Lesson Plans - Details

Learning and Discussing about Climate Change

  • 25 April 2018
  • Posted by: Maria Isabel Estevez
  • Number of views: 1251
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Learning and Discussing about Climate Change
Students’ age range: 18+
Main subject: Sciences
Topic: Climate Change
 
Description: The first step of the lesson will consist in preparing the classroom for the Fish Bowl activity with the help of the students. Chairs will be arranged in two circles: the small inner circle and the big outer circle. At this point, it is necessary to make sure to include one or two empty chairs in the inner circle. All the class is requested to sit before the teacher describes the topic of the discussion and provide information about the dynamic of the activity. Six to seven students will be invited and asked to participate voluntarily to start the Fish Bowl conversation while the rest of the class will be requested to become active observers and listeners. Only the inner circle can speak and share the ideas during the discussion. After about 8-10 minutes, students will start to leave and join the inner circle and so on until the whole group has participated. Students are allowed to take notes in a notebook as well in their phones. The teacher will be the moderator and will take notes in a notebook or the class’ blackboard although this last one is suggested since students can take notes or take a picture of the ideas written by the teacher on it at the end of the class. Links or documents with information about climate change will be provided to the students, so they can complement or learn more about the topic discussed in class.

Theme: Attitude towards Work or Nation Building

  • 25 April 2018
  • Posted by: Bobbette Barrett
  • Number of views: 247
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Theme: Attitude towards Work or Nation Building
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Poetry Appreciation: Identifying Literary Devices
 
Description: Engage: Six selected students will be asked to share their experience of either farming or the market place. Two of the students will talk about farming, two will talk about the market and two will illustrate through drawing of pictures of (one student) things that can be found in the market place and (one student) those used for farming. These accounts and drawings of experiences are geared towards helping students to understand and appreciate the time, effort and energy farmers put in to care for others by first caring for their crops. A brief revision on the literary devices looked at in class will be done to stimulate students’ prior knowledge which will be needed to make connections to this lesson. Students will be asked to explain five of the literary devices explored and provide one example of each: simile, metaphor, personification, alliteration, mood and tone. (15mins)
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Explore: Students will be asked to listen to a recorded reading of the poem “Market Women”. While they are listening, they should make note of all the words/phrases/expressions that they do not readily understand. These words will then be discussed and meanings clarified where ever necessary. (5 mins)
Expected words to be selected are in bold: Stride: walk stirred the steep dark: farmed the bred, and dug and reaped: cared for the plants and harvested them toil: work hand-maids: women
The students will be asked to turn to page 329 in The New Language Arts textbook and read aloud the poem: “Market Women” by Daisy Myrie in order to answer questions which will be posed to them later. After the reading, two students will be asked to explain the similarities and one student to explain the differences between the experiences shared at the beginning and the one shared in the poem. The intention here is to assist students to make the connection between the written work and the real-life experiences. (5 mins) ((The DRTA Strategy will be employed here.))

Explain: Students will now be asked to think critically about the farmers’ attitude towards farming as well as feeding the town people and share how they know the farmers care about/for the food they grow. This will be done individually. Two selected students will be asked to state and support the mood that can be found at the end of the poem. Teacher input and feedback will be provided when and where needed. (15mins)

Extended: Students will now be given a list of questions relating to the poem which they will answer in their notebooks. These questions are to further assist students to understand and appreciate the creative beauty of the poem as well as the experience shared through words. (15mins)
Questions:
What does the poet suggest about farming?
Which word(s) best describe(s) the mood of the market women?
List two of the literary devices used in the poem and explain each effectiveness in enhancing the theme emerging from it. What is the poet’s feeli...

Physical and Chemical Changes

  • 25 April 2018
  • Posted by: Moya-Dean Walcott
  • Number of views: 103
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Physical and Chemical Changes
Students’ age range: 12-14
Main subject: Sciences
Topic: Physical and Chemical Changes
 
Description: Introduction
Anticipation guide is issued to all students which contain statements about physical and chemical changes. Students will determine whether or not the statements are true.

Development
In groups of threes, students will read and discuss notes detailing the characteristics of physical and chemical changes for 20 minutes. Groups will then be given a handout with instructions for a practical activity. Students will read the instructions for 5 minutes. A further 5 minutes will be allotted for students to clarify the instructions if they are unclear. Groups will perform each activity and record all observations. Students will determine if the changes in each activity are physical or chemical based on observations and what was read. Class will discuss each activity to clarify misconceptions.

Why It Is Important to Have a Balanced Diet

  • 25 April 2018
  • Posted by: Jacqueline Strong Rhoden
  • Number of views: 678
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Why It Is Important to Have a Balanced Diet
Students’ age range: 10-12
Main subject: Sciences
Topic: Your Diet and Your Health
 
Description: Teacher will provide blank chart, scissors, glue, paper plates, rulers and magazines e.g. Good Housekeeping to students working in groups of two. Students will be collecting pictures of food items, classifying them into their food groups on a chart and also using some of the pictures to “prepare” a balanced meal on a paper plate. They will display their meals and explain why they believe their meal is balanced. The whole group will assess and critique each other’s meals. Teacher will circulate, observe classification of foods and listen to critique of meals by students.
Teacher will show a video/PowerPoint presentation of children and/or adults suffering from the effects of unbalanced diets, e.g. diets lacking in vitamins, (scurvy, rickets), protein (beriberi), carbohydrates (malnutrition), obesity, diabetes. Pause during presentation after each disease and discuss the consequences of not having a balanced diet in each case. Students will be asked how they feel about what they are seeing and discuss how they should treat persons who are affected by food-related illnesses. They should also be asked about their own food choices and discuss what changes they think they can make to their own choices at school and at home. Students will make a journal entry about how they feel about the presentation they have viewed and justify the need for eating healthy foods.
Teacher then places students in four groups of 3 and explain that they will use internet or other sources to research the following: Group 1 – obesity; Group 2 – malnutrition: Group 3 – Diabetes. Among themselves they will select one person each to present on (a) the causes of the disease (b) the prevention of the disease and (c) data about the number of persons suffering from the condition in Jamaica and/or the Caribbean. Group 4 will use internet or other sources to research the Ministry of Health promotions – “Jamaica Moves” and Sugar Free, and the public reaction to it (newspaper articles,cartoons, etc). They will be given one week to research and collect the information using tablets / computers at school, meet with group members and put their findings together. Explain to students that presentation will take the form of a Fish Bowl in which each student will present their assigned topic and field questions from classmates about their presentation.
On the day of presentation, rearrange classroom in a Fish Bowl. State or post rules – only one person should speak at a time; be respectful; hold questions until the end of each group presentation at which time they can be fielded. Seat students to present in the inner circle - causes, data and prevention for each disease, with audience in the outer circle. Group four will present on the promotions. At the end of the presentations, students will highlight what they have learned in a whole group discussion. They will make journal entries on what changes they will make to their own diets, and what changes they will encourage...

Cropping Systems

  • 25 April 2018
  • Posted by: Alreta Shearer - Sonlin
  • Number of views: 102
  • 0 Comments
Cropping Systems
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Not specified
Topic: Crop Management
 
Description: Engagement: Students will discuss in pairs what they think is a cropping system. Teacher and students will afterwards discuss the concept.

Exploration: Students will work in groups to brainstorm at least two cropping systems.

Explanation: Students will share the two cropping systems brainstormed. Teacher will discuss the cropping systems shared by the students and write other cropping systems on the board.

Elaboration / Extension: Students will differentiate between mixed cropping and mixed farming after viewing projected pictures. Teacher will provide correction where necessary.
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