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Use of Energy at School

  • 21 October 2017
  • Posted by: Ried Iten
  • Number of views: 1818
  • 5 Comments
Use of Energy at School
Students’ age range: 16-18
Main subject: Sciences
Topic: Saving Energy in Schools and Households
 
Description: Ask students about their knowledge of the availability of energy resources in the region and how long they may last. (Provide the relevant information at this point; reiterate importance at wrap up).
Ask students also about their feelings on energy use in their school, homes, and communities. (Connect relevance of availability of resources with energy use at this point; reiterate importance at wrap up).Students will briefly discuss their knowledge of the availability of energy resources in the region and how long they may last.
Students will also briefly discuss their feelings on energy use in their school, homes, and communities.
Assign reading in the Learn and Save Booklet, pages 34-35 (conserving energy); pages 36 and 37 (ways to conserve energy at school and home)
Explain Socratic Seminar.
Discuss rules of conduct during Socratic Seminar.
Initial/possible discussion questions:
• What do you think about the ways you have read to conserve energy in the school and home?
• Are they sufficient enough to make a significant difference?
• Can energy conservation in the school and home be made more efficient/effective?
The teacher will redirect the discussion where and when necessary.
Students will read the assigned pages in the Learn and Save Booklet.
• Conduct an energy audit at your school (Learn & Save, p. 43) for one week before this lesson. Use the last day of the audit to include and explain this process to the students.
Assign activities:
• Draft a paragraph of your opinion on the most efficient way to conserve energy in the school and explain why.
• In groups of 5, design an energy management action plan (EMAP). Students will complete the assigned activities:
• Draft a paragraph of your opinion on the most efficient way to conserve energy in the school and explain why.
• In groups of 5, design an energy management action plan (EMAP).
Participate in the formation of rules and behavioral conduct for the Socratic Seminar.
Students will participate in the Socratic Seminar.
Assign activities to be completed at home:
• Conduct an energy audit at your home for one week.
• Design an EMAP for your home.
Students will complete the assigned activities:
• Conduct an energy audit at your home for one week.
• Design an EMAP for your home.

Water Conservation

  • 21 October 2017
  • Posted by: Ried Iten
  • Number of views: 887
  • 2 Comments
Water Conservation
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Sciences
Topic: Saving Energy
 
Description: The teacher will facilitate class discussion surrounding the students’ access to clean wáter. The teacher will guide the discussion and initiate pertinent questions where the necessary student will be asked to volunteer to measure the closest clean water access from the classroom (This measurement should be calculated in both distance and time) Upon return; the students will calculate volunteer’s speed (*). The warm-up activity will be used as an introduction to the Water Crisis, which will be followed by the presentation of a video; the following 3-minute video that will be played in class: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCHhwxvQqxg&feature=related. One student will read the story of someone in a developing world who has to walk a long distance to get drinking water. The teacher will reinforce that : To calculate speed: Speed = distance traveled Time (Velocity is speed in a specified direction) Velocity = distance traveled Time The speed of a body is defined as its rate of change of distance with time. Students will recall that the speed is the quotient of distance and time. When a body is traveling for any reasonable distance, then its speed would vary from time to time. So when we speak about the average speed of a body for a particular time interval we get: The average speed = distance travelled The time taken When an object moves with uniform velocity (constant velocity), it will cover equal distances in equal time intervals; that is distance is changing uniformly with time. Thus a graph of distance against time will be a straight line Teacher will ask open-ended questions to cement the relation between math and science as well as to hear the students explain their understanding of the topic Teacher will correct misconceptions where necessary Students will be given a worksheet to practice calculating the speed and creating linear growing patterns/ Drawing Distance-time Graph- The teacher will familiarize students with the rubric for the group activity The teacher will answer questions that may arise from the activity as well as clarify misconceptions if any The teacher will ensure that each group understands what is expected of them •Student groups will each be given a different case study (using real facts, as much as possible), which will provide information on a distance or a time taken to get clean water. •Groups will also be given a blank sheet of graph paper. •For example, one case study might note that the person walks 10km each day. Unless speed is provided, this can be estimated by the students. •In groups, students will draw a graph, comparing distance and time and to develop a graph and an equation. Using the graph or equation, students will estimate the time it takes the person to get water (if distance was provided or vice versa.) •Students will attempt the questions that accompany the graph (to check for understanding) This will be used the following day. (Sample question: based on your graph, if graph was well was constructed 0.5km, from the student’s home, how much time each day would they save?) Students should highlight the importance of water conservation The teacher will familiarize students with the rubric for the group activity The teacher will answer questions that may arise from the activity as well as clarify misconceptions if any The teacher will ensure that each group understands what is expected of them •Student groups will each be given a different case study (using real facts, as much as possible), wh...

Electricity: Uses and Waste

  • 21 October 2017
  • Posted by: Ried Iten
  • Number of views: 2023
  • 0 Comments
Electricity: Uses and Waste
Students’ age range: 12-14
Main subject: Sciences
Topic: Waste of energy
 
Description: Start the lesson by discussing the fact that electricity is something that comes to our houses and schools and must be paid for based on how much we use. Allow students to share their existing knowledge about electricity, especially things in their homes that are powered by electricity. Give students 2-3 minutes to list different things that use electricity around their homes and their school. Spend time explaining that some things they use everyday use energy but not necessarily electricity (Batteries, natural gas, etc). Present your questions about the project:
Activities, expectations, objectives, assessment, etc.After listening to teacher and other students input, students will brainstorm about energy used in their home and come up with a list of items
Provide each student with a copy of the attached handout.
Instruct students over the course of 1-2 days, to record when they use an electric appliance, including light switches.
Once students have completed the recording process spend a day in class discussing closure questions.
Ask students if they know how the calculation is done to determine power consumption.
Ask students why electric energy is considered form of energy.
Participate in a conversation in the group about the questions posed by the teacher to present your previous knowledge on Current used in the home.
Ask as many questions as needed for you to comprehend about calculation on energy consumption.
Asks students:
1. How many times each day did you use electricity?
2. Which appliance did you turn on most frequently?
3. Which appliance ran for the longest amount of time? (Highest amount of hours)
4. What are some ways we can help save and conserve energy in our homes?
5. How many of these appliances didn’t exist when your grandparents were children?
6. Do you think they used more or less electricity than you do and why is that important? After Brainstorming, students will correctly attempt to answer all questions

Electrolysis

  • 21 October 2017
  • Posted by: Ried Iten
  • Number of views: 2163
  • 0 Comments
Electrolysis
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Sciences
Topic: Electrolytes electrical conductors
 
Description: 2. Exploration
• Pass out the instructions for the building of a model for the electrolysis of water, and discuss the content.
• Directs students to work in cooperative groups with adequate working space.
• Ensures that all groups have adequate materials and that all group roles have been assigned.
• Direct group to begin and monitor groups providing advice and help as needed.
Collects directions for exploration.
Checks to make sure the group have all the necessary materials.
Build models and make observations for class discussion.
Raise hands and ask questions
Exceptional learners can work by themselves as the experiment is very simple and does not take long to complete.
Proximity control for hyperactive students.
Print larger font instructions for the visually impaired.
Provide and accept diverse contexts for assessment activities.
ESOL Learners will be encouraged to use pocket translators
3. Explanation
• Give power point presentation with definitions
• Question each group about how the models work and to identify the various parts compared with the content chart.
Watch, listen, and then write the definitions in the note books.
Raise hands and ask questions.
ESOL Learners will be encouraged to use pocket translators
Students unable to read and write will be given the definitions already printed.
Proximity control for hyper active students.
The powerpoint font was made bolder for the person with low visibility.
Provide and accept diverse contexts for assessment activities.
4. Expansion
• Students will be assessed informally on the explanation of the comparison.
• i.e., Did they identify all of the parts from their model in comparison to the content chart. What could have been done to achieve better results
Discuss what they did, how they did it and why they did it with each other and with teacher.
Proximity control for hyperactive students.
Provide and accept diverse contexts for assessment activities.
ESOL Learners will be encouraged to use pocket translators

Energy Waste Awareness

  • 21 October 2017
  • Posted by: Ried Iten
  • Number of views: 1509
  • 0 Comments
Energy Waste Awareness
Students’ age range: 12-14
Main subject: Sciences
Topic: Saving Energy at School
 
Description: Skit: Paying the light bill- Several students will be given electric bills, one student will have the lowest while others are high. Each student will have the same amount of money allocated to pay the bill. The cashier will call off the amount so the others can hear. The class will observe their responses. In the end, the teacher will ask why their bill was the amount…in other words what actions did they take to have such high bills, and for the lowest bill, what actions did they take to have a low bill. (allow remaining students to give input)
RESEARCH & DEFINE
Teacher’s Activities
1) Teacher will give two terms: Energy efficient and Energy conservation, and allow students RESEARCH & DEFINE
Student’s Activities
1) Working in pairs- using internet, students will find the definition of the two terms, state how they differ in meaning and give an example to support this
Teacher’s Activities
1) Teacher will show students images around the home and ask
a) How is energy being used
b) How can energy be conserved or be used more efficiently
As students share their views on energy efficiency, other students are allowed to comment if they agree or disagree with sound reason as to why. Student’s Activities
1) Students will observe images and identify the way in which energy is being used.
2) Additionally students must reason ways in which energy can be conserved or used more efficiently
Teacher’s Activities:
1) Teacher will show image of homes, businesses, factories and Street lights and ask students to Rank them based on who uses the most energy; they must give a reason for their answer.
Reveal answer at the end and reason Student’s Activities
1) Students will observe the images of homes, businesses, factories and Street lights and in groups of 4 agree on ranking scale based on who they think uses the most energy, they must give a reason for their answer.
Teacher’s Activities
1) Teacher will allow students to remain in the same groups of 4 and design a pamphlet, poster, card that informs the public about energy conservation and practices. Student’s Activities
1) In groups of 4 students will design a pamphlet, poster, card that informs the public about energy conservation and practices. Additionally, they must indicate why conserving energy is important.


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