, drug markets appear to be expanding.  These growing markets include plant-based drugs such as cocaine and heroin; synthetic drugs such as methamphetamine, new psychoactive substances (NPS), fentanyl, and its analogues; as well as precursor chemicals which are diverted from licit distribution channels to produce illicit drugs.

CICAD’s Counterdrug Capacity Building Program, in place since 2000, seeks to strengthen the capacity of member states to disrupt the illicit production, trafficking, and sale of drugs, as well as to prevent the diversion of chemical precursors used in their manufacture. The program focuses on five programmatic areas: i. counterdrug intelligence for the control of narcotrafficking; ii. control of precursor chemicals, synthetic drugs, and NPS; iii. counterdrug maritime cooperation and port narcotrafficking control; iv. aerial drug trafficking control, and v. gender mainstreaming in law enforcement agencies.  

Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, United States of America, UruguayHuman Rights ALADI, CANADA, CARICOM, MEXICO, SICA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICAProject$7,269
Institutional strengthening to fight against corruption in Haiti

In the midst of anti-government and anti-corruption protests and with a deteriorating sociopolitical context, the SSD/DSDSM conducted a field visit in Haiti to discuss and look into anti-corruption solutions along with the Government of Haiti. Further to this visit, on January 31, 2019, the OAS Secretary General received a formal request from the Government of Haiti for technical support to fight against corruption.Following the Government of Haiti’ request  to receive support for the setting-up of anti-corruption infrastructure in Haiti, the OAS proposes to provide institutional reinforcement by improving existing institutional anti-corruption systems and processes to fight against corruption - in tight collaboration with Haitian institutions. The OAS will concomitantly collaborate with the Government of Haiti to establish integrated investigation teams on financial crimes, within the anti-corruption system, that will benefit from a transfer of expertise to allow them to efficiently investigate on their own by the end of the project; review the national legislation to ensure that it provides the sufficient means to fight against corruption; promote civil society organizations engagement in anticorruption matters; and enhance capacities of national authorities to manage humanitarian aid according to anti-corruption protocols by incorporating corruption risk management in emergency preparedness strategies.

HaitiDemocracy CARICOMProject$18,438
Strengthening governance capacities in LAC to comply with the national commitments set out in the Paris Agreement: a perspective from Costa Rica, Uruguay and Jamaica

The objective of this technical cooperation is to support Costa Rica, Uruguay and Jamaica in the identification of best practices and opportunities in governance issues in order to promote compliance with their NDCs and the Sustainable Development Goals set out in the 2030 Agenda, with an approach derived from the macro-regime in a cost efficient manner and with access to financing. This technical cooperation will derive additional benefits to other LAC countries that can both contribute to the experiences and benefit from them.This technical cooperation will be developed in three main components:A component that will allow to develop the bases to establish the correspondence of international commitments with public policy, considering the importance of good governance. A second component that aims to take advantage of the common interests of LAC to address solutions transformed into holistic opportunities. And a third component that takes advantage of the capacities developed by the IDB in the field of sustainable infrastructures as a means to contribute to the implementation of the NDCs.

Costa Rica, Jamaica, UruguayHuman Rights ALADI, CARICOM, SICAProject$1,068
InterAmerican Program of Judicial Facilitators: Technical Assistance to the Judicial Branch of Córdoba (Argentina)

The Province of Córdoba is located in the center of Argentina and is divided into departments, which in turn are located in municipalities and communes, the latter having the characteristic of having a population density of less than 2,000 inhabitants and these are communities that are usually far from the big cities, which in some cases causes the populations to see their access to justice hampered for reasons of infrastructure, transportation costs, coverage capacity of the judiciary, lack of information, absence of alternative dispute resolution mechanisms, among others. The Judicial Branch is headed by the Córdoba Court of Justice (TSJ) who, upon learning about the technical assistance that the OAS has provided through the Judicial Facilitators Program in Central America, Paraguay and the province of Formosa (Argentina), decided to request technical assistance from the Organization for the establishment of a Provincial Service of Judicial Facilitators in Córdoba. The purpose of the project is to provide technical assistance to the Judicial Branch of Córdoba for the establishment of the Provincial Service of Judicial Facilitators in said province. The project proposes: to provide support to the Supreme Court in the implementation of a methodology for the establishment of the Service of Judicial Facilitators; and the development of the capacities of the personnel of the Judicial Power to provide the Service, through the development of a training program. This project has a duration of 18 months and an approximate budget of $ 82,000.

ArgentinaDemocracy ALADIProject$82
Inter-American Network on Counterterrorism

Purpose: Facilitate operational information sharing in real time to prevent and counterterrorism in the region.

The IACT Network is CICTE’s flagship initiative that responds to the needs expressed by OAS Member States to facilitate operational information sharing in real time to prevent and counter terrorism in the region. This platform is similar to the 24/7 Network established by the Council of Europe, which will be fully operational in 2021 and will facilitate contact between established national focal points so as to expedite the exchange of information around potential terrorist threats with the goal –and hope—of preventing incidents or attacks.

Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, United States of America, Uruguay, VenezuelaMultidimensional Security ALADI, CANADA, CARICOM, MEXICO, SICA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICAProject$395
Inter-American Program for Strengthening Democracy and Women´s Leadership

A majority of women in the region continue to be unable to realize the right to be elected or to hold public office, rights established in International and the Inter-American conventions. The CIM seeks to strengthen the realization of women's political rights and promote female access to access and permanence in government positions, while recognizing women’s contributions and differentiated leadership styles, with the creation of the Inter-American Program Strengthening Democracy and Women's Leadership. This project seeks to respond to the following problems: 1) Lack of institutionalized, quality initiatives with a gender focus aimed at strengthening the political leadership of women in the face of a growing demand from women in this area; 2) Persistence of socialization processes based on gender and greater domestic burden and care for women; 3) Lack of knowledge about the factors that contribute to strengthening the political leadership of women; 4) The risk that under COVID-19 the problems of inequality in electoral competition will intensify.

The Program will provide training and tools with a gender perspective to women to promote better performance in electoral campaigns, with Courses for Electoral Candidates; and for those already in government positions, with the launch of a course on Women’s Leadership and Public Policy. Additionally, this project will create a Scholarship Fund to ensure that women belonging to groups traditionally excluded from politics have access to training; and a Research Fund to generate evidence for the region on how training initiatives for women politicians contribute to strengthening their leadership abilities.  


Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, United States of America, Uruguay, VenezuelaDemocracy ALADI, CANADA, CARICOM, MEXICO, SICA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICAProject$2,515
Mission to Support the International Commission against Impunity in El Salvador--CICIES (1st phase)

The International Commission Against Impunity (CICIES) is a high priority initiative for the State and society of El Salvador and the OAS to tackle impunity and corruption in the country. The objective of the Commission is to strengthen the institutions in El Salvador and fight against the systematic impunity and corruption in the governmental institutions and private sector.

On September 6, 2019, the Salvadoran government singed an intention letter with the main propose of establishing an International Commission Against Impunity. This letter contains the compromise of the OAS to implement this commission with the Salvadoran government.

The State of El Salvador has also signed with the OAS the Privilege and Immunity agreement on September 20, 2019. This agreement contains the description of the privileges and immunities that the Salvadoran government gives to the OAS to the efficient implementation and work of this Commission.

The purpose of CICIES is to support, strengthen and actively collaborate with the institutions of the Republic of El Salvador charged with preventing, investigating and punishing acts of corruption and other related crimes, including crimes related to public finances, illicit enrichment, money laundering, and national and transnational organized crime, in non-limiting terms.

After the signing of the aforementioned documents, and after receiving contribution from the Government of El Salvador, the OAS began his work to implement the CICIES. This proposal represents the first phase of CICIES (2 years) which includes the completion of the installation of the Commission in El Salvador and the initiation of its substantial work.

El SalvadorDemocracy SICAProject$15,803
To support the creation of an independent technical secretariat to facilitate the drafting of the new constitution

Following the request made by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to receive support in the context of the constitutional reform process in Haiti, the OAS proposed facilitating all related discussions until the successful completion of the reform by providing technical and financial support to create a technical secretariat. This secretariat will work in close collaboration with publicly- and privately-funded Haitian universities. The initiative will allow for the creation of an independent, non-political, non-partisan and neutral technical secretariat to bring transparency to the process of constitutional reform.

The OAS proposal is to establish a fully-effective technical secretariat in Haiti over a 12-month period with the following responsibilities: a) attending all necessary meetings and working sessions related to the constitutional reform; b) developing critical documents to oversee the advancements of the reform; c) organizing workshops with national and international constitutionalist experts and; d) the creation of an archival unit.

The implementation of this project will primarily focus on the recruitment of the technical secretariat staff members and the identification of experts in constitutional reform and other related matters. The OAS will concomitantly collaborate with local universities to create a specific framework as well as guidelines in order to establish a technical secretariat that will be effectively managed throughout the duration of the project.

HaitiDemocracy CARICOMProject$1,075
Strengthening Cargo Security in the Americas - Phase II

The CICTE Secretariat considers this project to be timely in focus and scope, and a necessary next step to build upon the work and lessons learned in previous border security initiatives, particularly the Cargo and Container Security Program, as capacity-building gaps in previous iterations with countries in the region have been brought to the spotlight, revealing countries’ needs to increase technical capacities in cargo security.  

Beneficiary countries and marine and land borders for this project were selected based on the following criteria:

a) Points of entry that represent important import, export, or transshipment hubs of commercial cargo.

b) Points of entry that have seen rapid growth in container traffic in the last two years and thus may require assistance assuring container and vessel security standards in the face of expanded traffic.

c) Points of entry that have been identified by port security experts and practitioners as having potentially lax cargo security standards or insufficient security resources or lack updated training curricula.

d) Ports that are not current recipients of and have not recently received similar container security capacity building from the OAS or other international organizations.

Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, United States of America, Uruguay, VenezuelaMultidimensional Security ALADI, CANADA, CARICOM, MEXICO, SICA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICAProject$9,470
Strengthening Cyber Security Capabilities in the Americas - Phase II

Although member states have enhanced their cybersecurity capacities, the average maturity level of the region is still low, according to the report:  Cybersecurity: Risks, Progress, and the way forward in Latin America and the Caribbean, published in July 2020 which follows the Oxford Cybersecurity Capacity Maturity Model for Nations (CMM).  

The report indicates that most member states have started to formulate some initiatives, including measures for capacity building in cybersecurity. Many of these measures have already been put into practice; however, they are being implemented on an ad-hoc basis and without coordination among key stakeholders.

To keep enhancing cybersecurity capabilities, the CICTE Secretariat has designed a comprehensive, 5 year Project aimed at improving capabilities to detect cyber threat prevent, respond to and recover from cyber incidents in OAS Member States that request its support.   
Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, United States of America, Uruguay, VenezuelaDemocracy ALADI, CANADA, CARICOM, MEXICO, SICA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICAProject$18,860
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