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Ariela Suster: Breaking the Sequence of Violence

Sequence Collection

  • 27 April 2018
  • Posted by: Nicolas Devia
  • Number of views: 713
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Ariela Suster: Breaking the Sequence of Violence

In the desperate situation of violence that El Salvador is living at this moment, alternative solutions are welcomed by the communities. Sequence is a brand founded by Ariela Suster, a Salvadorian who has lived violence first hand when her family experienced a case of kidnapping while the civil war in the country was raging. This clothing brand employs at risk youth to offer them an alternative to the lifestyle of the gang, a common destiny for young men who are unemployed or without access to education. Due to the invisible borders gangs construct to dominate sector of the cities, Suster uses technology to overcome these impositions. Through videocalls in Skype, Sequence educates their employees on the techniques needed to craft bracelets and other products of the brand.

Violent crime in São Paulo has dropped dramatically. Is this why?

World Economic Forum

  • 17 April 2018
  • Posted by: Nicolas Devia
  • Number of views: 536
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Violent crime in São Paulo has dropped dramatically. Is this why?
In this brief article, Robert Muggah and Ilona Szabó de Carvalho hint at some of the politics that led to the decrease of homicide in São Paulo from 52.5 per 100.000 in 1999 to 6.1 per 100.000 today. The renovation of the São Paulo state’s police that included the intensive use of data and technological tools opened the door for incorporation of hot spot and community policing strategies in the agency. Also, community-oriented policies planned from a public health perspective targeted the habits/conditions that were seen to trigger violence, such as the consumption and expend of alcohol at late night and the easy access to firearms. While police brutality is still a problem in the state, the reforms also included a process of culture change on what it means to be a police officer.

Social Crime Prevention in Trinidad

Pan American Development Foundation

  • 11 April 2018
  • Posted by: Nicolas Devia
  • Number of views: 621
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Social Crime Prevention in Trinidad
Trinidad and Tobago has seen its public security deteriorate as the epidemic of violence in Latin America spreads from country to country. This violence is the result of the easy access to firearms and the segregation/exclusion of young men from the society, which translates in the formation of highly territorial gangs. With these conditions, Trinidad and Tobago counted more than 100 gangs and a tenth place on global murder rates in 2016. To tackle this issue the government partnered with the US State Department and the Pan American Development Foundation to create the “Resistance and Prevention Program” (RAPP), which is also present in the Bahamas and Suriname. The RAPP program builds trust between communities and law enforcement agencies through dialogues, community policing and outreach programs. It has brought a whole government approach, where different institution share information and don’t duplicate information. Through efficiency and comprehensiveness the program provides the tools to schools, families, social workers and law enforcement officers for the common reconstruction of the social fabric and harmony in the communities.

End Violence: Mexico Launches its End Violence Nation Action Plan​

Remarks by Susan Bissell

End Violence: Mexico Launches its End Violence Nation Action Plan​

Remarks of Susan Bissell, Director of the Global Partnership to End Violence Against Children at the Launch of the End Violence Nation Action Plan. 

End Violence: Launch Film

End Violence: Launch Film

End Violence is bringing together stakeholders from across the world to end all forms of violence against children, turning the belief that no violence against children is justifiable and all violence is preventable into a compelling agenda for action.

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