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Environment
Ministerials Paragraphs Related to the Theme Paragraphs VII Summit

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Reports
Date:  6/7/2016 
Information available in Portuguese
Paragraphs: - Paragraphs VII Summit: 1

Date:  6/7/2016 
Information available in Portuguese
Paragraphs: - Paragraphs VII Summit: 3

Date:  6/7/2016 
Information available in Portuguese
Paragraphs: - Paragraphs VII Summit: 5

Date:  6/7/2016 
Información disponible en portugués
Paragraphs: - Paragraphs VII Summit: 6

Date:  11/30/2010 
Sustainable Development:
Pursuant to UN General Assembly resolution A/RES/64/236 of December 24, 2009, Brazil will host, in 2012, the next United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio + 20) in Rio de Janeiro. This event will provide Heads of State and Government with opportunities to take stock of progress toward the implementation f environmental commitments assumed since the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, as well as to discuss political resolve for new substantive advances.

The topics to be addressed include the “green economy” in relation to sustainable development and poverty reduction, as well as the institutional framework for sustainable development. The agenda of Rio + 20 will be developed within the UN Commission on Sustainable Development (CSD), which will also serve as the Preparatory Committee for the Conference, to take place in parallel to its multi-year Program of Work 2004-2017.
Paragraphs: 57 Paragraphs VII Summit: -

Date:  11/30/2010 
Addressing Climate Change:
Brazil has taken specific measures to address climate change by harnessing its national potential in this regard. Examples of Brazil’s willingness to step up voluntary efforts to mitigate the impacts of climate change include the National olicy on Climate Change, approved in December 2009, and the National Plan on Climate Change, launched in December 2008. The plan’s objectives include curbing illegal deforestation and encouraging alternative economic activities in the country’s orestlands. Between 2006 and 2009, the plan aims to reduce deforestation by 40 percent with respect to the average rate recorded between 1996 and 2005, and to further reduce deforestation by an additional 30 percent over the next two 4-year periods (2010-2013 and 2014-2017). Brazil’s National Policy on Climate Change was adopted on December 29, 2009, setting forth national objectives and guidelines for action to address climate change, and enacting into law Brazil’s voluntary commitment to reduce its carbon emissions by between 36.1 and 38.9 percent by 2020, with respect to its normal growth curve.

Developing Sustainable Energy Systems:
In 2009, Brazil achieved two important milestones. According to reports published by the Energy Research Corporation of Brazil’s Ministry of Mines and Energy (MME) in April 2010, renewable electric sources within the country’s energy matrix grew by 47.3 percent in 2009, accounting for the largest percentage increase recorded since 1992, and much higher than the global average. Similarly, CO2 emissions per unit of energy produced fell in 2009, to a level of 1.43 tons of CO2 per ton of equivalent petroleum (TEP) of energy produced, whereas the global and OECD-country averages are 2.39 tons of CO2 per TEP and 2.37 tons of CO2/TEP, respectively. It is important to underscore that the ratio of energy produced to CO2 produced to CO2 emissions has fallen steadily in Brazil since 2001.
Paragraphs: 58 Paragraphs VII Summit: -

Date:  11/30/2010 
Developing Sustainable Energy Systems:
In 2009, Brazil achieved two important milestones. According to reports published by the Energy Research Corporation of Brazil’s Ministry of Mines and Energy (MME) in April 2010, renewable electric sources within the country’s energy matrix grew by 47.3 percent in 2009, accounting for the largest percentage increase recorded since 1992, and much higher than the global average. Similarly, CO2 emissions per unit of energy produced fell in 2009, to a level of 1.43 tons of CO2 per ton of equivalent petroleum (TEP) of energy produced, whereas the global and OECD-country averages are 2.39 tons of CO2 per TEP and 2.37 tons of CO2/TEP, respectively. It is important to underscore that the ratio of energy produced to CO2 emissions has fallen steadily in Brazil since 2001.
Paragraphs: 59 Paragraphs VII Summit: -

Date:  11/29/2010 
Sustainable Management of Protected Areas:

Brazil understands that through its National System of Conservation Units (SNUC), it can efficiently pursue its strategic objective of using environmental resources to promote opportunities for sustainable buiness ventures, which are in turn capable of accommodating economic growth, creating jobs and income, while at the same time protecting Brazil’s natural resources. Between 2003 and 2009, the surface area of Brazil’s federal Conservation Units was increased by 54 percent with respect to its 2002 level—representing an additional 271,000 km2 of territory added to the total of existing protected areas. In all, Brazil has 768,000 km2 of federal protected areas. Moreover, the individual states have designated an additional 418,000 km2 as protected areas. According to the World Database on Protected Areas, a joint project of the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and the International Union for Conservation of Nature, between 2003 and 2009, Brazil was responsible for designating 73 percent of protected areas worldwide.

In the Amazon alone, some 53 million hectares of federal and state lands were designated as protected areas between 2004 and 2009, especially in zones where the forest was under threat by the encroaching economic frontier. In addition, another 10 million hectares of indigenous reserves were designated during this period. Today, 27.04 percent of the Amazon has been designated as protected areas, of which 9 percent are fully protected, and another 17 percent have been designated as areas of sustainable use. Worthy of note in this regard is the Amazon Region Protected Areas Program (ARPA), constituting the single largest cooperation initiative for the designation and management of conservation areas in the Amazon. ARPA is responsible for administering technical and financial cooperation resources, which have amounted to nearly US$400 million over 10 years.
Paragraphs: 64 Paragraphs VII Summit: -

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