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Confidence and security-building measures

Reports

SAN SALVADOR REGIONAL CONFERENCE ON CONFIDENCE- AND SECURITY-BUILDING MEASURES IN FOLLOW-UP TO THE SANTIAGO CONFERENCE
February 25 to 27, 1998
San Salvador, El Salvador
OEA/Ser.K/XXIX.2
COSEGRE.II/doc.9/98
19 October 1998
Original: Spanish
 

FINAL REPORT SAN SALVADOR REGIONAL CONFERENCE ON CONFIDENCE- AND SECURITY-BUILDING MEASURES IN FOLLOW-UP TO THE SANTIAGO CONFERENCE

I. BACKGROUND

1. Summit of the Americas 1994

The Heads of State and Government of the Hemisphere meeting in Miami in December, 1994 at the Summit of the Americas, addressed the issue of confidence-building among their nations and expressed their mutual position in the Plan of Action adopted on that occasion, stating as follows:

“8. Building Mutual Confidence

The expansion and consolidation of democracy in the Americas provide an opportunity to build upon the peaceful traditions and the cooperative relationships that have prevailed among the countries of the Western Hemisphere. Our aim is to strengthen the mutual confidence that contributes to the economic and social integration of our peoples.

Governments will:

• Support actions to encourage a regional dialogue to promote the strengthening of mutual confidence, preparing the way for a regional conference on confidence-building measures in 1995, which Chile has offered to host.”

2. Regional Conference on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures, Santiago, 1995

In pursuance of the commitment of the Heads of State and Government cited above, the Regional Conference on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures was held, under the auspices of the Organization of American States (OAS), in Santiago, Chile, from November 8-10, 1995. This Conference formulated a list of confidence- and security-building measures, set out in the Santiago Declaration, and recommended that these be implemented by member states. /

Apart from these confidence- and security-building measures, the Conference also recommended that a follow-up meeting be held.

3. Follow-up regional conference

a. Mandate

The General Assembly, at its twenty-sixth regular session, approved the holding of the follow-up regional conference as recommended, and in its resolution entitled “Regional Follow-up Conference on the Santiago Conference on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures [AG/RES. 1412 (XXVI-O/96)], resolved as follows:

“1. Convene a regional conference in follow-up to the Regional conference of Santiago on Measures of Confidence- and Security-Building.

2. To instruct Permanent Council to undertake, through its Committee on Hemispheric Security, preparatory work for that conference with a view to holding it, preferably, during the second half of 1997.

3. To instruct the General Secretariat to provide support, within available resources, for holding the Conference.”

In 1997, the General Assembly again addressed this issue and, having accepted the offer by the Government of El Salvador to host the follow-up conference, reiterated its instruction to the Permanent Council, through its resolution “Second Regional Conference on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures [AG/RES. 1495 (XXVII-O/97)], to carry out, through its Committee on Hemispheric Security, the preparatory work for the Conference, including the preparation and approval of the agenda, with a view to holding it in February, 1998.

b. Preparatory work

In compliance with the General Assembly mandates cited above, the Permanent Council, through its Committee on Hemispheric Security, took the necessary steps to prepare for the follow-up conference.

In the course of its deliberations, the Committee was visited by the then Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs of El Salvador, Dr. Luis Arturo Zaldivar Romero, who reported on the preparations underway in San Salvador, and proposed that the conference be held February 25-27, 1998. It must also be noted that among Santiago the confidence- and security-building measures, was one on the holding of a high-level meeting on the special security concerns of small island states, and that, in this context, the said Vice-Minister also conveyed his Government’s offer to host that high-level meeting in February 1998. /

On December 18, 1997, the Permanent Council, by means of its resolution CP/RES. 715 (1144/97) approved the date proposed for the Conference, as well as the draft agenda presented by the Committee.

In January 1997, the Committee began its consideration of the draft Declaration of San Salvador, presented by the Permanent Mission of El Salvador to the OAS, / and set up a drafting group under the chairmanship of the Permanent Representative of El Salvador. The draft was discussed at length in a series of intense formal and informal meetings and a final text was approved by the Committee on February 23, 1998. On the same date, the Permanent Council also approved the draft Declaration and agreed to forward it to the regional conference. /

II. PROCEEDINGS

The San Salvador Regional Conference on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures in follow-up to the Santiago Conference was held from the afternoon of February 25, to the morning of February 28, 1998. In addition to the inaugural and closing sessions, there were five plenary sessions during which the agenda, calendar and rules of procedure were adopted, authorities elected, a working group was set up to consider the draft Declaration mentioned above, the Heads of Delegation made statements covering the items on the Agenda, and the Declaration of San Salvador on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures was adopted. / Representatives from 27 Member States participated in the conference. /

1. Inaugural session

The Conference commenced on February 25, 1998, with the inaugural session under the chairmanship of the acting President of the Conference, René Domínguez, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs of El Salvador. Speeches were delivered by the Minster of Foreign Affairs of El Salvador, Dr. Ramón E.González Giner; the Secretary General of the OAS, Dr. César Gaviria; and the President of El Salvador, Dr. Armando Calderón Sol, who declared the Conference open. /

2. First plenary session

a. Adoption of decisions taken by the Permanent Council

At the first plenary session, also held on February 25, the decisions taken by the Permanent Council with respect to the Rules of Procedure, Agenda, and Calendar were adopted with some amendments. /

b. Election of officers

Also in the first plenary session, the officers of the Conference were elected, by acclamation, as follows: Chair -René Eduardo Domínguez, Vice-Minister of External Affairs of El Salvador; First Vice-Chair, Ambassador Pablo Cabrera, Head of Delegation of Chile; and Second Vice-Chair, Ambassador Cordell Wilson, Head of Delegation of Jamaica.

3. Second plenary session

The second plenary session, held on February 26, commenced with the consideration of the draft Declaration of San Salvador on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures, which item was deferred to a working group, established at that point. /

General statements covering the various items on the Agenda were then delivered by the Heads of Delegation in the following order: Paraguay, Peru, Colombia, Mexico, Haiti, Argentina, Brazil, Canada and Chile. /

During the course of the deliberations, the Head of Delegation of Antigua and Barbuda, with the agreement of the Chair and the delegations, ceded the floor to the President of the Inter-American Defense Board to allow for the presentation of the updated inventory of confidence- and security-building measures, undertaken in compliance with General Assembly resolutions. /

4. Third plenary session

The third plenary session was held on the afternoon of February 26, and chaired by the First Vice Chair, Ambassador Pablo Cabrera. General statements continued by the Heads of delegation, in the following order: Costa Rica, Uruguay, Ecuador, Nicaragua, United States, Venezuela, Guatemala, Guyana, Jamaica, Dominican Republic and Panama. /

The Chair then offered the floor to the Director of the Latin-American Faculty of Social Sciences (FLACSO), for some comments on the Agenda. /

5. Fourth plenary session

On February 27, the fourth plenary session was held to continue consideration of the items on the Agenda.

The delegations of Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, and El Salvador commented on item 7 of the Agenda. In its comments on this point, the delegation of Antigua and Barbuda also requested that the record of this Conference reflect the intervention by the Head of that delegation made during the High-Level Meeting on the Special Security Concerns of Small Island States with respect to the Regional Security System (RSS) of the Eastern Caribbean states, which intervention has since been published in the Final Report of that Meeting. /

The delegations of Antigua and Barbuda, Canada and Chile took the floor on items 8 and 9. The delegation of El Salvador also commented on item 9. 6. Working group on the draft Declaration of San Salvador on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures

The Working Group set up by the Conference in its first plenary session, met for the first time on the first day of the Conference, February 25, and elected, by acclamation, as Chair, the Permanent Representative of El Salvador to the OAS, Ambassador Mauricio Granillo Barrera.

The Group held five sessions, deliberating for two full days. The first agreement by the Group was with respect to the reference to the Santiago Declaration, and accordingly the measures emanating from that first Conference were incorporated as Appendix to the San Salvador. The Group then proceeded to consider the measures being proposed in the San Salvador Declaration, and agreed, at the outset, to eliminate all those measures which were merely reiterating measures contained in the earlier Santiago Declaration, on the basis that they were still in effect. The debate continued with respect to the measures to be included in the San Salvador Declaration, with discussion on their purpose, content, and appropriate language, as well as on new proposals put forward at the time, until a consensus was reached on all measures at the end of the third session.

The Group then proceeded to consider the paragraphs preceding the measures as well as those relating to the follow-up to the San Salvador Conference. For purposes of harmonizing the final paragraphs, the Chair set up a drafting group to consider the preceding paragraphs of the Declaration, under the guidance of the Chilean delegation, the results of which were submitted to the Working Group at its fourth session.

Delegations concluded a final draft, on which there was consensus, and agreed to forward it to the Plenary for adoption.

The delegation of Haiti was among those presenting new proposals, and put forward two such for the consideration of the Working Group, but a consensus position could not be reached on their inclusion in the Declaration. The delegation of Haiti withdrew its proposals on the understanding that the record of the Conference would reflect its proposals, which were as follows:

i. Recognize the need for increased promotion of the cooperation programs now underway with the Caribbean states to enable them to protect their environment, fight the pollution of their coastal areas by toxic wastes of every kind, and secure the removal from their territories of any toxic residues deposited there.

ii. Recognize that, in order to maintain the developing climate of trust in the region, it is necessary to enhance ties of friendship and step up economic cooperation among neighboring countries, as well as to strengthen existing mechanisms to resolve migration issues and any other difference that may arise among them.

7. Fifth plenary session

The fifth plenary session got underway at midnight on February 27, to consider the draft Declaration submitted by the Working Group, and adopted the text as presented.

The Conference also established a Style Committee, comprising Antigua and Barbuda, Brazil, Canada, and Venezuela, to review the texts of the Declaration in the four official languages of the Organization and introduce any necessary style changes.

III. CONCLUSION

1. Closing session

The Conference Chair closed the proceedings at 12:15 a.m. February 28, with congratulations and expressions of appreciation to all delegations. Delegations in turn, thanked the Government of El Salvador for its hospitality and placed on record their congratulations for the excellent facilities and services provided. The Conference also extended its appreciation to the General Secretariat of the Organization.

2. Style Committee

The Style Committee met at the headquarters of the General Secretariat of the Organization of American States (OAS) in Washington, D.C., on March 11, 12, and 31, 1998. The Alternate Representative of Venezuela was elected Chair of the Committee, and in that capacity presented his report / and the revised version of the Declaration to the Committee on Hemispheric Security at that Committee’s meeting on April 14, 1998.

The final version of the Declaration of San Salvador on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures was presented to the Permanent Council on May 4, 1998. APPENDIX I

SAN SALVADOR REGIONAL CONFERENCE OEA/Ser.K/XXIX.2 ON CONFIDENCE- AND SECURITY-BUILDING MEASURES COSEGRE.II/doc.7/98 rev. 3 IN FOLLOW-UP TO THE SANTIAGO CONFERENCE 7 April 1998 February 25-27, 1998 Original: Spanish San Salvador, El Salvador

DECLARATION OF SAN SALVADOR ON CONFIDENCE- AND SECURITY-BUILDING MEASURES

(Reviewed by the Style Committee) DECLARATION OF SAN SALVADOR ON CONFIDENCE- AND SECURITY-BUILDING MEASURES

(Adopted at the fifth plenary session, held February 28, 1998)

The member states of the Organization of American States, meeting at the San Salvador Regional Conference on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures in follow-up to the Santiago Conference:

Reaffirm that the 1995 Declaration of Santiago on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures and the measures set forth therein remain fully in effect / and, encouraged by the consolidation of democracy in the region and by efforts promoting international disarmament, peace, and security, express their willingness to continue strengthening confidence and security in the Hemisphere.

Recognize that mutual confidence has been strengthened through inter-American cooperation to face common problems affecting the security of states.

Reaffirm that respect for international law, faithful compliance with treaties, the peaceful settlement of disputes, respect for the sovereignty of states and for the principle of nonintervention, and the prohibition of the use or threat of the use of force, in accordance with the terms of the Charters of the Organization of American States and the United Nations, are the basis for peaceful coexistence and security in the Hemisphere, and constitute the framework for the development of confidence- and security-building measures. They also affirm that an essential condition for achieving an effective international security system is that all states submit to universal, equal, and binding rules.

Reaffirm also that consolidating democratic processes strengthens coexistence among states and security in the Hemisphere.

Acknowledge the significant progress made in identifying and applying confidence- and security-building measures since the adoption of the Declaration of Santiago, which has helped to reduce factors that generate distrust and contributed to the promotion of transparency and mutual confidence, in keeping with the purposes and principles of the Charter of the Organization of American States, respect for international law, and the promotion of friendly and cooperative relations among the states in the region.

Acknowledge further that the progress made in economic integration processes in the Hemisphere builds confidence and security, and recognize the importance of having all member states participate in and benefit from these processes.

Note with satisfaction the achievement of the first inhabited nuclear-weapon-free area of the world three decades after the pioneering effort enshrined in the Treaty of Tlatelolco.

Consider that the climate of hemispheric security has been further strengthened by the General Assembly decision to reaffirm the goals of the global elimination of antipersonnel land mines and the conversion of the Western Hemisphere into an antipersonnel-land-mine-free zone; by the adoption of the amended Protocol II to the Convention on Prohibitions or Restrictions on the Use of Certain Conventional Weapons Which May Be Deemed to Be Excessively Injurious or to Have Indiscriminate Effects; and by the signing of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production, and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Land Mines and on their Destruction, the signature and ratification of which, by all the member states, as soon as possible, they consider advisable. They further recognize the contribution to hemispheric security made by various bans, moratoria, and other restrictions on antipersonnel land mines already declared by states. They take note of efforts to address the antipersonnel land mine issue in other fora, including the United Nations, regional organizations and groupings, and the Conference on Disarmament.

Consider also that hemispheric security is further enhanced through two significant international actions: the signature of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty and the entry into force of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction. Additionally, the prompt and successful conclusion of current negotiations on a protocol to the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxic Weapons and on Their Destruction will also enhance hemispheric security.

Recall the OAS objective of concluding mine-clearing in Central America by the year 2000, and highlight the important achievements of the Mine-Clearing Assistance Program in that region, with the participation and support of a growing number of member states, permanent observers, and other states, as well as the technical assistance rendered by the Inter-American Defense Board.

Recognize that the prompt ratification and entry into force of the Inter-American Convention against the Illicit Production of and Trafficking in Firearms, Ammunition, Explosives, and Other Related Materials will contribute to further strengthening confidence, security, and cooperation among states to combat this serious problem.

Underscore the importance of the coming into force of the Framework Treaty on Democratic Security in Central America, based on its own model of security, which is a concrete and significant step forward for the subregion, and that the Committee on Security, established in that Treaty, is developing an annual program on confidence- and security-building measures to strengthen the rule of law and the democratic system.

Note with satisfaction the Declaration of the Presidents of Central America and the Dominican Republic and the Representative of the Prime Minister of Belize on the Non Participation in the Acquisition of Strategic High-Technology and High-Cost Weapons of Mass Destruction, which reflects the commitments made with respect to this issue and the decision by these states to dedicate their resources “to economic and social progress for increasing sustainable human development,” and which emphasizes the importance of “agreeing on and implementing a consultative process at the hemispheric level on the limitation and control of arms.”

Note with satisfaction the initiation of consultations in the Hemisphere, in follow-up to the Declaration of Santiago, on the limitation and control of conventional weapons, and in particular the work and reflections of the Rio Group on this issue.

Underscore the important progress achieved since the Declaration of Santiago by the Southern Cone countries in fostering mutual confidence and security, by setting up various permanent bilateral mechanisms for consultation and coordination on security matters and defense policies among Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, and Paraguay, as well as conducting joint military exercises between Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay.

Note with satisfaction the results of the Second Meeting of Ministers of Defense of the Americas, held in 1996 in Bariloche, Argentina, which contributed to confidence and to the exchange of viewpoints on defense and security issues.

Note the importance of inter-American conferences and meetings of Joint Chiefs of Staff and Armed Forces Chiefs of Staff to strengthen cooperation and implement any military confidence- and security-building measures adopted by the member states.

Recognize that the concept of security for the small island states of the Hemisphere is multidimensional in scope, involving state and nonstate actors, and includes political, economic, social, and natural components. The small island states have concluded that among the threats to their security are illegal drug trafficking, the illegal trade in arms, increasing levels of crime and corruption, environmental and economic vulnerability, particularly in relation to trade, susceptibility to natural disasters, transportation of nuclear waste, and increased levels of poverty.

Note that, pursuant to the decision of the OAS General Assembly regarding the Declaration of Santiago, the Committee on Hemispheric Security has received reports from governments as contributions to the preparation of a complete and systematic list of confidence- and security-building measures. This allows for the dissemination, follow-up, and periodic evaluation of its implementation. In this context, they reiterate the importance of the annual submission by member states of information on the measures referred to in resolutions AG/RES. 1409 (XXVI-O/96) and AG/RES. 1494 (XXVII-O/97).

Emphasize, in this regard, the work carried out by the OAS Committee on Hemispheric Security in conformity with the General Assembly resolutions on the Declaration of Santiago.

Recognize that the growing application of confidence- and security-building measures is an expression of the political will of the states to strengthen peace and security in the Hemisphere. Their implementation, in conformity with the geographic, political, social, cultural, and economic conditions of each country or region and with the needs of each state, in the most appropriate manner, contributes to increasing security in the Hemisphere.

Emphasize that the application of confidence- and security-building measures, through practical and useful actions, will facilitate more far-reaching cooperation processes in the future in areas such as arms control and hemispheric security.

Convinced of the importance of the confidence- and security-building process, and of the implementation of measures such as those identified in the Declaration of Santiago, for the consolidation of a region inspired by democratic values and sustained by a culture of peace, agree to recommend the application, in the most appropriate manner, of additional measures including the following:

a. Encourage contact and cooperation among legislators on confidence-building measures and on matters of peace and hemispheric security, including conferences, the exchange of visits, and a meeting of parliamentarians, in order to strengthen this process.

b. Extend to diplomatic training institutes, military academies, research centers, and universities the seminars, courses, and studies envisioned in the Declarations of Santiago and San Salvador on confidence- and security-building measures, disarmament, and other issues related to peace and hemispheric security, with participation in those activities by government, civilian, and military officials and by civil society.

c. Identify and carry out activities promoting cooperation among neighboring countries along their border regions.

d. Promote the exchange of information, inter alia, through the publication of books on defense or official documents, as appropriate, permitting greater transparency with respect to the defense policies of each country, and on the organization, structure, size, and composition of the armed forces.

e. In order to promote transparency, and with technical support from the appropriate international economic agencies, encourage the carrying out of studies for establishing a common methodology in order to facilitate the comparison of military expenditures in the region, taking into account, inter alia, the United Nations Standardized International Reporting of Military Expenditures. f. Develop a cooperation program to address the concerns raised by maritime transport of nuclear and other waste, and to cooperate and coordinate in the relevant international fora to strengthen standards governing such transport and its safety.

g. Continue supporting the efforts of the small island states to address their special security concerns, including those of an economic, financial, and environmental nature, taking into consideration their vulnerability and level of development.

h. Improve and broaden the information submitted by the member states to the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms, so as to enhance the Hemisphere’s contribution to pursuing the aims of that register, in compliance with the relevant resolutions of the UN General Assembly.

i. Continue consultations and the exchange of ideas within the Hemisphere to advance the limitation and control of conventional weapons in the region.

Express the advisability of strengthening mechanisms and instruments for the peaceful settlement of disputes.

Recommend that the Committee on Hemispheric Security hold a special meeting annually, with the participation of experts, dedicated to the analysis and exchange of information on the confidence- and security-building measures identified in the Declaration of Santiago, in this Declaration, and in the relevant mandates of the General Assembly of the OAS, with a view to assessing progress on their implementation in the Hemisphere. Recommend also that the Committee on Hemispheric Security:

a. Study the recommendations emanating from the High-Level Meeting on the Special Security Concerns of Small Island States, held on February 25, 1998, in order to generate greater awareness and understanding of the special security concerns of the small island states of the Caribbean, and continue to implement appropriate action, as well as identify new measures of cooperation to address these concerns.

b. Hold a meeting for which member states would make available their experts who had served on the group of government experts on the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms, in order that those experts provide information about the results of the group’s work, and convene a meeting for an exchange of views in order to increase participation in the register.

c. Seek, in its deliberations, to advance the development of the most appropriate approach at the hemispheric level with a view to strengthening dialogue to manage questions related to conventional weapons.

d. Seek, in its deliberations, to advance the development of the most appropriate approach at the hemispheric level with a view to strengthening dialogue to manage questions related to small arms and trafficking therein.

e. Conclude the preparation of, and begin to implement, the education program for peace in the Hemisphere agreed on by the General Assembly of the OAS.

f. Promote the exchange of experiences among the member states as well as with relevant regional and nonregional organizations and institutions, in order to strengthen international peace and security.

Recommend to the Organization of American States that it take the initial steps to facilitate the meeting of parliamentarians referred to earlier in this Declaration.

Recommend that the General Secretariat annually update the OAS Register of Experts on confidence- and security-building measures appointed by the member states.

Recommend that the General Assembly consider, when appropriate, the holding, by way of follow-up, of another regional conference on confidence- and security-building measures, as well as another high-level meeting on the special security concerns of small island states.

Recall that this conference is being held in follow-up to the Regional Conference on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures (Santiago, Chile, November 1995) mandated by the Summit of the Americas (Miami, December 1994). In that regard, they express their conviction that the Summit of the Americas to be held in Santiago, Chile, this April is an important opportunity to consolidate achievements in hemispheric confidence and security. They also expect it to be an opportunity to consider guidelines according to which the OAS, through its relevant bodies, would study possible means of revitalizing and strengthening the institutions of the inter-American system related to the various aspects of hemispheric security, with a view to meeting the challenges of the coming century. The member states express their special appreciation to the Government of El Salvador for its excellent work in preparing for and conducting the Regional Conference and the High-Level Meeting, as well as for the many courtesies it extended to the participating delegations. They also wish to thank the OAS General Secretariat for its efforts in organizing the two meetings.

San Salvador, El Salvador February 28, 1998

APPENDIX

CONFIDENCE- AND SECURITY-BUILDING MEASURES /

In accordance with the foregoing, the governments of the OAS member states, meeting in Santiago, Chile, agree to recommend the application, in the manner that is most suitable, of confidence- and security-building measures, among which the following should be mentioned:

a. Gradual adoption of agreements regarding advance notice of military exercises;

b. Exchange of information and participation of all member states in the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms and the Standardized International Reporting of Military Expenditures;

c. Promotion of the development and exchange of information concerning defense policies and doctrines;

d. Consideration of a consultation process with a view to proceeding towards limitation and control of conventional weapons;

e. Agreements on invitation of observers to military exercises, visits to military installations, arrangements for observing routine operations and exchange of civilian and military personnel for regular and advanced training;

f. Meetings and activities to prevent incidents and increase security for transport by land, sea, and air;

g. Cooperation programs in the event of natural disasters or to prevent such disasters, based on the request and authorization of the affected states;

h. Development and establishment of communications among civilian or military authorities of neighboring countries in accordance with their border situation;

i. Holding of seminars and courses, and studies on mutual confidence- and security-building measures and policies to promote confidence involving the participation of civilians and military personnel, and on the special security concerns of small island states;

j. A high-level meeting on the special security concerns of small island states; and

k. Education Programs of education for peace.

APPENDIX II

SAN SALVADOR REGIONAL CONFERENCE ON CONFIDENCE- OEA/Ser.K/XXIX.2 AND SECURITY-BUILDING MEASURES IN FOLLOW-UP TO THE COSEGRE.II/doc.6/98 rev. 1 SANTIAGO CONFERENCE 25 February 1998 February 25 to 27, 1998 Original: Spanish San Salvador, El Salvador

RULES OF PROCEDURE OF THE SAN SALVADOR REGIONAL CONFERENCE ON CONFIDENCE- AND SECURITY-BUILDING MEASURES IN FOLLOW-UP TO THE SANTIAGO CONFERENCE

(Approved at the first Plenary session held on February 12, 1998) DRAFT RULES OF PROCEDURE OF THE SAN SALVADOR REGIONAL CONFERENCE ON CONFIDENCE- AND SECURITY-BUILDING MEASURES IN FOLLOW-UP TO THE SANTIAGO CONFERENCE

(Approved by the Committee on Hemispheric Security at its meeting of February 12, 1998)

I. PURPOSE OF THE CONFERENCE

Article 1. Convened by the General Assembly of the Organization of American States through its resolution AG/RES. 1495 (XXVII-O/97), “San Salvador Regional Conference on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures in follow-up to the Santiago Conference”, the Conference meets to consider the topics on the draft agenda approved by the Permanent Council in its resolution CP/RES. 715 (1144/97) and adopted by the Conference.

Documents, studies, proposals, and drafts presented by member states on the agenda items shall also be considered.

II. PARTICIPANTS

Article 2. The governments of member states of the Organization may accredit delegations to the Conference. Delegations may be comprised of the representatives, advisers, and other members accredited by the governments.

Article 3. Accreditation shall be accomplished by way of communications addressed to the Secretary General of the Organization.

Article 4. The Secretary General of the Organization or a representative designated by him shall participate in the Conference with voice but without vote, in accordance with Article 110 of the Charter of the Organization.

Article 5. Permanent observer state governments may accredit observers to the Conference by writing to the Secretary General and in accordance with the resolutions of the General Assembly and the Permanent Council.

The following parties may also accredit observers to the Conference:

a. Governments of states that are neither member nor permanent observer states of the Organization, if the Committee on Hemispheric Security or the Conference so decides, with the agreement of the host country;

b. Inter-American specialized organizations and regional intergovernmental organizations of the Americas;

c. The United Nations and its associated specialized agencies; d. Other international or national organizations or agencies, if so decided by the Committee on Hemispheric Security or the Conference, with the agreement of the host country government.

The General Secretariat shall issue invitations to the international institutions referred to in subparagraphs (b) and (c) and, at the request of the Committee on Hemispheric Security or of the Conference, to the institutions and governments mentioned in subparagraphs (a) and (d).

Article 6. International or national nongovernmental organizations or agencies and individuals of recognized competence in the matters to be considered may attend the Conference as special guests, if the Committee on Hemispheric Security or the Conference so decides, with the agreement of the host country government.

Article 7. The observers mentioned in Article 5 may take the floor at the Conference at the invitation of the chair.

The special guests mentioned in Article 6 may take the floor if the Conference so decides.

III. OFFICERS OF THE CONFERENCE

Article 8. The government of the host country shall appoint an interim Conference chair, who shall serve until the Conference elects its chair, and who shall be a representative of that country. Conference shall also elect its Vice-Chair.

Article 9. The chair of the Conference shall take any steps he or she deems appropriate to facilitate the proceedings and secure adherence to these Rules of Procedure.

Article 10. Working groups shall be formed as may be necessary; the respective chairs shall be elected as agreed to by the participating delegates.

IV. SECRETARIAT

Article 11. The General Secretariat of the Organization of American States shall provide technical and secretariat services to the Conference. Such services shall be supervised by a staff member so appointed by the Secretary General of the Organization.

V. SESSIONS AND MEETINGS OF THE CONFERENCE

Article 12. The Conference shall have an opening session, plenary sessions and a closing session. Meetings of any working groups established may also be held.

Article 13. Decisions adopted by the Permanent Council in its resolution CP/RES. 715 (1144/97), “San Salvador Regional Conference on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures in follow-up to the Santiago Conference”, as well as those taken by the Committee on Hemispheric Security shall be formally adopted at the plenary session. Article 14. The Conference shall meet in plenary session to hear the general statements of the heads of delegation in accordance with the order of precedence established by lot by the Permanent Council in its session of February 11, 1998. As a general rule, such statements shall last no more than seven minutes.

Article 15. Unless otherwise decided by the Conference, the sessions and meetings referred to in Article 12 shall be open. Observers and special guests may attend the open sessions and meetings of the Conference, and may attend closed sessions and meetings when invited by the chair with the agreement of the Conference.

VI. DISCUSSIONS, PROCEEDINGS, AND VOTING

Article 16. English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish shall be the official languages of the Conference.

Article 17. A majority of the delegations accredited to the Conference shall constitute a quorum for plenary sessions and for meetings of the working group.

Article 18. In order for any decision taken by the Conference to be reconsidered, a corresponding motion approved by a majority vote of the delegations accredited to the Conference shall be required.

Article 19. During discussion of a topic, any delegation may raise a point of order, which shall be decided upon immediately by the chair. Any delegation may appeal this decision, in which case the appeal shall be put to a vote. While raising a point of order, a delegation may not go into the substance of the matter under discussion.

Article 20. The chair or any delegation may propose suspension of discussion. Only two delegations may speak in favor of, and two against, such a motion, which shall be put to a vote immediately.

Article 21. The chair or any delegation may propose that a discussion be brought to a close when they deem a matter to have been discussed sufficiently. Only two delegations may speak in favor of, and two against, such a motion, which shall be put to a vote immediately.

Article 22. During any discussion, the chair or any delegation may propose suspension or adjournment of the session or meeting. Such a motion shall be put to a vote immediately and without discussion.

Article 23. The Conference shall make every effort to adopt its decisions by consensus.

Article 24. When every effort to arrive at a consensus has been made, the Conference may adopt decisions by a majority vote of the delegations accredited to the Conference.

Article 25. Voting shall be conducted by a show of hands, but any delegation may request a roll-call vote, which shall be taken beginning with the member states accredited to the Conference in Spanish alphabetical order.

VII. CONCLUSIONS AND FINAL REPORT

Article 26. The chair of the Conference shall forward the final conclusions of the Conference, through the General Secretariat of the Organization of American States, to the governments of the member states of the Organization and to the other Conference participants.

Article 27. Procedural matters not provided for in these Rules of Procedure shall be resolved by the Conference itself.

CR00087E01.DOC APPENDIX III

SAN SALVADOR REGIONAL CONFERENCE ON CONFIDENCE- OEA/Ser.K/XXIX.2 AND SECURITY-BUILDING MEASURES IN FOLLOW-UP TO THE COSEGRE.II/doc.2/98 rev. 1 SANTIAGO CONFERENCE 25 February 1998 February 25 to 27, 1998 Original: Spanish San Salvador, El Salvador

AGENDA FOR THE SAN SALVADOR REGIONAL CONFERENCE ON CONFIDENCE- AND SECURITY-BUILDING MEASURES IN FOLLOW-UP TO THE SANTIAGO CONFERENCE

1. Election of the Chair

2. Election of the Vice-Chair

3. Adoption of the draft Rules of Procedure

4. Agreement on a work plan

5. General statements by Heads of Delegation

6. Frame of reference for strengthening confidence- and security-building measures in the Americas

7. Implementation of confidence- and security-building measures in the Americas as established in the Santiago Declaration. National and subregional achievements and experiences.

8. Consideration of other confidence- and security-building measures

a. Confidence- and security-building measures included in the Framework Treaty on Democratic Security in Central America.

b. Confidence- and security-building measures and special security concerns of small island states.

c. National experiences.

d. Possible areas for further cooperation on confidence- and security-building measures.

9. Follow-up on confidence- and security-building measures in the Americas

a. Exchange of information and experiences on confidence- and security-building measures in the Americas. The role of the Committee on Hemispheric Security.

b. Exchange of information and experiences in confidence- and security-building measures with other intergovernmental organizations.

c. Dissemination and systematization of information, periodical evaluation and follow-up at the hemispheric and sub-regional level. The role of the Organization of American States.

10. Declaration of San Salvador

CR00085E01 APPENDIX IV

SAN SALVADOR REGIONAL CONFERENCE ON CONFIDENCE- OEA/Ser.K/XXIX AND SECURITY-BUILDING MEASURES IN FOLLOW-UP TO THE COSEGRE.II/doc.3/98 rev. 1 SANTIAGO CONFERENCE 25 February 1998 February 25 to 27, 1998 Original: Spanish San Salvador, El Salvador

SAN SALVADOR REGIONAL CONFERENCE ON CONFIDENCE- AND SECURITY-BUILDING MEASURES IN FOLLOW-UP TO THE SANTIAGO CONFERENCE

CALENDAR

Wednesday, February 25, 1998

3:30 - 4:00 p.m. INAUGURATION

Remarks • Interim Chair • Secretary General of the OAS, Dr. Cesar Gaviria

Special Program

4:00 - 4:15 p.m. Break

4:15 - 6:00 p.m. FIRST PLENARY SESSION

1. Adoption of the decisions taken by the Permanent Council and the Committee on Hemispheric Security • Rules of Procedure • Agenda • Calendar

2. Election of officers • Chair • Vice-Chair

FIRST WORKING GROUP MEETING

1. Election of the Chair 2. Agreement on work methodology

Thursday, February 26, 1998

8:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m. SECOND PLENARY SESSION

1. Consideration of the draft Declaration of San Salvador on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures

2. Establishment of the Working Group to consider the draft Declaration of San Salvador on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures

3. Statements by the Heads of Delegation

9:00 a.m. - 12:45 p.m. SECOND WORKING GROUP MEETING

Consideration of the draft Declaration of San Salvador on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures

12:45 - 2:30 p.m. Lunch break

2:30 - 4:45 p.m. THIRD PLENARY SESSION

Statements by the Heads of Delegation continued

2:30 - 4:45 p.m. THIRD WORKING GROUP MEETING

Consideration of the draft Declaration of San Salvador on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures continued

Friday, February 27, 1998

8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. FOURTH PLENARY SESSION

Statements by the Heads of Delegation continued

10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. THIRD WORKING GROUP MEETING

Approval of the draft Declaration of San Salvador on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures

12:30 - 2:30 p.m. Lunch break

2:30 - 3:30 p.m. FIFTH PLENARY SESSION

Presentation and adoption of the Draft Declaration of San Salvador on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures

3:30 - 4:30 p.m CLOSING SESSION

CR00087E01.DOC APPENDIX V

STATEMENTS DELIVERED AT THE INAUGURAL SESSION16/

1. Dr. Ramón E. González Giner, Minister of Foreign Affairs of El Salvador 2. Dr. César Gaviria, Secretary General of the Organization of American States 3. Dr. Armando Calderón Sol, President of El Salvador

___________________________ 16. Statements are published in chronological order in the language in which they were delivered.

APPENDIX VI

GENERAL STATEMENTS DELIVERED BY HEADS OF DELEGATION AT THE SECOND AND THIRD PLENARY SESSIONS17/

1. Emilio Balbuena, Encargado de Negocios a.i. de la Embajada en El Salvador 2. Palma Valderrama, Viceministro y Secretario General del Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores 3. Camilo Reyes, Viceministro de Relaciones Exteriores 4. Sergio González Gálvez, Embajador, Asesor Especial de la Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores 5. Guy Pierre, Représentant permanent par intérim près l’OEA 6. Alberto Luis Daverede, Embajador, Subsecretario de Política Exterior 7. Celina Maria Assunção do Valle Pereira, Embaixadora, Diretora-Geral do Departamento de Organismos Internacionais do Ministério da Relação Exteriores 8. Jill Sinclair, Director, Non-proliferation, Arms Control and Disarmament Division Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade 9. Chile 10. Julio Prado Vallejo, Embajador, Representante Permanente ante la OEA 11. Lester Mejía Solís, Jefe de Delegación, Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores 12. Ralph Earle II Ambassador, Deputy Director U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency 13. Odeen Ishmael, Ambassador, Permanent Representative to the OAS

___________________________

17. Only those general statements circulated by delegations at the Conference are included in this Report. These statements are in chronological order in the language in which they were delivered.

APPENDIX VII

REMARKS BY REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS18/

1. President of the Inter-American Defense Board (IADB) 2. Director of the Latin-American Faculty of Social Sciences (FLACSO)

____________________________

18. Remarks are published in chronological order in the language in which they were delivered.

APPENDIX VIII

CONFERENCIA REGIONAL DE SAN SALVADOR OEA/Ser.K/XXIX.2 SOBRE MEDIDAS DE FOMENTO DE LA CONFIANZA COSEGRE.II/doc.8/98 rev. 2 Y DE LA SEGURIDAD EN SEGUIMIENTO DE LA 22 junio 1998 CONFERENCIA DE SANTIAGO Textual 25 al 27 de febrero de 1998 San Salvador, El Salvador

LISTA DE PARTICIPANTES ESTADOS MIEMBROS

ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA

Head of Delegation

Lionel A. Hurst Ambassador, Permanent Representative to the OAS

Delegate

Deborah-Mae Lovell Minister Counsellor, Alternate Representative to the OAS

ARGENTINA

Jefe de Delegación

Alberto Luis Daverede Embajador Subsecretario de Política Exterior

Delegados

Jorge Pereira Embajador en El Salvador

Pedro Villagra Delgado Ministro Director de Seguridad Internacional y Asuntos Nucleares y Especiales

Juan Carlos Valle Raleigh Consejero Representante Alterno ante la OEA

Carlos Alberto Candia Teniente Coronel Agregado Militar Adjunto de la Misión Argentina ante la OEA

Fabián Oddone Secretario de Embajada Representante Alterno ante la OEA BAHAMAS, COMMONWEALTH OF THE

Head of Delegation

Sir Arlington G. Butler Ambassador, Permanent Representative to the OAS

BELIZE

Head of Delegation

Carlos Perdomo Permanent Secretary Ministry of National Security

Delegate

Ornell Brooks Commissioner of Police

BRASIL

Chefe da Delegação

Celina Maria Assunção do Valle Pereira Embaixadora, Diretora-Geral do Departamento de Organismos Internacionais do Ministério da Relação Exteriores

Subchefe

Ruy de Lima Casaes e Silva Ministro, Representante Alterno junto à OEA

Delegados

Francisco de Oliveira Netto Junior Brigadeiro-do-Ar-Chefe da Representação na Junta Interamericana de Defesa

Edmundo Sussumu Fujita Ministro, Subsecretãrio de Análise e Avaliação da Secretaria de Assuntos Estratégicos da Presidência da República Humberto Batista Leal Tenente-Conselheiro, Assessor Militar junto ao Exército Salvadorenho

Alexandre Affonso da Motta Barboza Conselheiro da Embaixada em San Salvador

CANADA

Head of Delegation

Jill Sinclair Director Non-proliferation, Arms Control and Disarmament Division Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade

Delegates

Renata E. Wielgosz Counsellor, Alternate Representative to the OAS

Jean-Paul Chabot Lieutenant Colonel Arms Proliferation and Control Directorate Department of Nacional Defence

Alan Bones Hemispheric Affairs Regional Security and Peacekeeping Division Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade

Douglas Fraser First Secretary and Consul Consulate of Canada, San Salvador

Hal Klepak Advisor to the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade

CHILE

Jefe de Delegación

Pablo Cabrera Embajador Subsecretario de Marina Ministerio de Defensa Nacional Jefe Alterno de Delegación

Carlos Portales Embajador, Representante Permanente ante la OEA

Delegados

Carlos Croharé Consejero, Representante Alterno ante la OEA

José Miguel Capdevila Primer Secretario Dirección de Política Especial Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores

Eduardo Quiroga Coronel del Ejército Ministerio de Defensa Nacional

Francisco Rojas Director Facultad Lationoamericana de Ciencias Sociales (FLACSO)

COLOMBIA

Jefe de Delegación

Camilo Reyes Viceministro de Relaciones Exteriores

Delegados

Carlos Eduardo Jaramillo Ministro Plenipotenciario ante la OEA Hernando Piedrahita Currea Embajador en El Salvador

Carlos Eduardo Rojas Ríos Agregado Militar Embajada de Colombia en El Salvador

Humberto Peláez Orozco Primer Secretario y Cónsul Embajada en El Salvador

COSTA RICA

Jefe de Delegación

José Alberto Brenes León Embajador en El Salvador

Delegados

Ghisselle Blanco de Rodríguez Ministro Consejero Embajada

Carlota de López Lindo Ministro de Consejero y Cónsul General

Embajada Fernando Borbón Arias

Ministro Consejero Embajada

ECUADOR

Jefe de Delegación

Julio Prado Vallejo Embajador, Representante Permanente ante la OEA Delegados

Carmen Alarcón Neira Secretaria Funcionaria de la Embajada en San Salvador

EL SALVADOR

Jefe de Delegación

René Eduardo Domínguez Viceministro de Relaciones Exteriores Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores

Delegados

Jorge Alberto Carranza Alvarez Viceministro de Seguridad Pública

Omar Arturo Vaquerano Quintanilla Viceministro de la Defensa Nacional Mauricio Granillo Barrera Embajador, Representante Permanente ante la OEA

Luis Menéndez Castro Representante Alterno ante la OEA

José Francisco González Cortez Encargado de Asuntos de Integración Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores

Jaime Alberto Suárez García Secretario General Ministerio de la Defensa Nacional

Derling Alberto Rivas Platero Asesor Ministerio de la Defensa Nacional

Guillermo Magana Asesor del Viceministro de Seguridad Pública Ministerio de Seguridad Pública

GUATEMALA

Jefe de Delegación

Byron René Escobedo Menéndez Director de Política Multilateral Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores

Delegados

Oscar Augusto Zelaya Embajador en El Salvador

Fernando García Primer Secretario, Representante Alterno ante la OEA

Manuel Arturo Téllez Ministro Consejero de la Embajada

Edwin Roberto Palencia Agregado Militar Embajada de Guatemala

Nemesio Constantino Pelaez Morales Teniente Coronel Ministerio de la Defensa

Byron Gutiérrez Valdez Capitán de Infantería Ministerio de la Defensa

GUYANA

Head of Delegation

Odeen Ismael Ambassador, Permanent Representative to the OAS

HAITI

Chef de la Délégation

Guy Pierre Représentant permanent par intérim près l’OEA Délégué

Jean Ricot Dormeus Directeur des affaires politiques à la chancellerie d’Haiti

JAMAICA

Head of Delegation

Cordell Wilson Ambassador to Mexico

Delegate

Vilma McNish Minister, Alternate Representative to the OAS

MÉXICO

Jefe de Delegación

Sergio González Gálvez Embajador, Asesor Especial de la Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores

Delegados

José Ignacio Piña Rojas Embajador en El Salvador

Germán Redondo Azudra General Agregado Militar y Aéreo de la Embajada en El Salvador

Lourdes Aranda Consejero, Representante Alterno ante la OEA

Luis Efren Bauza Consejero de la Embajada en El Salvador

NICARAGUA

Jefe de Delegación

Lester Mejía Solís Jefe de Delegación Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores

Delegados

Myriam Vásquez G. Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores

Cristóbal Genie Secretario General Ministerio de Defensa

Juan René Icaza Jiménez Estado Mayor General Ejército de Nicaragua

PANAMÁ

Jefe de Delegación

Armando León Macas Asistente del Director General de Organismos y Conferencias Internacionales del Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores

PARAGUAY

Jefe de Delegación

Emilio Balbuena Encargado de Negocios a.i. de la Embajada en El Salvador

Delegado

Julio César Arriola Ramírez Consejero, Representante Alterno ante la OEA

PERÚ

Jefe de Delegación

Hugo Palma Valderrama Viceministro y Secretario General del Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores

Delegados

Beatriz Ramacciotti Regazzoli Embajadora, Representante Permanente ante la OEA

Raúl Patiño Alvistur Director de Planeamiento y Evaluación de Programas

Antonio Gruter Vásquez Embajador ante la República de El Salvador

Elizabeth Astete Ministra, Representante Alterna ante la OEA

Jorge Lázaro Geldres Jefe del Departamento de Evaluación de Programas de la Dirección de Planeamiento y Evaluación de Programas

Rubén La Torre Valenzuela Embajada en El Salvador Segundo Secretario en el Servicio Diplomático de la República

REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Jefe de Delegación

Jorge A. Santiago Pérez Embajador en El Salvador

Delegados

Dionisio Porfirio García Arroyo Coronel E.N. Ejército de la República

Héctor Miguel Pérez Urueña Coronel E.N. Ejército de la República Auron Ther Secretario de Primera Clase Embajada Dominicana en El Salvador

SAINT LUCIA

Head of Delegation

Sonia M. Johnny Ambassador, Permanent Representative to the OAS

Delegate

Brian Bernard Foreign Service Officer Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Trade

SAINT VINCENT AND THE GRENADINES

Head of Delegation

Kingsley C. A. Layne Ambassador, Permanent Representative to the OAS

SURINAME

Head of Delegation

Albert Ramdin Ambassador, Permanent Representative to the OAS

URUGUAY

Jefe de Delegación

Enrique Delgado G. Embajador ante la República de El Salvador

Delegado

Conrado Silveira Tercer Secretario, Cancillería de Uruguay

UNITED STATES

Head of Delegation

Ralph Earle II Ambassador, Deputy Director U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency

Alternate Head of Delegation

Víctor Marrero Ambassador, Permanent Representative to the OAS

Delegates

John R. Hamilton Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Inter-American Affairs Department of State

Giovanni Snidle Counselor, Alternate Representative to the OAS Senior Foreign Affairs Specialist U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency

Roberta Jacobson Director, Office of Policy Planning, Coordination, and Press Bureau of Inter-American Affairs Department of State

Theodore Piccone Director, Inter-American Affairs National Security Council

Thomas Ochittree Political Advisor Alternate Representative to the OAS

William Mock Office of the Secretary of Defense Department of Defense Joseph A. Cuellar Lieutenant Colonel Strategic Plans and Policy Directorate Joint Chiefs of Staff

Paul Ortiz, USMC Lieutenant Colonel Strategic Plan and Policy Directorate Joint Chiefs of Staff

Douglas W. Seller, USN Lieutenant Southern Command

Randall R. Parish Cooperative Monitoring Center

Erin Heaton Special Advisor to the Deputy Director U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency

VENEZUELA

Jefe de Delegación

Elsa Boccheciampe Embajadora en El Salvador

Delegados

Hedy Hernández Ortega Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores

Ricardo Mario Rodríguez Ministro Consejero Representante Alterno ante la OEA

OBSERVADORES PERMANENTES ANTE LA OEA

BÉLGICA

Willy Stevens Ambassadeur du Belgique au Costa Rica

Bruno Van der Pluijm Premier Secrétaire de l’Ambassadeur de Belgique au Costa Rica

ESPAÑA

Joaquín De Aristeguí Consejero Embajada de España

FEDERACIÓN DE RUSIA

Andrey V. Dmítriyev Embajador Extraordinario y Plenipotenciario de Rusia en la República de Nicaragua, la República de Honduras y la República de El Salvador

Andzei Dmitzier Embajador en Nicaragua, El Salvador y Honduras

Oleg M. Ostrovsky Segundo Secretario de la Embajada de Rusia en la República de Nicaragua

FRANCIA

Jean-Paul Barre Ambassadeur, Observateur permanent près l’OEA

ENTIDADES Y ORGANISMOS INTERAMERICANOS GUBERNAMENTALES REGIONALES O SUBREGIONALES

Caribbean Community (CARICOM)

Arthur A. Gray Director Foreign Policy and External Economic Relations CARICOM Secretariat

Inter-American Defense Board (IADB)

John C. Thompson Chairman Major General United States Army

Sergio Sampietro Comodoro Argentine Air Force

Carlos Oviedo Colonel Chilean Army

María Cecilia Rozas Peru Advisor, IADC

William Fullerton Executive Officer Lieutenant Colonel United States Army

NACIONES UNIDAS, ORGANISMOS ESPECIALIZADOS VINCULADOS CON LAS NACIONES UNIDAS Y OTROS ORGANISMOS INTERNACIONALES

The Carter Center

Shelley A. McConnell Associate Director

INVITADOS ESPECIALES

Comité Internacional de la Cruz Roja

Dominique Henry Delegación Regional Guatemala

ORGANIZACIÓN DE LOS ESTADOS AMERICANOS

César Gaviria Secretario General

Christopher R. Thomas Ambassador, Assistant Secretary General

 

 


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