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Global Estimates of Modern Slavery

The International Labour Organization (ILO), together with Walk Free, and the International Organization for Migration (IOM), published 2021 global and regional estimates on forced labour and forced marriage

  • 12 September 2022
  • Posted by: Mariano Vales
  • Number of views: 0
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Global Estimates of Modern Slavery

According to the OIM, "the 2021 Global Estimates indicate there are 50 million people in situations of modern slavery on any given day, either forced to work against their will or in a marriage that they were forced into. This number translates to nearly one of every 150 people in the world. The estimates also indicate that situations of modern slavery are by no means transient – entrapment in forced labour can last years, while in most cases forced marriage is a life sentence. And sadly, the situation is not improving. The 2021 Global Estimates show that millions more men, women, and children have been forced to work or marry in the period since the previous estimates were released in 2017.

The global and regional estimates presented in this report were developed by the International Labour Organization (ILO), Walk Free, and the International Organization for Migration (IOM). The estimates are based on a jointly developed methodology: as was the case for the 2016 global estimates, the 2021 calculations are derived from multiple data sources, as no single source was sufficiently reliable. The principal sources are data from nationally representative household surveys – 68 forced labour surveys and 75 forced marriage surveys – jointly conducted by ILO and Walk Free, as well as the Counter Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC) anonymized case dataset on victims of trafficking collected by IOM and its partners in the process of providing protection and assistance services to trafficked persons."

The Gleaner: Puppet Pals – Crawford-Brown Pushing Play Therapy for Traumatized Children

The Gleaner: Puppet Pals – Crawford-Brown Pushing Play Therapy for Traumatized Children

Dr. Claudette Crawford-Brown, a senior lecturer at the University of the West Indies in the Department of Sociology, Psychology and Social Work, has decades of experience working with trauma­tized­­ children. Along with her colleagues, she has used play therapy to help children with issues ranging from bullying, migration, and human trafficking.

The Prevention Project

Richmond Justice Initiative

  • 30 April 2018
  • Posted by: Nicolas Devia
  • Number of views: 794
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The Prevention Project
The “Prevention Project” is a program put into place by the Richmond Justice Initiative whose objective is to equip, mobilize and educate communities on how to fight human trafficking. RJI believes that the education of high school and college students is the best way to prevent that at-risk population from falling into the hands of traffickers and/or criminals. Through a six (6) lesson academic curriculum students receive information from a comprehensive approach. Attendants are taught about the international dimensions of the crime, their impact at home, the economics of trafficking and the impact it has on culture and in their communities. Also, potential victims receive useful information to identify cases in which they or someone close may be endangered. Currently, the program has been implemented in 7 States of the US, reaching over 11,000 students.

Reuters: Shame silences Ecuador's indigenous people trafficked for sex

Written by Anastasia Moloney

Reuters: Shame silences Ecuador's indigenous people trafficked for sex

Hundreds of indigenous people, including children, across Ecuador are being trafficked each year but few victims come forward because of shame and fear and little is known about the true scale of the problem, campaigners say.

Insight Crime: Nearly 50 Groups Active in Human Trafficking in Mexico

Written by Parker Asmann

Insight Crime: Nearly 50 Groups Active in Human Trafficking in Mexico

A recent report offers new insight into human trafficking in Mexico, and reinforces concerns about the role of organized groups in this criminal industry.

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