Lessons Plans

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Leadership

  • 24 April 2018
  • Posted by: tamar myles
  • Number of views: 2973
  • 2 Comments
Leadership
Students’ age range: 16-18
Main subject: Not specified
Topic: Leadership
 
Description: Lesson 1
1. The teacher will write the jumbled letters for leadership on the board. The students will then be encouraged to unscramble the letters to spell leadership. The students will then be engaged in a discussion on the concept.

2. The teacher will then question students in order for them to state some qualities of a leader.

3. The students will then be introduced to four types of leader ship styles.

4. The students will then be engaged in a discussion on two of the leadership styles using the fishbowl strategy.

5. The students and teacher will then review the information presented on the handout.

Culminating Activity:

1. The students will be asked questions orally on the topic.

Lesson 2:
1. Students will be engaged in a brief revision of the previous class.
2. Students will be engaged in a discussion on the other two types of leadership styles.
3. The students will then be engaged in a discussion (fishbowl strategy on the importance and essentials of good leadership.
6. Students and teacher will then review the information presented on the handout.

Culminating Activity:

1. The students will be given a past paper question to complete in their books. This will be graded.

Active Learning

  • 24 April 2018
  • Posted by: Sabrina Lemonius
  • Number of views: 687
  • 0 Comments
Active Learning
Students’ age range: 16-18
Main subject: Not specified
Topic: Active Learning vs Didactic Learning Approach
 
Description: Active Learning Active learning is generally defined as any instructional method that engages students in the learning process. In short, active learning requires students to do meaningful learning activities and think about what they are doing. While this definition could include traditional activities such as homework, in practice, active learning refers to activities that are introduced into the classroom. The core elements of active learning are student activity and engagement in the learning process. Active learning is often contrasted to the traditional lecture where students passively receive information from the instructor. In the traditional approach to college teaching, most class time is spent with the profesor lecturing and the students watching and listening. The students work individually on assignments, and cooperation is limited. Such teacher-centered instructional methods have repeatedly been found inferior to instruction that involves active learning, in which students solve problems, answer questions, formulate questions of their own, discuss, explain, debate, or brainstorm during class. Active Learning vs Diadactic Learning Approach 1. Teacher centered: based on the assumption that the teacher is the primary agent in learning. A 1. Problem centered: based on the assumption that the student is the primary agent in learning. D 2. Teacher's role: to impart the results of experience, personal study, and reflection. A 2. Teacher's role: to uncover the question that the answer hides. To be a co-learner. D 3. Primarily deductive: the usual methods are lecture, story-telling, use of analogy, and aphorism. A 3. Primarily inductive: the usual methods discussion, dialogue, and problem solving. D 4. Test of truth: authority and experience. A 4. Test of truth: reason and evidence. D 5. Learning is the reception of ideas. A 5. Learning is a conflict of ideas: a thesis, antithesis, and a synthesis that results in new knowledge. D 6. Student's role: to be passive, open, receptive, trusting, and unquestioning. A 6. Student's role: to be active, questioning, critical, and discriminating learning to trust one's own judgment (independent thinking). D 7. Evaluation is factual recall of data commonly in the form of objective tests right and wrong answers. A 7. Evaluation is application of understanding interpretation of data commonly in an essay, speech, journal, or a review. D 8. Ultimate goal: wisdom viewed as the internalization of truths and beliefs. A 8. Ultimate goal: wisdom viewed as an informed ignorance (knowing what one does not know the Socratic paradox). D Example "active leaning" activities class discussion, small group discussion, debate, posing questions to the class, think-pair-share activities, short written exercises and polling the class (Bonwell and Eison, 1991). A class discussion may be held in person or in an online environment. It is best that these discussions be centered on an open-ended (occasionally controversial) topic...

Measurement in our everyday life

  • 24 April 2018
  • Posted by: SANAE CAMPBELL
  • Number of views: 792
  • 0 Comments
Measurement in our everyday life
Students’ age range: 10-12
Main subject: Mathematics
Topic: Measurement
 
Description: Students in their pairs will try to define the term “measurement” they will fill out a KWL chart about measurement. K – telling what they KNOW, W- stating WHAT they want to know and L- what they have Learn (this section is completed at the end of the lesson. The students will then discuss what they have in common. The teacher will do a whole group discussion and then fill out the K and W section on the chart on her board.
The students will then watch a video that tells them about measuring instruments and what they are used to measure. After watching the videos the students will then be given a set of occupations and some measuring instruments. In their pairs they are required to match an occupation with an instrument. They should be able to state how this is used by these professionals/ skilled workers. There will then be a large group discussion where we discuss the matches that have been made and we make corrections where necessary.

Write an article for the local/school

  • 24 April 2018
  • Posted by: Jorge Cordon
  • Number of views: 259
  • 0 Comments
Write an article for the local/school
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: News reporter on current events
 
Description: Research. With their partner, students carry out a brief research or investigation in the local news to seek possible news regarding the recent events or developments in their school, community, or country. Students discuss among themselves the relevance and validity of the news found. Then, they select one news article each to develop and write about. Teacher counsels on their choices.
Brainstorm. Students think about all the details each might want to include in their story. To aid in classifying the information, students may use the following categories to organize their ideas into paragraphs:
- Introduce the selected event by listing what has happened regarding it and around it; what people think about the event; what you think about it.
- Describe the background and narrate how things were before the event; what made the event come to happen.
- Analyze the significance of the event by narrating why it is relevant or important; how it is helping the community / school / country; what impact it may have in the future of the community / school / country.
Teacher aids in the management of time and keeping them on task.

Outline. Students organize their ideas into an outline using the following guidelines:
- Write a Thesis Statement that supports the background information and the significance of the event to the community….
- Write a Topic Sentence for each of the two body paragraphs: I- background of the event, and II- significance of the event.
- Write at least three supportive information sentences for each body paragraph.

Students share their outlines and do peer response. Discussion of their opinions and constructive criticism is encouraged. Teacher aids with difficulties that arise in their writing and thinking.

Draft. Using the present perfect tense to introduce the topic and complementing with other tenses where appropriate, students write a first draft of their story by following the revised outline.

Editing. Once completed the first draft, students lay it aside for some time and/or make themselves available to be peers to others. With fresh eyes, they read it again and check their writing for grammar, spelling, and punctuation mistakes, which they mark. Having read their draft, students write a clean copy.

Peer Response. Working with the partner, students help each other decide how to fix the mistakes found when editing and how to improve the content of the narrated event.

Draft as much as needed. Repeat the process as many times as you consider is needed, each time using peer response.

Final Draft or Publishing. Write the final copy once you consider your writing is to your satisfaction and your peer liking.

Comprehension

  • 24 April 2018
  • Posted by: Naudia Mckay-Dean
  • Number of views: 1086
  • 2 Comments
Comprehension
Students’ age range: 10-12
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Explicit and Implicit Meaning in Text
 
Description:
Teacher will present students with hand-outs with the compass point template. They will be told that we will be Reading about the Black River, a famous river in Jamaica. They be instructed to fill in the spaces with the information required; for example: what do I need to know about the Black River? What excites me about the Black River… and so on.

Development
Step 1
Students will be taken on a virtual tour of the Black River using the Smart board and computer. They will be told to imagine that they are on the boat and to record their feelings and observations as they tour the área.

Step 2
Students will share their answers to the compass point activity and the simulation activity. They will listen to and share their opinions.
Step 3
Unfamiliar words from the passage will be written on the board. Students will say which ones they have Heard before and which ones are completely new. They will be told that while we read, they will be required to use context-clues skills to determine the meanings of these words.
Step 4
Students will take turns to read the passage, pausing at strategic points to discuss the information and to define words highlighted.They will also match their Compass point information with what they are actually Reading and say whether they were correct or not. What new information are we learning?
Step 5
Students will be placed in pairs. They will be given five questions base don the passge. They will arrange these questions under two columns: Implicit and Explicit meanings. Answers will be discussed
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