Repository

The topics for discussion on this portal have already been analyzed by multiple actors. In this repository, the GS / OAS brings together some of them, as one more contribution to the discussion. This repository has two sections: In the Policy section, we will integrate information on policies relevant to the issues under discussion that are being implemented by Member States, Observer States and other States of the world. In Studies we will include analyzes, reports and reports published by academic institutions, think tanks, international and multilateral organizations, non-governmental organizations and private entities, all of them of recognized prestige, which are relevant to the conversation. The OAS will publish these articles and reports in their original language.

“When Will We Have a Vaccine?” — Understanding Questions and Answers about Covid-19 Vaccination/NEJM

  • 29 September 2020

As Covid-19 vaccines move into phase 3 clinical trials, enthusiasm about the innovative and sophisticated technologies being used needs to be replaced by consideration of the actions and messages that will foster trust among clinicians and the public. Although vast investments have been made in developing safe and effective vaccines, it is important to remember that it is the act of vaccination itself that prevents harm and saves lives. Considered fully, the question “When will we have a Covid-19 vaccine?” makes clear the many ways in which efforts related to both the “when” and the “we” can affect vaccination uptake. Recognizing the significance of both aspects of the question can help public health officials and scientists both to hone current messaging related to Covid-19 vaccines and to build a better foundation for clinicians who will be educating patients and parents about vaccination.

Supporting Migrants and Remittances as COVID-19 Rages On/ IMF

  • 29 September 2020

Just as COVID-19 has disproportionately impacted some communities more than others, globally, the virus has had an oversized negative impact on migrant workers.

Perhaps surprisingly, despite the bleak experience for foreign overseas workers during the pandemic, the effect on remittances—the flow of money they send back home—has, in many cases, proven resilient. But that trend may yet be upended.

The impact of COVID-19 on education - Insights from Education at a Glance 2020/ OECD

  • 29 September 2020

The lockdowns in response to COVID-19 have interrupted conventional schooling with nationwide school closures in most OECD and partner countries, the majority lasting at least 10 weeks. While the educational community have made concerted efforts to maintain learning continuity during this period, children and students have had to rely more on their own resources to continue learning remotely through the Internet, television or radio. Teachers also had to adapt to new pedagogical concepts and modes of delivery of teaching, for which they may not have been trained. In particular, learners in the most marginalised groups, who don’t have access to digital learning resources or lack the resilience and engagement to learn on their own, are at risk of falling behind.

G20 Labour and Employment Ministers/ G20

  • 29 September 2020

We, the Labour and Employment Ministers of the G20 members and invited countries, met virtually on the 10th September 2020, to discuss recent global economic and labor market developments and to advance our work towards ‘Empowering People’ and ‘Realizing Opportunities of the 21st Century for All.’ This year, COVID-19 has brought an unprecedented global challenge with significant human costs. Fighting and overcoming the pandemic remains our highest and overriding priority. We recognize the importance of protecting and promoting decent jobs for all, especially for women and youth, within our domestic and global labor markets. We support comprehensive, robust and adaptive social protection systems and we are committed to tackling inequalities, including gender inequalities. We acknowledge the value of bringing together technology and a human-centered approach including by using Behavioral Insights in employment policymaking..

What now? Decisive actions to emerge stronger in the next normal/McKINSEY&COMPANY

  • 29 September 2020

One priority, then, is to reenergize the organization—to act rather than react. Even as the COVID-19 crisis continues to create a world of uncertainty, the goal must be to rebuild for the longer term. Companies that are strong and resilient will be better placed to survive and prosper. Those are qualities that can’t be taken for granted; they need to be cultivated.

Country policy responses/ ILO

  • 29 September 2020

Countries are taking unprecedented measures to combat the spread of the disease, while ameliorating its pernicious effect on the economy and labour market.

Find out the policies implemented by governments, employers’ and workers’ organizations, and the ILO in 188 countries and territories.

Two metres or one: what is the evidence for physical distancing in COVID-19?/BMJ

  • 29 September 2020

Physical distancing is an important part of measures to control covid-19, but exactly how far away and for how long contact is safe in different contexts is unclear. Rules that stipulate a single specific physical distance (1 or 2 metres) between individuals to reduce transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing covid-19, are based on an outdated, dichotomous notion of respiratory droplet size. This overlooks the physics of respiratory emissions, where droplets of all sizes are trapped and moved by the exhaled moist and hot turbulent gas cloud that keeps them concentrated as it carries them over metres in a few seconds.12 After the cloud slows sufficiently, ventilation, specific patterns of airflow, and type of activity become important. Viral load of the emitter, duration of exposure, and susceptibility of an individual to infection are also important.

Apuntes técnicos sobre la sostenibilidad de la deuda pública en Centroamérica/ CEPAL

  • 29 September 2020

En este documento se presenta una propuesta de estimación y análisis comparado de la sostenibilidad de la deuda pública para los países de Centroamérica para el período 2018-2023. Se pone especial énfasis en las trayectorias de deuda y en los factores internos y externos que pueden modificar dichas sendas, incluyendo el efecto de la pandemia por COVID-19. El objetivo es estimar las posibles trayectorias de la deuda pública en el largo plazo, y evidenciar los riesgos existentes, de acuerdo con supuestos económicos probables, dadas las condiciones de cada país.

BCIE - CABEI, TaiwanICDF and DFC sign Letter of Interest to support growth in the Central American region during and after the COVID-19 Emergency

  • 14 September 2020

Within the framework of a strategic dialogue, the Central American Bank for Economic Integration (CABEI), the International Cooperation and Development Fund (TaiwanICDF), and the US International Development Finance Corporation (DFC) announced today the signing of a Letter of Interest to help the countries of the Central American region strengthen their response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras particularly have long struggled with barriers to economic development and prosperity, which has exacerbated challenges such as poverty, violence, and illegal migration in the region, now adding to the significant loss of jobs in different productive sectors of the economies.

UNDP: The Fast and the Curious

  • 2 September 2020

Whether it’s climate change, plummeting biodiversity rates, or unchecked consumption and waste, we already face unprecedented planetary challenges.
Now, the coronavirus COVID-19 has added an extra, deadly layer of complexity to the paths we must forge.
And we have a very limited time left in which to make the big changes that will create a sustainable and just future.
Now more than ever, there are no one-size-fits-all answers; new ways of thinking are needed.

OECD: Environmental responses to the COVID-19

  • 2 September 2020

The focus of this brief is on the immediate steps that governments can take to ensure that emergency measures implemented to tackle the Coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis do not derail their efforts to address pressing environmental challenges and improve the environmental health and resilience of societies

OCDE: El COVID-19 y la conducta empresarial responsable

  • 2 September 2020

Esta nota, preparada por el Centro de la OCDE para la Conducta Empresarial Responsable, revisa los desafíos de la crisis del COVID-19 frente al comportamiento empresarial y la respuesta de los gobiernos y las empresas; describe los fundamentos y el método para adoptar un enfoque de conducta empresarial responsable frenta al COVID-19; y explica los posibles beneficios a corto y largo plazo de tal enfoque.

OECD: COVID-19 and Responsible Business Conduct

  • 2 September 2020

This note, prepared by the OECD Centre for Responsible Business Conduct, reviews the challenges the COVID-19 crisis presents for business behaviour and outlines initial responses by governments and companies. It describes the rationale and method for adopting a responsible business conduct approach to address the crisis and sets down the potential short-term and long-term benefits of such an approach.

Government Support and the COVID-19 Pandemic

  • 2 September 2020

The economic consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic call for urgent policy responses to support households and firms alike, but how this support is designed will be critical in ensuring that it does not result in enduring global market distortions. Support packages that are time-limited, targeted, cash-based, and consistent with longer-term objectives are the basis for ensuring a sustainable recovery. Transparency of support packages is critical for public trust, but also once the crisis is over in order to foster accountability and enable governments to learn from what worked best

Learning Remotely When Schools Close: Insights from PISA

  • 1 September 2020

As school after school shuts down in the face of the Covid-19 crisis (in now more than 140 countries), online learning opportunities have been elevated from a bonus extracurricular facility to a critical lifeline for education.

The opportunities digital technologies offer go well beyond a stop-gap solution during the crisis. Digital technology allows us to find entirely new answers to what people learn, how people learn, where people learn and when they learn. Technology can enable teachers and students to access specialised materials well beyond textbooks, in multiple formats and in ways that can bridge time and space. Alongside great teachers, intelligent online learning systems do not only teach us science; they can simultaneously observe how we study, how we learn science, the kind of tasks and thinking that interest us, and the kind of problems we find boring or difficult.

The systems can then adapt the learning experience to suit our personal learning style with far greater granularity and precision than any traditional classroom setting possibly can. Similarly, virtual laboratories give us the opportunity to design, conduct and learn from experiments, rather than just learning about them.

That being said, the Covid-19 crisis strikes at a point when most of the education systems covered by the OECD’s latest round of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) are not ready for the world of digital learning opportunities. Below are some sobering numbers. The data were collected as part of the global PISA assessment in 2018, and are based on representative samples from 79 education systems involving over 600,000 15-year-olds. Unless otherwise noted, numbers refer to the average across the 36 OECD countries. Data not provided in this note are accessible through the PISA database

Global Macroeconomic Scenarios of the COVID-19 Pandemic

  • 23 July 2020

We then explore scenarios where the opening of economies results in recurrent outbreaks of various magnitudes and countries respond with and without economic shutdowns. We also explore the impact if no vaccine becomes available and the world must adapt to living with COVID-19 in coming decades. The final scenario is the case where a given country is in the most optimistic scenario (Scenario 1), but the rest of the world is in the most pessimistic scenario. The scenarios demonstrate that even a contained outbreak will significantly impact the global economy in the coming years. The economic consequences of the pandemic under plausible scenarios are substantial and the ongoing economic adjustment is far from over.

New Study Reveals Oxford Coronavirus Vaccine Produces Strong Immune Response

  • 20 July 2020

A team of scientists at Oxford University’s Jenner Institute and Oxford Vaccine Group has taken the next step towards the discovery of a safe, effective and accessible vaccine against coronavirus. The results of the Phase I/II trial published today in the scientific journal, The Lancet, indicate no early safety concerns and induces strong immune responses in both parts of the immune system.

COVID-19 in Emerging Markets: Firm-Survey Evidence

  • 16 July 2020

Using survey responses across nearly 500 listed firms in 10 emerging markets from early April, we find the vast majority of firms were negatively affected by COVID-19. Firms reacted by reducing investment rather than payroll. There is a surprising degree of support vis-à-vis employees, customers, other stakeholders and broader society. Although stock prices initially reacted to the impact of the crisis, delayed stock price reactions suggest evidence of inefficient markets. Furthermore, we find evidence that stakeholder-centric firms experienced lower stock price declines during the crisis drawdown.

New Report on COVID-19 and Democracy Calls for Urgent Measures by Governments and Civil Society

  • 15 July 2020

The report, endorsed by 11 pro-democracy institutions, is aligned with a recent ‘Call to Defend Democracy’ that was signed by almost 100 organizations from all over the world, as well as nearly 500 prominent individuals from 119 countries, including 13 Nobel Laureates and 62 former Heads of State or Government.

Special Commentary: COVID-19 US Army War College

  • 16 June 2020

SSI research professors and faculty consider the COVID-19 pandemic and its long-term, strategic implications for the U.S. Army and national security.  Each essay provides an independent, specialized view on a particular aspect of the challenges posed by COVID-19 and includes recommendations on how the Army and DoD should address those issues.

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