Lessons Plans

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Comprehension

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Devmarie Blake-Brown
  • Number of views: 51
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Comprehension
Students’ age range: 10-12
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Facts vs. Opinions
 
Description: Implementation:
1. In small groups, view newspaper clippings and journal articles/excerpts on the issue (‘Integrity is the most important factor for prosperity’) using a technological device of their choice.
2. Using the fish bowl strategy, share their thoughts or ideas on the topic.
3. As individuals create and complete a pros and cons grid stating 3 points (using phrases) on sticky notes for each column of the grid.
4. Share these ideas orally for further discussion.

Persuasive Writing

  • 25 April 2018
  • Posted by: CARLENE BRYAN
  • Number of views: 66
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Persuasive Writing
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: the persuasive speech
 
Description: Introductory Activity (Engagement) o Through activation of schema, the teacher will facilitate a brainstorming sessión of the concept of language as a tool for persuasión. o Students will be asked to contemplate upon the purpose of persuavive texts, various types of persuasive texts and how they are used to enhance our daily lives. o The responses will be jotted down on the white board. o The teacher will then inform students the persuasion is intended to convince us to feel, think or act a certain way. Developmental Activities (Exploration, Explanation & Elaboration) Exploration o Students will then be encouraged to relate from their experiencial backgrounds, any memorable/ impactful speakers and speeches they have heard and state what made the speeches impactful. o Next, an excerpt from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.s’ ‘I have a dream’ speech will be played using an audio visual médium and students will listen keenly and follow the written text on a handout. o Volunteers will be guided into commenting on the speech and its effect in illuminating the issue of brotherhood and peace. Explanation o From the discussion and presentation, students will be guided into formulating a comprehensive definition for the term ‘persuasive speech’ through discovery learning. o Students had previously learned about persuasive techniques and devices. As a measure of memory retention and critical thinking, they will engage in an activity using the fishing bowl. o A fishing bowl with ten persuasive techniques will be presented and students will select one piece of paper with a technique. Each student will be asked to orally explain his/ her persuasive technique selected to the class. o Students’ questions and responses with then be accommodated. Elaboration o Next, students will work in pairs to find and circle as many examples of persuasive devices as they can from the Martin Luther King Jr.’s speech. o Additionally, they will use a graphic organiser to comment on the effectiveness of each device which will be shared with the class. o The teacher will model the activity by giving them the following example: Text: I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. Effectiveness: this is a metaphor. It compares the racially unjust state of Mississippi to an unwelcoming place overcome by unjust and inhumane practices. He desires to see a transformation where it becomes a safe haven and place of freedom for all. The metaphor highlights the seriousness of the issue and evokes strong emotions of hurt and pain in the reader towards the system of injustice. o The responses will be shared with the class and students will comment on the varying responses given. o Through the use of probing questions and reader’s response, students will be inclined to actively participate in the process.

Identifying ‘the main idea’ and ‘supporting details’ in writing.

  • 25 April 2018
  • Posted by: Marko Scantlebury
  • Number of views: 84
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Identifying ‘the main idea’ and ‘supporting details’ in writing.
Students’ age range: 10-12
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Comprehension
 
Description: Students will view a video presentation entitled ‘Batman versus Superman’ and the teacher will ask several questions such as “What is video about?”, “State two things that recall from the video” and ‘Which part of the video did you enjoy the most?” to generate discussion. Answers will be conferred and students asked if they could guess what will be discussed today. The teacher will introduce the lesson.
Learning Activities/Experiences:
The students will be asked to recall meanings of the terms, ‘main idea’ and ‘supporting details’ in their own words. Students will understand the concept of finding the main idea and supporting details.
The teacher will organize students in groups and engage them in “Two-Minute Talks”, an activating strategy. Students will listen attentively and follow the instructions of the teacher. They will be asked to read a short information passage on elephants.

Students will work in pairs and share by brainstorming everything they know about elephants. Students will retell a portion of their findings in their “two-minute talks” or the fishbowl technique to share ideas and evaluate written information and the information presented by their peers.
The teacher will do a close reading of a comprehension passage about elephants questioning students before, during and after the reading. Then, students will re-read passage and complete their assessment.

Introduction to Expository Writing

  • 24 April 2018
  • Posted by: Erin Knowles
  • Number of views: 491
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Introduction to Expository Writing
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Writing the Thesis Statement
 
Description: Each group of two students will be given a think-pair-share worksheet as well as a topic. (Topics include: the consequences of dropping out of school, why do you admire a person, why parents are sometimes strict, why do you enjoy a particular teacher, explain how moving from place to place affects teens, explain the major stressors in a teens life, explain why you like or don’t like working in a team?)

The teacher will explain the purpose of expository writing is to explain a topic in a logical and straightforward manner. Without bells and whistles, expository writing presents a fair and balanced analysis of a subject based on facts, with no references to the writer's opinions or emotions.

Encourage students to complete the think and pair section of the worksheet with their ideas and their partner's ideas on the topic.

Model a thesis statement for the group, ask them to explain what I just did and what purpose that would serve. Establish that a thesis statement is generally a complete sentence that outlines the writers stand and three main points to support that stand.

Project sample statements on the board and ask each group to evaluate what the statement includes or is missing.

Encourage students to return to their group and créate a thesis statement in the SHARE column that combines their ideas on the topic.
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