Digital Library

A gradient of childhood self-control predicts health, wealth, and public safety

  • 15 November 2016
  • Posted by: Jane Piazer
  • Number of views: 4635
  • 0 Comments
A gradient of childhood self-control predicts health, wealth, and public safety

Policy-makers are considering large-scale programs aimed at selfcontrol to improve citizens’ health and wealth and reduce crime. Experimental and economic studies suggest such programs could reap benefits. Yet, is self-control important for the health, wealth, and public safety of the population? Following a cohort of 1,000 children from birth to the age of 32 y, we show that childhood selfcontrol predicts physical health, substance dependence, personal finances, and criminal offending outcomes, following a gradient of self-control. Effects of children’s self-control could be disentangled from their intelligence and social class as well as from mistakes they made as adolescents. In another cohort of 500 sibling-pairs, the sibling with lower self-control had poorer outcomes, despite shared family background. Interventions addressing self-control might reduce a panoply of societal costs, save taxpayers money, and promote prosperity.

Category:Publications
Country:United States of America
Language:English
Year:2010
Institution:PNAS
Author:Moffitt, T., Arseneault., L., Belsky, D., Dickson, N., Hancox, R., Harrington, H., Houts, R., Poulton, R., Roberts, B., Ross, S., Sears, M., Thomson, M., y Caspi, A.
Additional Information:Improved health and wealth for crime reduction

Documents to download

Jane PiazerJane Piazer

Other posts by Jane Piazer

Contact publisher

Please login or register to post comments.

x