Lessons Plans

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Characteristics of the 4 Gospels in the Catholic Bible

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Luis Coronado Vielman
  • Number of views: 112
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Characteristics of the 4 Gospels in the Catholic Bible
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Religious education
Topic: The evangelists
 
Description: By completing the cycle of six five-minute interventions, which will have been done circulate all the sheets, orderly and once for each of the participants, eighteen ideas will be available on each sheet, which can mean one hundred and eight ideas in only half an hour.

The Historical Process

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Rochelle Campbell-Fletcher
  • Number of views: 76
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The Historical Process
Students’ age range: 16-18
Main subject: Not specified
Topic: Migratory movements and patterns of settlements in the Caribbean
 
Description: 1. Zoom in method- Teacher will use the zoom in method of a picture of the Jamaica coat of arms which has the inscription ‘Out of many, one people”. Students will be encouraged to share what the inscription means having figured out what the picturerepresents.
2. Trio Discussion – How did all the different groups that now lives in the Caribbean get here? Representatives from each group will share their ideas with the entire class.
3. Students directed my teacher will be directed to the smart board to trace the journey of the Spanish, English, French, African ancestors to the Caribbean
4. Students will read from handouts and discuss where they settled and their contributions to the Caribbean eg. Language, dress, food etc

Rites of Passage in the four major religions

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Cleopatro Facey
  • Number of views: 94
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Rites of Passage in the four major religions
Students’ age range: 12-14
Main subject: Religious education
Topic: Rites of Passage associated with birth in the four major religion
 
Description: (Engage) Introduction:
Students will be asked if they know the song “when mothers of Salem”. Students who are familiar with the song will be asked to sing it aloud. After song is complete students will be asked to state the event the song is associated with. Students will also be asked to explain what takes place at this event and the importance of it. Students will be informed that a similar ceremony is done in the other three major religions.
(Explain) Step 1: Definition of key terms.
Students were given the key words in objective one to define from the previous session. Selected students will stand and share their definition with the rest of the class. Discussion will be held after each definition is given.

(Explore) Step 2: Birth Ceremonies in the four-major religion.
The class will be divided into eight groups. Each group will be given a birth rite of passage to look at. Groups will be given a section from their text " Religious Education for Jamaica" pages 82 – 85 to read and discuss in their groups. Students will be permitted to use internet to do further research on the rites of passage they were given. The teacher will walk around the class and assist students where needed.
(Extend) 3: Group presentation
After group discussion and research, each group will present what they have learnt to the rest of the class. Students will be asked to give a brief demonstration of the rites of passage their group looked at. A guided discussion will take place after each presentation.
Students will be asked to used the information they have gathered to create their own notes for the topic.

Critical Thinking

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: karen cash
  • Number of views: 105
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Critical Thinking
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Reading Comprehension and Writing Skills
 
Description: Introduce the topic of finding the main idea in a story by showing Reading Strategies. After watching, discuss what students learned about main ideas and supporting details. Ask them: What was the main idea of the pyramid segment? What are supporting details? How are they used in a story? Talk about books the students have read or movies they have seen in the classroom. What were the main ideas of these stories? What information did supporting details provide?
Read a news story to the class. First, ask students to listen for the main idea and supporting details. Discuss the story with the students. What was the main idea? What were some supporting details?
Divide students into small groups and give each one several newspapers. Tell students that they will choose at least four stories that everyone in the group will read. If newspapers are unavailable have students choose stories from the online news sources or from your newspaper's Web site. Explain to students that they should identify the main idea and at least two supporting details in each of the stories. Have students number and cut out the stories, and give each group member a different story to read; tell students to write the number and the story headline on their writing paper. Explain that students should write the main idea and at least two supporting details directly under the number and headline. Once students finish with their own story, have them switch with a member of their group and repeat the process. They will to repeat the process until all members of the group have read all four stories.
Hold a group discussion about the stories. Ask students to share some main ideas and supporting details. What kinds of information did they learn? If students identified different main ideas for the same story, have them explain their choice and ask the group to reread that particular story. Make sure all students have a firm understanding of a story's main idea.
Ask volunteers to share some information their group learned from reading the news stories. Talk about the stories and the main ideas. For stories that may have been particularly difficult to read or understand, read them aloud have the class try to identify the main ideas.

Time to write

  • 25 April 2018
  • Posted by: Flora M. Zibas Page
  • Number of views: 70
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Time to write
Students’ age range: 16-18
Main subject: Foreign languages
Topic: Writing creativity
 
Description: • Research or write out, on your own, an interesting beginning to a text. One of the sentences must be incomplete. For example:
“In a town far away from any medical service, there once lived a small community. Most of its people were descendants from an old tribe and lived very happily with one another. Most people, in this community, had fallen ill with cholera due to their contaminated water system. All the doctors and voyagers feared to come near this place. One day, … “
• The text must be written on wallpapers. Depending on the number of groups. Each group should have a wallpaper.
• Divide the class into groups of 4.
• Handout a wallpaper (with the chosen beginning) to each group.
• Handout a marker to each group. Each group must have a different color.
• Tell students that they will write as fast as possible on a topic for 2 minutes without worrying about correct language or punctuation. Writing as quickly as possible, if they cannot think of a word they leave a space or write it in their own language. The important thing is to keep writing. Later this text is revised. Working together in groups, students can share ideas.
• When the 2 minutes are up they switch papers and they continue writing on the other group´s paper. The other 2 minutes are up and they switch papers again. It continues this way until all the groups have written on each paper.
• Once you have gathered all the markers and all the students are back in their place, all the papers are read and discussed with the whole class.
RSS
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