Lesson Plans - Details

Water Conservation

  • 21 October 2017
  • Posted by: Ried Iten
  • Number of views: 1126
  • 2 Comments
Water Conservation
Students’ age range: 14-16
Topic: Saving Energy
 
Description: The teacher will facilitate class discussion surrounding the students’ access to clean wáter. The teacher will guide the discussion and initiate pertinent questions where the necessary student will be asked to volunteer to measure the closest clean water access from the classroom (This measurement should be calculated in both distance and time) Upon return; the students will calculate volunteer’s speed (*). The warm-up activity will be used as an introduction to the Water Crisis, which will be followed by the presentation of a video; the following 3-minute video that will be played in class: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCHhwxvQqxg&feature=related. One student will read the story of someone in a developing world who has to walk a long distance to get drinking water. The teacher will reinforce that : To calculate speed: Speed = distance traveled Time (Velocity is speed in a specified direction) Velocity = distance traveled Time The speed of a body is defined as its rate of change of distance with time. Students will recall that the speed is the quotient of distance and time. When a body is traveling for any reasonable distance, then its speed would vary from time to time. So when we speak about the average speed of a body for a particular time interval we get: The average speed = distance travelled The time taken When an object moves with uniform velocity (constant velocity), it will cover equal distances in equal time intervals; that is distance is changing uniformly with time. Thus a graph of distance against time will be a straight line Teacher will ask open-ended questions to cement the relation between math and science as well as to hear the students explain their understanding of the topic Teacher will correct misconceptions where necessary Students will be given a worksheet to practice calculating the speed and creating linear growing patterns/ Drawing Distance-time Graph- The teacher will familiarize students with the rubric for the group activity The teacher will answer questions that may arise from the activity as well as clarify misconceptions if any The teacher will ensure that each group understands what is expected of them •Student groups will each be given a different case study (using real facts, as much as possible), which will provide information on a distance or a time taken to get clean water. •Groups will also be given a blank sheet of graph paper. •For example, one case study might note that the person walks 10km each day. Unless speed is provided, this can be estimated by the students. •In groups, students will draw a graph, comparing distance and time and to develop a graph and an equation. Using the graph or equation, students will estimate the time it takes the person to get water (if distance was provided or vice versa.) •Students will attempt the questions that accompany the graph (to check for understanding) This will be used the following day. (Sample question: based on your graph, if graph was well was constructed 0.5km, from the student’s home, how much time each day would they save?) Students should highlight the importance of water conservation The teacher will familiarize students with the rubric for the group activity The teacher will answer questions that may arise from the activity as well as clarify misconceptions if any The teacher will ensure that each group understands what is expected of them •Student groups will each be given a different case study (using real facts, as much as possible), which will provide information on a distance or a time taken to get clean water. •Groups will also be given a blank sheet of graph paper. •For example, one case study might note that the person walks 10km each day. Unless speed is provided, this can be estimated by the students. •In groups, students will draw a graph, comparing distance and time and to develop a graph and an equation. Using the graph or equation, students will estimate the time it takes the person to get water (if distance was provided or vice versa.) •Students will attempt the questions that accompany the graph (to check for understanding) This will be used the following day. (Sample question: based on your graph, if graph was well was constructed

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2 comments on article "Water Conservation"

Janice Smith

4/10/2018 8:53 PM

I like the fact that the teacher initiates a conversation to get the students to think and participate in the whole class discussion. The students give their understanding of the topic which will allow the teacher to observe and assessed their understanding. I like the fact that the students used graph.


Celina Roach

4/19/2018 6:11 AM

This lesson plan "Water Conservation" dated October 21st 2017 using Water Conservation to teach distance and speed is very innovative and uses real life experiences to teach a concept that at first to students may seem more theoretical. The inclusion of the video was very good and it makes the connection of driving home the point that not every one has access to potable water. It is age appropriate and creative and realistic to be used in an average classroom.

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