Lessons Plans

Resources Map

See the resources in an interactive map.

Entrevista

  • 23 April 2018
  • Posted by: Yolanda Michelle Morales Gómez
  • Number of views: 36
  • 0 Comments
Entrevista
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Foreign languages
Topic: how do I ask about pleoples information?
 
Description: First we talk about the first time you meet someone, and the first intercourse is about questions, starting for What´s your name? and it will depend on the contexts and kind of relationship that people agree to give some personal information to make connections. So, the teacher asks about common questions on a first date. The students make a list of 5 to 10 questions to get to know somebody. Later on, they will show them to the teacher to make sure the structure of the questions are written with a good grammar. After they practice, asking the questions to the teacher, so She or He makes sure the pronunciation of the student has proper speech, fluency and rhythm. The final activity is to take the questions, and make an interview to a partner and collect information that is going to be recorded on their smartphone to show the teacher at the end.

How to Improve Reading Comprehesion through the Creation of Different Types of Questions

  • 23 April 2018
  • Posted by: Diana Navarro
  • Number of views: 73
  • 0 Comments
How to Improve Reading Comprehesion through the Creation of Different Types of Questions
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: The Island of Dr. Moreau, Chapters 1-5
 
Description: Teacher plays paragraph # 1 of audiobook: The Island of Dr. Moreau – Chapter 1
Teacher asks Ss to define what MAIN IDEA refers to as a reading strategy. T: What is the main idea of the paragraph we have just read? Students provide answers.
Teacher explains the three levels of reading comprehension: literal, inferential, and evaluative.
Teacher models how to take notes in the margins and how to create different types of questions: literal, inferential, and evaluative by eliciting answers from students.
Teacher hands out reading instructions WS: students must create a # questions at a certain level.
While the class listens to the audiobook for Chs. 1, Ss contribute with information to write in the margins and create at least 10 questions (overall).
Students read Ch. 2 at home and create a # of different types of questions per chapter.
While the class listens to the audiobook for Chs. 3, Ss contribute with information to write in the margins and create at least 10 questions (overall).
Students read Ch. 4 at home and create a # of different types of questions per chapter.
Teacher uses Ss’ evaluative questions in order to start a discussion of Chs. 1-5. Students are required to support their answers with specific examples.

Using definition to figure the meaning of an underlined word

  • 23 April 2018
  • Posted by: Jannice Ross-May
  • Number of views: 42
  • 0 Comments
Using definition to figure the meaning of an underlined word
Students’ age range: 06-08
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Using context clues
 
Description: Step 1:
• Teacher displays reading of short story on the board using a chart or projector.
• Teacher models the reading to the students by reading the story aloud.
• Students follows along as teacher reads story.
• Teacher then asks students to read the story aloud together as a whole class, while teacher assist along the way if needed.
• Students read story with appropriate pacing and fluency.
• Teacher asks students to make connection to what they have just read, by stating their experience if any with the story. (text to self, text to text or text to world)
• Students volunteer to make connection to the text.
• Teacher asks students questions based on the story they read.
• Students answer questions in complete sentence orally and then written.

Sentence level
Step2:
• In groups of four teacher distributes short passages to students with selected words underlined. Students are asked to figure the meaning of the underlined words using clues in the passage.
• Students read passage and use think aloud to figure the meaning of the word which is underlined.
• Teaching visit each group and offer assistance by asking leading questions to help students bring out the meaning of each word.
• Students share answers with whole class about they think the meaning of the word is and what clues they use to figure it out.
Step3:
• Teacher then explains to students what they are doing is using context clues to decipher the meaning of unknown words.
• Teacher then states that there are different types of context clues and what they are using is context clues by definition.
• Teacher then displays chart on the board about context clues
• Students and teacher read and discuss contents of the chart.
Step 4:
• Teacher distributes graphic organizers and sentence stripes to students in groups to figure out the meaning of the underlined word using clues in the sentences.
• Students use clues in the sentence to come up with the meaning of the underlined word.
• Differentiation- Teacher works with struggling and weaker students in small groups by reading sentences and asking probing and leading questions.
• Students in each group share their answers.


Plot Development- My Father Sun Sun Johnson by C. Everard Palmer

  • 23 April 2018
  • Posted by: Tracia Morgan-Brown
  • Number of views: 67
  • 0 Comments
Plot Development- My Father Sun Sun Johnson by C. Everard Palmer
Students’ age range: 12-14
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Plot
 
Description: ? The teacher will lead the students in a discussion about the following:
1. What are the qualities should a man/woman should seek to find in a man/woman before he/she marries him/her?
2. What are your views on divorce?
3. How are children affected by divorce?
4. How are parents affected by divorce?
5. How kind should, one be?

? After discussion, students will volunteers to read sections of chapters one and two of novel.
? Teacher will stop students at regular intervals and initiate discussions about important sections, for example:
1. ‘I was there when the blow fell. And Father took it like a man.’
2. ‘Father had borrowed money against his property from Jake.’
3. Page 9 line 14, page 11 line 6 etc.
The students will underline the important sections in their books for future reference.

READING: HOW RICH ARE WE?

  • 23 April 2018
  • Posted by: YOLA CHICA
  • Number of views: 104
  • 0 Comments
READING: HOW RICH ARE WE?
Students’ age range: 16-18
Main subject: Foreign languages
Topic: READING COMPREHENSION: HOW RICH ARE WE?
 
Description: Pre-reading activities
By reading the title of the text and by looking at a picture of a tree with bills instead of leaves the students predict what the reading will be about. Also, they answer some questions such as where the story takes place, when it happens, who are the characters of the story. The answers are copied on the board without confirming any one of them.
Afterwards, the teacher asks them to match some words with their definitions.
Words Definition
____Country
____Trip
____Pool
____Creek
____Yard
____Whole
____Horizon
____Speechless a. the line that forms the apparent limit between earth and sky
b. a small body of still water
c. entire
d. silent, mute
e. journey, voyage
f. rural districts
g. arroyo
h. garden, field

While reading activities
1. The teacher asks the students to read the story How Rich Are We, by an unknown author, and to confirm the ideas they had about it.

How Rich Are We?
One day a father and his rich family took his son on a trip to the country with the firm purpose to show him how poor people can be. They spent a day and a night on the farm of a very poor family. When they got back from their trip, the father asked his son, "How was the trip?" "Very good Dad!" "Did you see how poor people can be?" the father asked. "Yeah!" "And what did you learn?"
The son answered, "I saw that we have a dog at home, and they have four. We have a pool that reaches to the middle of the garden; they have a creek that has no end. We have imported lamps in the garden; they have the stars. Our patio reaches to the front yard; they have a whole horizon." When the little boy was finished, his father was speechless. His son added, "Thanks, Dad, for showing me how 'poor' we are!"
Isn't it true that it all depends on the way you look at things? If you have love, friends, family, health, good humor and a positive attitude towards life -- you've got everything! You can't buy any of these things. You may have all the material possessions you can imagine, provisions for the future, etc.; but if you are poor of spirit, you have nothing! ( Author Unknown) http://www.jokearchives.com/inspire/howricharewe.html


2. The students have to read the story again. They will work in pairs, and then they will answer the following questions:
1. What is the main purpose of the author for writing this story?
2. What do you think the question in mind of the author were when he/she wrote the story?
3. What facts, experiences, or data the author uses for supporting his/conclusions?
4. What are the main conclusions in this story?
5. What are the key concept(s) we need to understand in this story?
6. What are the main assumption(s) underlying the author’s thinking?
7. What consequences are likely to follow if people take the author’s line of reasoning seriously?
8....
RSS
First891011121314151617Last