Lesson Plans - Details

Writing about Reading

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Vincent Coakley
  • Number of views: 117
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Writing about Reading
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Better Writers make better readers and better readers tend to produce better writings.
 
Description: Understanding that better writers make better readers and better readers tend to produce better writers, my desire will be to introduce each student to focus intently on the text. Students will be given a paragraph to read aloud, and then summarize in three to four sentences. A discussion will follow where students impart their understanding of the text. Students will be guided through the four experiences when they are engage in critical thinking during writing assignments. We will explore, their thinking, and whether or not their assumptions are valued or reliable guides for action. Evident through experiential, authoritative, and discipline research evidence. They will discover how different view points, determine if their assumptions are accurate. Thought and analysis are key areas to impart during critical thinking. Students will explore the three types of assumptions that everyone makes according to Stephen Brookfield: i) Paradigmatic - How we frame the world; ii) Prescriptive - How we think the world should work and how people behave; iii) Causal - Why things happen the way they do. Finally, students will uncover through writing assignments the different writing purpose. Areas such as Summarizing, Narrating, Responding, Arguing/Persuading, Examining/Investing, Analyzing, and Evaluation. To do this they will be persuaded to engage in critical writing by starting with small, easily completed activities, making sure that students analyze a paragraph or a single page, before moving onward to advance writings. Critical reading and writing will be fully practiced during each class session. Their critical thinking and writing skills will be discovered. Peer review will also be encourage. Students will model ways to critique contents by using popular texts. Strategies such as graphic organizers, questioning fast writing, group composition, changing view points, varying forms and cubing.

The Three Billy Goats Gruff

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Julia Moore
  • Number of views: 747
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The Three Billy Goats Gruff
Students’ age range: 06-08
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Recalling details
 
Description: Students will be encouraged to listen to the story as they would be questioned at intervals.
The teacher will tell the students the title and proceed to read the story.
The story will be read with the teacher stopping at intervals to check listening skills. The following questions will be asked:
- What is the name of the story?
- How do you think the goats got their names?
- Where did they live?
- Why were they moving from one place to another?
- Who lived under the bridge?
- What happened when the little Billy Goat Gruff tried to cross the bridge?
- What did the little Billy Goat Gruff say?
- Was he/she allowed to go on the other side of the bridge?
- Who came along next?
- What happened to the second Billy Goat Gruff?
- Was he/she allowed to cross over the bridge?
Students will be called to dramatize parts of the story.
At the end of the story’s reading, students will be asked to propose a different ending to the story by responding to the questions below using the fish bowl strategy. There will be three groups and each group will be given one of the questions below. They will follow the structure of the fish bowl strategy. However, instead of tapping to enter the circle, there will be a time factor involved and each group will respond to all the questions.
- If you were the troll how would you feel about the goats using your bridge?
- If you were one of the goats would you have tried to go on the other side knowing that a troll lived under the bridge?
- If you were big Billy Goat Gruff would you butt the troll?
Students will begin to illustrate their favourite part of the story.

Comprehension

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Devin Saunds-Dunkley
  • Number of views: 660
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Comprehension
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Understanding Text Features
 
Description: There are two classes consisting of thirty-six studnets each that were taught the lesson over six sessions. The groups are being taught the curriculum for City and Guilds English Language which comes with core units that students must cover. Sessions were 80 minustes long and the lesson was covered in 6 sessions.
The lesson began with the students placed in small groups and the distribution of City and Guilds source documents to all students. The source documents which were colourful and had various text features on them that spanned the five categories. Students were asked to focus on questions related to the source document and the various features on it in their groups and select a reporter to respond to the questions and any other ideas they had about the source document.
Groups gave their responses and their points which ranged from having seen the some of the features before to knowing why some were used were note don the board for further discussion. Class is then led into a discussion where they are given the names of the categories under which the features fall and allowed to research each type of features and find examples on the source documents as well as from their research under each category. They will also look at the function of each of the features. Groups made their presentations to the class where they were critiqued by their peers and the teacher.
The students were then given an article on drugs taken from an English Language text and guided Reading followed. This was done to get the students understanding of the content as well as for them to identify the áreas for which they could use the text features to make the document more reader-friendly without losing the salient points from the article. Students were allowed to re-create their source document as a group homeowrk assignment and present their new source document for whole critiquing.
Students were allowed to interact with documents individually and in pairs where they recreated documents using text features and written assignments that involved them naming the features highlighted by the functions. Lesson ended with students individually completing a mini quizz involing matching and identifying text features that could be used in various areas of a given article


Location of classroom objects using prepositions

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Shirley Bovell
  • Number of views: 249
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Location of classroom objects using prepositions
Students’ age range: 12-14
Main subject: Foreign languages
Topic: Donde Esta
 
Description: I started the lesson by greeting the students and stating the objectives to be achieved. Then, I modeled Total Physical Response (TPR) expressing positional terms in the target language using (delante de, detrás de, debajo de, al lado de and encima de) while encouraging whole class participation. Next, they viewed a video using Spanish prepositions and were encouraged to repeat using the target language.

The students did the following in their learning activities:

• Viewed and read flash cards illustrating prepositions in Spanish and English.
• Responded to the question ¿dónde está? by expressing estoy with a Spanish preposition (and the student name) e.g. (estoy delante de Jasara). Multiple students were given the
opportunity to respond.
• Reviewed vocabulary related to preposition from the text book (page 129)
• Worked in groups to correctly match and sequence a set of flash cards in English and Spanish.
• Introduced está by using a student as a example. (Maria está detrás de la mesa).
• Specific students called other students and asked them to hold up their flash card and state where the person was giving appropriate responses in Spanish.
• Completed a written exercise by writing the correct preposition to fill the blanks.
• Students were assessed in the following ways:

In oral/written form to test correct expression and pronunciation while engaging with their peers and by completing a written exercise using prepositions appropriately.

The lesson ended with the students playing “Simon Dice”.

Sequencing Pictures to tell A Story

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Allison Bend
  • Number of views: 120
  • 0 Comments
Sequencing Pictures to tell A Story
Students’ age range: 06-08
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Sequencing
 
Description: Teacher had students view a brief clip with persons in disarray as well as those performing actions in logical order. This was done to make students aware of the topic to be discussed. Random students were then be chosen to demonstrate to the class steps they take when performing certain actions, for example cleaning shoes, dressing oneself and so on. Teacher asked students to recall what was done at various stages using transitional words- then, first, next, after. Through questioning, students were then asked what they think would be the result if various steps were taken before others. The teacher then, through questioning, illicited from students that actions must be done in order or in a particular sequence if they are to make sense.
The fishbowl strategy would be utilised, where students would be given a paper with an activity, and given an opportunity to discuss what steps should she taken at which points. Teacher will observe students as they engage in discussion. Students will also be observed as they work cooperatively in pairs to arrange picture cards in order to tell the story shown. Students will also be given the opportunity to share with classmates the story shown by the cards.
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