Lessons Plans

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Introduction to Mandarin

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Julie Campbell
  • Number of views: 70
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Introduction to Mandarin
Students’ age range: 12-14
Main subject: Foreign languages
Topic: Introduction to Mandarin, Culture and Pronunciation
 
Description: 1. Think on questions such as – “Where is Mandarin spoken? What does it sound like?”, pair for research, as a whole class, students share what they find.

2. Notes covering these main points are sent to students in advance so they can preview the basics of the language structure. In class, they summarize and discuss the differences in triads with assigned roles (a secretary, investigator and discussion moderator). Moderators present each group’s findings to the class and new groups give feedback to either add or question facts presented.

3. Essential questions are presented in a fish bowl discussion – “How much cultural understanding is required to become competent in using a language? How can I explore and describe cultures without stereotyping them?” Teacher models examples good and bad of speaking about the culture to get students started. Students judge the statements as being stereotypical or non-stereotypical.

4. Pronunciation drills of 4 tones and examples of how changes of tone affect meaning. Students independently work on pinyin strings using an online interactive pinyin chart. Then, in pairs, they test each other step by step – first initials, then finals and then full pinyin strings with tone symbols. Teacher isolates the most difficult points of pronunciation for English-speakers and creates a graphic organizer on the board for students to note.

5. In groups, create and critique a list of criteria for learning the language from a free technology-based resource. They then decide on the best aspects needed and begin research in pairs to look for the best apps, blogs, video playlists etc.

What is Summarizing?

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Adderley Lisa
  • Number of views: 35
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What is Summarizing?
Students’ age range: 12-14
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Summarizing
 
Description: Introduction: Play the game called, “Pass It On”. Students were placed in a circle and a message was whispered to one of the students. That message was relayed to the next student until everyone in the circle had passed on the message they received. This game allowed students to use their sense of hearing, develop listening and speaking skills and practice the use of their memory skills.



Teacher Activities Students Activities

1. Whisper secret message to a student. 1. Pass the secret message on to student next to them.


2. Ask last student to share the message 2. Discuss message.
they heard.

3. Draw students attentionto pictures 3. Discuss pictures. Record main idea and details on
displayed depicting the effects of a graphic organizer.
powerful wind.

4. Have volunteers write their summaries 4. Share sumaries with class.
on dry erase board.

5. Distribute Scholastic Teaching Resources 5. Work in pairs to complete worksheet.
Main Idea & Summarizing Book, Share summaries with class.
“What is Summarizing?”
Learning Page, pages 9 & 30.


Conclusion: Have volunteers recap the steps to writing a good summary.





Food Groups

  • 25 April 2018
  • Posted by: Eleanor Brown-Simpson
  • Number of views: 203
  • 0 Comments
Food Groups
Students’ age range: 12-14
Main subject: Not specified
Topic: The six Caribbean food groups
 
Description: Different food items were placed on the head table in the classroom.
The topic and objectives were written on the whiteboard and explain to the students
Students were placed in groups of six
Each group was given 5 minutes to go to the table and arrange the food items into the six Caribbean food groups (writing information down in their notebooks)
The written information was checked and feedback given to students after they explained why they chose to put the food items into a particular group
Groups were also asked to use their cellphones, tablets or text books to research the importance of eating from the food groups
The food groups charts were mounted after students had finished their discussions for them to see what the groups looked like and as a feedback tool
Groups were given stars in their notebooks for effort

Describe your favorite place to visit using adjectives and sensory details

  • 25 April 2018
  • Posted by: Indiana Caldera
  • Number of views: 773
  • 0 Comments
Describe your favorite place to visit using adjectives and sensory details
Students’ age range: 16-18
Main subject: Arts education
Topic: Descriptive paragraph
 
Description: First session, teacher selected 3 students at random to form groups of 3. Students worked in groups. They created a list of interesting places they had visited, and wrote details about each place, so they completed one chart of graphic organizer about their description. After that they chose the place they would like to write a descriptive paragraph.
Second session of class, they wrote an outline about ideas for their description and organized their topic sentence, supporting ideas and examples. They thought about evidence to support their descriptive paragraph. Also, teacher and students elaborated some critical thinking questions about the topic.
Third session of class, teacher applied Socratic seminar. Teacher explained the rules and after that they set up inner and outer circles. Students listened closely the descriptions of his/her favorite places, thought critically and said comments about the responses of their partners, and the final activity was discussion about seminar with the whole class. They learned vocabulary, phrases and knew beautiful places from their country.

Argumentative essay

  • 25 April 2018
  • Posted by: Patrina Morris Bain
  • Number of views: 585
  • 0 Comments
Argumentative essay
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: The education system is failing our students. The system is not diverse enough and does not met the needs of many students.
 
Description: Before the lesson, students will be told that they will participate in an exercise called a fishbowl discussion. The teacher will ask them to describe an actual fish bowl and its purpose in order for them to make analogies and try to guess why this strategy has been so named. Students may write their thoughts freely on how they think the lesson will proceed. The students will then be shown a short video clip of the fishbowl strategy being used in a classroom. They will be asked to share their views on how they think this can be helpful to them. Again, students will be asked to write their thoughts freely on this. The protocol will be explained to the students and the classroom will be arranged accordingly – five chairs in the middle of the room and the other ten forming an audience around the inner circle. The students will be told to make any necessary notes which they think will help the discussion or which will help them clarify their thoughts. They will be told that they are expected to listen to each other and respect each other’s opinions. If they do not agree or if they have a counter-argument, they must not be judgemental but rather, speak constructively and think about all opinions offered as they try to arrive at their own conclusions. They will be told to try to provide evidence to support their claims. They will be unable to interrupt a speaker and each person must wait until her turn to speak. The topic will be intoduced and all students will be given five minutes to write their thoughts on it. A few articles on the topic will then be circulated among the students in order to help them generate discussion. Students will continue to make notes or write their thoughts and this will continue throughout the lesson. The topic will be displayed on a whiteboard for the duration of the lesson. The first five students will then enter the inner circle and the discussion will proceed. When the students have completed ten minutes within the inner circle, members of the outer cirlce will have an opportunity to ask questions. This will be done for five minutes before the next group takes their place in the inner circle. The lesson will be recorded on an iphone and replayed afterwards in order to let the students evaluate both themselves and the technique. The teacher will intervene as a facilitator when necessary.
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