Lesson Plans - Details

Writing about Reading

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Vincent Coakley
  • Number of views: 117
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Writing about Reading
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Better Writers make better readers and better readers tend to produce better writings.
 
Description: Understanding that better writers make better readers and better readers tend to produce better writers, my desire will be to introduce each student to focus intently on the text. Students will be given a paragraph to read aloud, and then summarize in three to four sentences. A discussion will follow where students impart their understanding of the text. Students will be guided through the four experiences when they are engage in critical thinking during writing assignments. We will explore, their thinking, and whether or not their assumptions are valued or reliable guides for action. Evident through experiential, authoritative, and discipline research evidence. They will discover how different view points, determine if their assumptions are accurate. Thought and analysis are key areas to impart during critical thinking. Students will explore the three types of assumptions that everyone makes according to Stephen Brookfield: i) Paradigmatic - How we frame the world; ii) Prescriptive - How we think the world should work and how people behave; iii) Causal - Why things happen the way they do. Finally, students will uncover through writing assignments the different writing purpose. Areas such as Summarizing, Narrating, Responding, Arguing/Persuading, Examining/Investing, Analyzing, and Evaluation. To do this they will be persuaded to engage in critical writing by starting with small, easily completed activities, making sure that students analyze a paragraph or a single page, before moving onward to advance writings. Critical reading and writing will be fully practiced during each class session. Their critical thinking and writing skills will be discovered. Peer review will also be encourage. Students will model ways to critique contents by using popular texts. Strategies such as graphic organizers, questioning fast writing, group composition, changing view points, varying forms and cubing.

Rites of Passage in the four major religions

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Cleopatro Facey
  • Number of views: 582
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Rites of Passage in the four major religions
Students’ age range: 12-14
Main subject: Religious education
Topic: Rites of Passage associated with birth in the four major religion
 
Description: (Engage) Introduction:
Students will be asked if they know the song “when mothers of Salem”. Students who are familiar with the song will be asked to sing it aloud. After song is complete students will be asked to state the event the song is associated with. Students will also be asked to explain what takes place at this event and the importance of it. Students will be informed that a similar ceremony is done in the other three major religions.
(Explain) Step 1: Definition of key terms.
Students were given the key words in objective one to define from the previous session. Selected students will stand and share their definition with the rest of the class. Discussion will be held after each definition is given.

(Explore) Step 2: Birth Ceremonies in the four-major religion.
The class will be divided into eight groups. Each group will be given a birth rite of passage to look at. Groups will be given a section from their text " Religious Education for Jamaica" pages 82 – 85 to read and discuss in their groups. Students will be permitted to use internet to do further research on the rites of passage they were given. The teacher will walk around the class and assist students where needed.
(Extend) 3: Group presentation
After group discussion and research, each group will present what they have learnt to the rest of the class. Students will be asked to give a brief demonstration of the rites of passage their group looked at. A guided discussion will take place after each presentation.
Students will be asked to used the information they have gathered to create their own notes for the topic.

Comprehension

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Devin Saunds-Dunkley
  • Number of views: 660
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Comprehension
Students’ age range: 14-16
Main subject: Language arts and literature
Topic: Understanding Text Features
 
Description: There are two classes consisting of thirty-six studnets each that were taught the lesson over six sessions. The groups are being taught the curriculum for City and Guilds English Language which comes with core units that students must cover. Sessions were 80 minustes long and the lesson was covered in 6 sessions.
The lesson began with the students placed in small groups and the distribution of City and Guilds source documents to all students. The source documents which were colourful and had various text features on them that spanned the five categories. Students were asked to focus on questions related to the source document and the various features on it in their groups and select a reporter to respond to the questions and any other ideas they had about the source document.
Groups gave their responses and their points which ranged from having seen the some of the features before to knowing why some were used were note don the board for further discussion. Class is then led into a discussion where they are given the names of the categories under which the features fall and allowed to research each type of features and find examples on the source documents as well as from their research under each category. They will also look at the function of each of the features. Groups made their presentations to the class where they were critiqued by their peers and the teacher.
The students were then given an article on drugs taken from an English Language text and guided Reading followed. This was done to get the students understanding of the content as well as for them to identify the áreas for which they could use the text features to make the document more reader-friendly without losing the salient points from the article. Students were allowed to re-create their source document as a group homeowrk assignment and present their new source document for whole critiquing.
Students were allowed to interact with documents individually and in pairs where they recreated documents using text features and written assignments that involved them naming the features highlighted by the functions. Lesson ended with students individually completing a mini quizz involing matching and identifying text features that could be used in various areas of a given article


Slavery

  • 25 May 2018
  • Posted by: Kellie Brown
  • Number of views: 79
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Slavery
Students’ age range: 12-14
Main subject: Social studies
Topic: Slave Resistance
 
Description: Teacher will:
Have students watch a short video of slavery. After watching the video the teacher will ask students to express their thoughts on what they watched
Discuss with the class how slaves resisted enslavement.

Additionally, the teacher will discuss with students the slave revolt in Exuma. How it came about, Who was involved and was it successful?

Instruct students pretend to be slave during the slave revolt in Exuma. Draw a map of an escape route. The map must have all of the parts of a map.
Have students as a class role play the Pompey Revolt

Properties of Multiplication

  • 25 April 2018
  • Posted by: BERYLYN SMITH
  • Number of views: 130
  • 0 Comments
Properties of Multiplication
Students’ age range: 08-10
Main subject: Mathematics
Topic: Multiplication and Division
 
Description: Teacher will begin with the objectives. The teacher will play a PowerPoint on the Properties of Multiplication. Students will read notes and follow the PowerPoint as necessary. Exceptional learners will be grouped with others as recommended by teacher. The teacher will then explain to students that mathematicians have rules for how numbers work. Math rules are things that are always true in math. Ask students to think about some rules that we already have for how numbers work (numbers always show amounts, addition increases the amount, subtraction decreases the amount, and fractions are equal parts of a whole). Students will listen attentively and raise hands to ask or answer questions as necessary. Teacher will hand out worksheet containing notes. Students will be asked to write their own definitions of properties. They will be given 5 minutes. Teacher will ask students to turn to page 39 and 40 of Go Math Workbooks. Teacher will have students complete page. A Student will be given the worksheets to distribute. The students will write in their own definitions. Students will then take out Go Math book and complete pages 39 and 40. Teacher will review the page with the students. The teacher will ask students to verbally give examples of Properties of Multiplication. The students will make corrections as necessary. Individual Students will raise hands and give examples of the Properties. Teacher will correct students as necessary. Students will make corrections as necessary. Teacher will pass out papers cut into triangles. The triangles should have numbers students could use for multiplication problems written on the corners of the triangles. Model how to use the three numbers to prove each of the three properties. For example, with a triangle with numbers 3, 4, and 2 on the points, you can create:
• Commutative Property: 3 x 2 = 2 x 3
Students will work in groups to model the Properties. Each group will be assigned a Property to display at a time. Each student will be asked to take part. Teacher will tell students that you are going to give them a number and ask them to create equations that could get them to that number. For example, if you give students the number 24, they could create equations: 3 x 8, 8 x 3. Students will create equations for as many numbers as possible. Each student will be given an opportunity to create an equation. Teacher walks around and corrects as necessary. The students make corrections. Teacher recaps the lesson.
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