Biblioteca Digital

Búsqueda avanzada

Behind the numbers: ending school violence and bullying

School-related violence is an infringement of children’s and adolescents’ rights to education and well-being. No country can achieve inclusive and equitable quality education for all if learners experience violence and bullying in school

  • 24 marzo 2021
  • Ingresado por: Anna Uchoa
  • Visto: 157
  • 0 Comentarios
Behind the numbers: ending school violence and bullying

This UNESCO publication provides an up-to-date and comprehensive overview of global and regional prevalence and trends related to school-related violence and examines the nature and impact of school violence and bullying. It reviews national responses, focusing on countries that have seen positive trends in prevalence and identifies factors that have contributed to an effective response to school violence and bullying.

REUNIÓN DE AUTORIDADES NACIONALES EN MATERIA DE TRATA DE PERSONAS / MEETING OF NATIONAL AUTHORITIES ON TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS

  • 23 febrero 2021
  • Ingresado por: Jane Piazer
  • Visto: 105
  • 0 Comentarios

La reunión de autoridades nacionales en materia de trata de personas es el foro político para la toma de decisiones en materia de prevención y enfrentamiento de esto delito y la asistencia y protección a las víctimas. La reunión es realizada a cada dos años bajo la presidencia rotativa de un Estado Miembro de la Organización de los Estados Americanos.

.../...

The Meeting of National Authorities on Trafficking in Persons is the main political forum for decision-making on the prevention and prosecution of this crime as well as on the assistance and protection of its victims. The meeting takes place every two years and is presided by the country elected to be the chair.

Exploited and Prosecuted: When Victims of Human Trafficking Commit Crimes

UNODC releases new publication "Female victims of trafficking for sexual exploitation as defendants: A case law analysis"

  • 21 diciembre 2020
  • Ingresado por: Anna Uchoa
  • Visto: 95
  • 0 Comentarios
Exploited and Prosecuted: When Victims of Human Trafficking Commit Crimes

Women and girls, who are often themselves victims of human trafficking and are sexually exploited by criminal gangs, are being prosecuted and convicted for human trafficking-related crimes, according to a new UNODC publication., Female victims of trafficking for sexual exploitation as defendants: A case law analysis

These victims often have no alternative but to obey an order. Some hope to limit their own exploitation or escape poverty by playing a role in the criminal process.

Yet at the same time, the traffickers use the women and girls as a shield to protect themselves from being punished for their crimes.

These are the findings of a new UNODC study which aims to shed light on this alarming trend. The publication highlights the complexities faced by victims of human trafficking, with a view to assist the authorities and victim support services that handle such cases.

Source: Textt by UNODC, 2020

The Wilson Center | Visualizing the Scope and Scale of Femicide in Latin America

The Wilson Center | Visualizing the Scope and Scale of Femicide in Latin America

Even before the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic, the home was a place of fear for many women and girls living in situations of violence. In Latin America, 70 percent of femicides occur in the victim’s home.

The quarantine and stay-at-home orders that governments adopted to address COVID-19 trapped many women with their abusers; evidence from early on in the pandemic reinforces the urgency of this issue. ORMUSA, or Organización de Mujeres Salvadoreña, in El Salvador reported 13 femicides in the first 6 weeks of quarantine between March 17 and April 29, 2020. In Argentina, 63 women and girls were killed because of their gender between March 20 and July 7. In the month of March 2020, 50 feminicides were recorded in just six states in Brazil. These statistics are alarming as the virus continues to spread across the Americas, raising fears that extended lockdowns will continue to exacerbate gender-based violence while governments struggle to address the twin public health crises.

Preventing teen dating violence

CDC fact sheet - 2020

  • 16 octubre 2020
  • Ingresado por: Anna Uchoa
  • Visto: 203
  • 0 Comentarios
Preventing teen dating violence

What is teen dating violence?

Teen dating violence (TDV) is a type of intimate partner violence. It occurs between two people in a close relationship. TDV includes four types of behavior:

 • Physical violence is when a person hurts or tries to hurt a partner by hitting, kicking, or using another type of physical force.

• Sexual violence is forcing or attempting to force a partner to take part in a sex act, sexual touching, or a non-physical sexual event (e.g., sexting) when the partner does not or cannot consent.

• Psychological aggression is the use of verbal and non-verbal communication with the intent to harm another person mentally or emotionally and/or exert control over another person.

• Stalking is a pattern of repeated, unwanted attention and contact by a partner that causes fear or concern for one’s own safety or the safety of someone close to the victim. Teen dating violence, also referred to as “dating violence,” can take place in person or electronically, such as repeated texting or posting sexual pictures of a partner online without consent. Unhealthy relationships can start early and last a lifetime. Teens often think some behaviors, like teasing and name-calling, are a “normal” part of a relationship—but these behaviors can become abusive and develop into serious forms of violence. However, many teens do not report unhealthy behaviors because they are afraid to tell family and friends.

RSS
12345