Lesson Plans - Details

Slavery

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Kellie Brown
  • Number of views: 141
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Slavery
Students’ age range: 12-14
Main subject: Social studies
Topic: Slave Resistance
 
Description: Teacher will:
Have students watch a short video of slavery. After watching the video the teacher will ask students to express their thoughts on what they watched
Discuss with the class how slaves resisted enslavement.

Additionally, the teacher will discuss with students the slave revolt in Exuma. How it came about, Who was involved and was it successful?

Instruct students pretend to be slave during the slave revolt in Exuma. Draw a map of an escape route. The map must have all of the parts of a map.
Have students as a class role play the Pompey Revolt

An Educational Deal to Receive a Well Treatment

  • 25 April 2018
  • Posted by: Celeste Fueyo
  • Number of views: 170
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  An Educational Deal to Receive a Well Treatment
Students’ age range: 16-18
Main subject: Not specified
Topic: Human rights in education
 
Description: Introduction Briefly summarize learning from the previous lesson. Key points: • What is a right? ‘A moral or legal entitlement to have or do something.’
• Discuss the link between rights and responsibility. Explain that rights go hand in hand with responsibilities. When you have a right, you also have a responsibility to respect that others have that right.
• Explain that human rights are the rights we have as human beings. They belong to all of us, regardless of who we are or where we live, and they cannot be taken away.
1- Introduce the concept and history of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights by watching the video in Youtube
• Show students the slides and briefly explain how the Universal Declaration of Human Rights came into being. Ask students to brainstorm why the Universal Declaration might have been important.
Explain to students that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights protects our fundamental human rights, and it is important to know what these rights are.
• Explore and discuss the meaning of the rights in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
• As a class, consider the pictures presented in the activity.
• Explain that each of the four rights displayed on the slide are rights from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
• Ask students to choose which of the four rights displayed is being represented in the picture. Explain to students that the picture may show a right being respected or not respected.
Who do you think should be responsible for upholding the rights in the Universal Declaration? Look at these
rights from the Universal Declaration and drag and drop the group (or groups) that should make sure that the
right is protected and respected.
No one shall be subject to arbitrary arrest, detention or exile.
Nobody has the right to put you in prison, to keep you there, or to send you away from your country unjustly, or
without a good reason.
Judges and the Law Courts / Community / Businesses / Government / Individuals / The United Nations

Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security.
You have the right to live, and to live in freedom and safety.
Police / Community / Your Family / Government / Judges and the Law Courts / Individuals

Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion
You have the right to have your own religion or belief. This includes the right to change your religion or belief
if you want, to practice your religion either on your own or with other people and to peacefully express your
beliefs in teaching, practice and worship.
Community / the Media / Government / Individuals / Churches / The United Nations

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