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Cultural Diversity
Ministerials Paragraphs Related to the Theme Paragraphs VII Summit

- Antigua and Barbuda - Argentina - Bahamas - Barbados - Belize - Bolivia - Brazil - Canada - Chile - Colombia - Costa Rica - Dominica - Dominican Republic - Ecuador - El Salvador - Grenada - Guatemala - Guyana - Haiti - Honduras - Jamaica - Mexico - Nicaragua - Panama - Paraguay - Peru - Saint Kitts and Nevis - Saint Lucia - Saint Vincent and the Grenadines - Suriname - Trinidad and Tobago - United States - Uruguay - Venezuela -
Reports
Date:  11/29/2010 
Guyana’s Constitution and statutes constantly and absolutely recognise its cultural, ethnic and religious diversity and the consequential sensitivities. Therefore embedded in the Constitution and legislations are provisions that address this diversity. The Constitution specifically makes provisions for Amerindian peoples (indigenous peoples made up of 9 distinctive linguistic groups) (Article 149 G). Equality and non- discrimination are basic tenets of the human rights corpus; discrimination is defined “on the grounds of race, place of origin, political opinion, colour, creed, age, disability, marital status, sex, gender, language, birth, social class, pregnancy, religion, conscience, belief or culture.”(Article 149 (2)) Article 149 (D) provides for equality of persons before the law; Article 149 (E) for equality status and 149 (F) for the equality of women.

Source: NATIONAL REPORT OF GUYANA ON FOLLOW-UP AND IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MANDATES OF THE DECLARATION OF COMMITMENT OF THE V SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS – PORT-OF-SPAIN (Guyana 2010)
Paragraphs: 44 Paragraphs VII Summit: -

Date:  11/29/2010 
II. INDIGENOUS PEOPLES

7.Guyana had made noteworthy advancement in relation to the development of its indigenous peoples, who represent some 9 per cent of its population. A Ministry of Amerindian Affairs has been established, and the Amerindian Act of 2006 provided for, inter alia, land claims, resource rights, traditional rights, the governance of communities and the establishment of a National Toshaos Council. Access to social services has been significantly improved, and more indigenous children were now in school than in any previous period in the country’s history. Over the past five years, the ownership of land by indigenous communities has increased from 6.5 per cent to approximately 14 per cent of Guyana’s land ass, with 134 communities now having legal title to the lands that they used and occupied. Those legal titles were grants of State lands that were “absolute and forever” and allowed for their indisputable control by communities. Addressing land claims is a continuous process.

8.The Amerindian Act 2006 provides for detailed rights in relation to the Amerindians, especially land rights. It provides generally for the recognition and protection of the collective rights of Amerindian Villages and Communities, the granting of land to Amerindian Villages and Communities and the promotion of good governance within Amerindian Villages an Communities. This is the primary legislation on the property rights of indigenous peoples over lands, territories and natural resources further complimented with other statutes.
Paragraphs: 44 Paragraphs VII Summit: -

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