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Poetry - Night of the Scorpion

  • 25 April 2018
  • Posted by: Davina Bethel
  • Number of views: 754
  • 0 Comments
Poetry - Night of the Scorpion
Students’ age range: 12-14
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Literature Poetry - Night of the Scorpion by Nissim Ezekiel
 
Description: 4. Development:Teacher Identifies the criteria for analyzing a poem at BJC level. You must always keep in mind An awareness or appreciation of: Content, Language, Style, Tone, Structure 5. Teacher Instructs students to read the poem night of the scorpion. First line by line. Secondly sentence by sentence following stanza by stanza. 6. Teacher -In 4 groups students are instructed to find the figurative devices used. Indicate and quote the line. (Personification, Simile, Metaphor, Alliteration, Onomatopoeia) 7. Student find indicate and quote the line (written). 8. Teacher instructs 3 groups student to locate from computer/ internet brief information on Hindu belief of reincarnation and discusses religions in the Bahamas and superstitions of Bahamians.. Students Each group report their findings. 10. Teacher Instruct students to watch power point which gives information on the poet and analyses the poem almost line by line. 11. Students at this time will be able to see if their group predictions and quotes were correct. 12. Teacher instructs student to complete the Compass Point (Active Learning Strategy) the poet has made use of various types of imagery: Visual imagery • scorpion crawling beneath a sack of rice • peasants came like swarms of flies Smell imagery • smell of candles • smell of burning oil in the lanterns Tactile experience • scorpion biting the mother • father pouring paraffin on the toe. Internal sensation • fear • pain Sound imagery • buzzed the name of god a hundred times • they clicked their tongues 13. Student Excitement – I can detect the images created by the poet to bring the characters in the poem to life. I can identify figurative language used in poetry. Needs – Need to be clear on what imagery is and the different types of figurative language used in poetry. Stance/Steps – Research the use of imagery and figurative language in poetry in order to analyze the poem. Worries - Not being able to identify the images and figurative language used in the poem. Development Days 2 go to three if needed 3 14. Teacher Instructs students to now arrange themselves into a Fish Bowl (Active Learning Strategy) to discuss the full analysis of a poem. Content - Subject matter of the poem or what it is about; • Also includes the message of the poem and its tone. (The poem is about the night when a woman (the poet's mother) in a poor village in India is stung by a scorpion. Concerned neighbours pour into her hut to offer advice and help. All sorts of cures are tried by the neighbours, her husband and the local holy man, but time proves to be the best healer - 'After twenty hours / it lost its sting.') Language • The poet’s choice of vocabulary; • Must comment on choice of words and how effective they are. (The poem is written in first person, should be able to pick out clue words that awake diction) Style • How the poet chooses to write; • The devices that they use. (The poem is written in first person, using lots of figurative language) Tone...

Acquiring Content for Persuasive Essays

  • 25 April 2018
  • Posted by: Judith Whyte
  • Number of views: 245
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Acquiring Content for Persuasive Essays
Students’ age range: 12-14
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Persuasive Writing
 
Description: Engagement
Students will role-play a scene where someone is sick and goes to the hospital for medical treatment.
Exploration
Students will be placed in two groups. They will be given the topic: It should become a law that all patients pay hospital fees.(Currently, the situation in Jamaica is that patients do not pay hospital fees). One group will give reasons why they disagree with the topic and the other group will give reasons why they agree with the topic. This will be a discussion session
Explain
Students will then individually write three pros for the topic or three cons against the topic, based on which groups they were previously in. Students will share at least one pro or one con with the group
Elaborate
Students will decide if the arguments put forward are major or minor arguments. Students will then research online for countries that have similar policies as well as those who have different policies

Dictionary Skills

  • 25 April 2018
  • Posted by: Shelby McNeil
  • Number of views: 633
  • 0 Comments
Dictionary Skills
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Denotation and Connotation
 
Description: Engagement
In order to engage the students, some students will be pre – selected to participate in a mini drama piece. In this piece, a “player” will be described as being “sharp” by his friends, while he is being described as a “snake” by girls who found out his deeds. The students will be explicitly asked to keep the skit short and appropriate/clean. The remainder of the class will be asked to view the presentation and listen carefully for the adjectives being used to describe the individual.
At the end of the presentation, the students will be engaged in a discussion whereas they will be given the opportunity to share their responses based on the skit.
Explore
Further discussions will be stimulated by asking directed questions such as: Why do you think the individual was described as a player? Why was he described as being “sharp” as well as a “snake?” The students’ expected response will be framed based on their personal experiences or that of others. As such, they are expected to respond by speaking to the fact that he could woo girls easily or he had a lot of girls and he was referred to as a snake because he secretly used girls or he was sneaky and dishonest.
The students will later be asked to use their dictionaries to find the meaning/s of the words. The definitions will be written on the board.
The students will later be asked to comment on the use of the words in the skit as opposed to the dictionary meaning – why they used the words in the skit.
At this point, the students will be introduced to the terms: connotative and denotative meanings.
Explain
At this point, the students will view a video that will explain/expound on the two terms mentioned above. The students will later be asked directed questions based on the video so as to facilitate discussion. Clarifications will be made and feedback given at this point also.
The students will then be required to record relevant information in their notebooks that the teacher will provide based on the topic being explored.
The students, based on the definition of the words, will be asked to share their own examples of words that have a connotative and denotative meaning. Feedback and clarifications will be made.
Extend/Elaborate
At this point, the students will be given an activity that will require them to think about the following colours: white, blue, black, red and purple. For each one, the students will be required to brainstorm the ideas, moods and feelings they associate with the colours. They will also be required to keep a record of their suggestions.
b. They will also be required to think of any well – known phrases which include these colors, for example: as white as snow.
Evaluation
At this point, the students will be tested on their ability to group/ categorize words and/or phrases based on their connotative, denotative or neutral meaning in a table. In other words, they will state whethe...

Identifying ‘the main idea’ and ‘supporting details’ in writing.

  • 25 April 2018
  • Posted by: Marko Scantlebury
  • Number of views: 140
  • 0 Comments
Identifying ‘the main idea’ and ‘supporting details’ in writing.
Students’ age range: 10-12
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Comprehension
 
Description: Students will view a video presentation entitled ‘Batman versus Superman’ and the teacher will ask several questions such as “What is video about?”, “State two things that recall from the video” and ‘Which part of the video did you enjoy the most?” to generate discussion. Answers will be conferred and students asked if they could guess what will be discussed today. The teacher will introduce the lesson.
Learning Activities/Experiences:
The students will be asked to recall meanings of the terms, ‘main idea’ and ‘supporting details’ in their own words. Students will understand the concept of finding the main idea and supporting details.
The teacher will organize students in groups and engage them in “Two-Minute Talks”, an activating strategy. Students will listen attentively and follow the instructions of the teacher. They will be asked to read a short information passage on elephants.

Students will work in pairs and share by brainstorming everything they know about elephants. Students will retell a portion of their findings in their “two-minute talks” or the fishbowl technique to share ideas and evaluate written information and the information presented by their peers.
The teacher will do a close reading of a comprehension passage about elephants questioning students before, during and after the reading. Then, students will re-read passage and complete their assessment.

Poetry

  • 24 April 2018
  • Posted by: Jessie Moxey
  • Number of views: 82
  • 1 Comments
Poetry
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Show how Owen's use of imagery in his poem "Dulce et decorum est" brings out his anti war feelings about war.
 
Description: Teacher’s Steps

Introduction:

1.Show a 2minute video clipping from the poem showing soldiers fighting


Development of lesson:

Using the Socratic method, teacher elicits from students their feelings about war.

Next they get ten minutes to prepare a mini debate about war:

Four students with pro ideas go to the centre and voice their opinions while the others listen and rake notes. This is done until all teams have a turn

Fort he remaining time students will listen to the poem being rea don You tube and follow on their sheets

For homework they should select the appropriate imagery that fit Owen’s anti war outlook

Describe the evaluation process / evaluation instrument (150 wordsmax):
They make comments on the clipping and have mini discussions
She praises and commends the students answers

She rewards them for their performance

Students listen and follow and she commends them
Students’ Evaluation:
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